Chicago v. LSE v. NYU - Banking and Financial Regulation


j.a.

Hi all!

I'd appreciate if you could give me your insight as to how Chicago, LSE and NYU compare in terms of prestige, faculty and program quality for banking and financial regulation.

I intend to do an academically oriented LLM, with an eye to pursuing doctoral studies afterwards. I'm not really concerned about location, class size or attendance cost to the extent that reputation and teaching quality is what counts most to me.

Thanks a lot!

Hi all!

I'd appreciate if you could give me your insight as to how Chicago, LSE and NYU compare in terms of prestige, faculty and program quality for banking and financial regulation.

I intend to do an academically oriented LLM, with an eye to pursuing doctoral studies afterwards. I'm not really concerned about location, class size or attendance cost to the extent that reputation and teaching quality is what counts most to me.

Thanks a lot!
quote
P_Martini

j.a.: I just wanted to reply to you since it seems that no one has.

You've presented what I fear is a very specific problem and a very nice dilemma! You might consider your future plans and where you are from. You should also look at the current year's calendar of courses, the courses expected to be offered next year and, crucially, the reputation of the professors in your area of interest. In addition, from experience, you should know that LSE's LL.M. program is only for LL.M. students. That is to say, you will not simply be attending classes with LSE undergraduate law students but be subjected to a research paper requirement, in addition to the course exam which all students (undergraduates included) must write.

Many LL.M. programs, especially North American programs, are not run separately from the undergraduate course calendar, and you should investigate whether this is the case for Chicago and NYU. (Does anyone know?) You should also consider whether it even matters to you, if that is the case.

This, as I say, really comes down to you, which is likely why no one has responded. Simply choosing between three great schools in three great cities is great, but I hope that the few considerations I have set out will give you a start.

j.a.: I just wanted to reply to you since it seems that no one has.

You've presented what I fear is a very specific problem and a very nice dilemma! You might consider your future plans and where you are from. You should also look at the current year's calendar of courses, the courses expected to be offered next year and, crucially, the reputation of the professors in your area of interest. In addition, from experience, you should know that LSE's LL.M. program is only for LL.M. students. That is to say, you will not simply be attending classes with LSE undergraduate law students but be subjected to a research paper requirement, in addition to the course exam which all students (undergraduates included) must write.

Many LL.M. programs, especially North American programs, are not run separately from the undergraduate course calendar, and you should investigate whether this is the case for Chicago and NYU. (Does anyone know?) You should also consider whether it even matters to you, if that is the case.

This, as I say, really comes down to you, which is likely why no one has responded. Simply choosing between three great schools in three great cities is great, but I hope that the few considerations I have set out will give you a start.
quote
Interalia

personally, i would go with chicago especially if you're into academics.

chicago has a great law and econs program, but maybe its just me. i prefer an inter-disciplinary work as opposed to straight up law

personally, i would go with chicago especially if you're into academics.

chicago has a great law and econs program, but maybe its just me. i prefer an inter-disciplinary work as opposed to straight up law
quote
P_Martini

chicago has a great law and econs program, but maybe its just me. i prefer an inter-disciplinary work as opposed to straight up law


I'm not arguing for LSE (and, in fact, I don't know if it's the correct decision for you, especially if you are not from North America), but I might add that LSE also claims to be inter-disciplinary. In my experience, however, whether that is true very much depends on the course you are talking about.

One aspect that Interalia's comment raises is the program's reputation for creating academics. Perhaps you could ask some of your current professors (if you are still an undergrad, which I can't remember if you are) or your referees.

<blockquote>chicago has a great law and econs program, but maybe its just me. i prefer an inter-disciplinary work as opposed to straight up law </blockquote>

I'm not arguing for LSE (and, in fact, I don't know if it's the correct decision for you, especially if you are not from North America), but I might add that LSE also claims to be inter-disciplinary. In my experience, however, whether that is true very much depends on the course you are talking about.

One aspect that Interalia's comment raises is the program's reputation for creating academics. Perhaps you could ask some of your current professors (if you are still an undergrad, which I can't remember if you are) or your referees.
quote

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