Executive LLM at LSE


clunkey
Has anyone applied to/been accepted to the Executive LLM program at LSE?
Has anyone applied to/been accepted to the Executive LLM program at LSE?
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mrj
Has anyone applied to/been accepted to the Executive LLM program at LSE?


just got an offer today which I accepted - applied about 5 weeks ago. You?
<blockquote>Has anyone applied to/been accepted to the Executive LLM program at LSE?</blockquote>

just got an offer today which I accepted - applied about 5 weeks ago. You?
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clunkey
All my supporting documents were final about 5 weeks ago and I am still waiting to hear. Where are you from?
All my supporting documents were final about 5 weeks ago and I am still waiting to hear. Where are you from?
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mrj
Irish but living in the Netherlands at the moment. And you?

I reckon you will hear soon - mine took 5 weeks give or take a day. Good luck.
Irish but living in the Netherlands at the moment. And you?

I reckon you will hear soon - mine took 5 weeks give or take a day. Good luck.
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clunkey
Still no word. It's been 6 weeks and 3 days since all documentation went final. Really hoping to get good news soon! I'm from the US. Hope to meet you when the program starts in December!
Still no word. It's been 6 weeks and 3 days since all documentation went final. Really hoping to get good news soon! I'm from the US. Hope to meet you when the program starts in December!
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Tavex
Im a Peruvian just evaluating the possibility to apply for an Executive LLM Programme and Id like to know why you have chosen this LSE programme? Its reputation is as good as the regular LLM? I know that the Executive LLM is a recently new offer at LSE, however, after obtaining the degree, is it possible to work a solicitor at a magic circle firm? Or this executive LLM is not so good considered at all in London market?
thnx!
I’m a Peruvian just evaluating the possibility to apply for an Executive LLM Programme and I’d like to know why you have chosen this LSE programme? Its reputation is as good as the regular LLM? I know that the Executive LLM is a recently new offer at LSE, however, after obtaining the degree, is it possible to work a solicitor at a magic circle firm? Or this executive LLM is not so good considered at all in London market?
thnx!
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G_27
Hi!
I just saw this programme today on LSE website. I'm interested in public international law and, in the future, i would like to work in an international organization or ngo in the field of human rights. At the moment, i can't leave my Job, so i'm considering to apply for an executive llm or distance learning llm programmes. The executive llm at LSE is a good option as you have 4 years to finish the master and it offers modules on the subject i'm interested in, not to mention that LSE is recognised globally. The problem? GBP 25000!! I think it's a lot of money and it seems there are no scholarships we can apply for, and the programme is not part of the Graduate Support Scheme. Unfortunately, my employer can't sponsor my studies. I'm still considering to apply and to find other funding options, but as Tavex i would be more than happy if you can tell why you have chosen this executive llm at LSE vs other executive/distance learning programmes, such as the llm at the University of London international programme.

Many thanks!

G.
Hi!
I just saw this programme today on LSE website. I'm interested in public international law and, in the future, i would like to work in an international organization or ngo in the field of human rights. At the moment, i can't leave my Job, so i'm considering to apply for an executive llm or distance learning llm programmes. The executive llm at LSE is a good option as you have 4 years to finish the master and it offers modules on the subject i'm interested in, not to mention that LSE is recognised globally. The problem? GBP 25000!! I think it's a lot of money and it seems there are no scholarships we can apply for, and the programme is not part of the Graduate Support Scheme. Unfortunately, my employer can't sponsor my studies. I'm still considering to apply and to find other funding options, but as Tavex i would be more than happy if you can tell why you have chosen this executive llm at LSE vs other executive/distance learning programmes, such as the llm at the University of London international programme.

Many thanks!

G.
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mrj
Hello,

Yes, I agree it is a lot of money. I suppose I was prepared to pay that much because I had applied to Oxford for their Mst in International Human Rights Law, but was not accepted. The cost of that course is around 20,000. I had also looked at doing an LLM in the US, where fees for one year are around 60,000 USD (40,000 UK pounds) so 20,000 seemed reasonable in comparison! You are right: there are no scholarships for the LSE program.

There is a shortage of distance learning LLM programs in public international law from reputable universities which may be why these 2 programs (LSE and Oxford) can charge this amount. As for the University of London program, I did look at it but my understanding is that it is entirely by distance learning. It seemed to me that a degree that required at least some on campus lectures was a better option, not only in terms of what one would learn, but also in terms of how the program would be viewed by potential employers. "Part-time" is a better label than "distance learning" in my view. Second, while LSE is apparently part of the University of London, I do not think a degree from there is viewed in the same terms as one from the LSE itself. Internationally, no one knows what the University of London is, whereas LSE has a global reputation. Does all of this justify charging double the fees? probably not, but I only plan on doing one LLM so I figured I would go for the best possible.

The other thing to bear in mind is, most LLM programs cost 10-12k in fees for one year full time, plus the cost of living expenses = 20,000 minimum, and you are (generally) not working and earning an income. Not to say that universities should be justified in charging extra for part time programs but it will not be cheaper to do it full time.

As to Tavex, while the program is called an executive LLM, this is the title of the program only. The degree says LLM on it (not executive LLM). Who knows if the program has the exact same reputation as the full time LLM seeing as it is a new program but I cannot think of any reason why it would be viewed as inferior, especially seeing as it requires attendance on campus. After all, combining work with travel to, and study in, a different country is surely something a potential employer would admire. As for job prospects from the LLM, that is always an unknown. I am already employed in the international law field so the purpose of this LLM is to add to my knowledge and to gain an additional qualification from a good univerisity after having worked for the last 8 years. Will it get me jobs I otherwise would not have been offered? That is impossible to say, but what I can say is that increasingly an LLM is viewed as standard and not having one can render you ineligible to apply for certain jobs in international law.

Hope this helps

MRJ
Hello,

Yes, I agree it is a lot of money. I suppose I was prepared to pay that much because I had applied to Oxford for their Mst in International Human Rights Law, but was not accepted. The cost of that course is around 20,000. I had also looked at doing an LLM in the US, where fees for one year are around 60,000 USD (40,000 UK pounds) so 20,000 seemed reasonable in comparison! You are right: there are no scholarships for the LSE program.

There is a shortage of distance learning LLM programs in public international law from reputable universities which may be why these 2 programs (LSE and Oxford) can charge this amount. As for the University of London program, I did look at it but my understanding is that it is entirely by distance learning. It seemed to me that a degree that required at least some on campus lectures was a better option, not only in terms of what one would learn, but also in terms of how the program would be viewed by potential employers. "Part-time" is a better label than "distance learning" in my view. Second, while LSE is apparently part of the University of London, I do not think a degree from there is viewed in the same terms as one from the LSE itself. Internationally, no one knows what the University of London is, whereas LSE has a global reputation. Does all of this justify charging double the fees? probably not, but I only plan on doing one LLM so I figured I would go for the best possible.

The other thing to bear in mind is, most LLM programs cost 10-12k in fees for one year full time, plus the cost of living expenses = 20,000 minimum, and you are (generally) not working and earning an income. Not to say that universities should be justified in charging extra for part time programs but it will not be cheaper to do it full time.

As to Tavex, while the program is called an executive LLM, this is the title of the program only. The degree says LLM on it (not executive LLM). Who knows if the program has the exact same reputation as the full time LLM seeing as it is a new program but I cannot think of any reason why it would be viewed as inferior, especially seeing as it requires attendance on campus. After all, combining work with travel to, and study in, a different country is surely something a potential employer would admire. As for job prospects from the LLM, that is always an unknown. I am already employed in the international law field so the purpose of this LLM is to add to my knowledge and to gain an additional qualification from a good univerisity after having worked for the last 8 years. Will it get me jobs I otherwise would not have been offered? That is impossible to say, but what I can say is that increasingly an LLM is viewed as standard and not having one can render you ineligible to apply for certain jobs in international law.

Hope this helps

MRJ
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G_27
Thank you Mrj for your reply!!! It's very helpful for me, you presented an interesting perspective. For instance, I would prefer to have some on campus lectures, so I can have more interaction with professors, tutors and my classmates, which I think won't be the same for an entirely distance learning programme such as the one offer by UoL. Also, another thing that makes me hesitate of LLM in UoL is the structure, you take at the end of your LLM 4 courses (with 4 modules), but I find it strange to have an LLM with just 4 courses. If I'm not mistaken, I think the structure of the Executive LLM at LSE and the MSt in IHRL at Oxford looks more like the regular LLMs. And I agree with you, we should go for the best possible. So, I'm collecting my supporting documents. In fact, I will apply to the Mst in International Human Rights Law of Oxford, too. and let's see what happens!!!

Cheers,

G.
Thank you Mrj for your reply!!! It's very helpful for me, you presented an interesting perspective. For instance, I would prefer to have some on campus lectures, so I can have more interaction with professors, tutors and my classmates, which I think won't be the same for an entirely distance learning programme such as the one offer by UoL. Also, another thing that makes me hesitate of LLM in UoL is the structure, you take at the end of your LLM 4 courses (with 4 modules), but I find it strange to have an LLM with just 4 courses. If I'm not mistaken, I think the structure of the Executive LLM at LSE and the MSt in IHRL at Oxford looks more like the regular LLMs. And I agree with you, we should go for the best possible. So, I'm collecting my supporting documents. In fact, I will apply to the Mst in International Human Rights Law of Oxford, too. and let's see what happens!!!

Cheers,

G.
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Jay19
Hi Guys. I had applied for the program more than six (6) weeks ago and am still eagerly am awaiting a reply. Anyone can share your experiences with the program? Guessing it must be fantastic given the global class profile in an intensive setting catering for full time practitioners.
Hi Guys. I had applied for the program more than six (6) weeks ago and am still eagerly am awaiting a reply. Anyone can share your experiences with the program? Guessing it must be fantastic given the global class profile in an intensive setting catering for full time practitioners.
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