Cambridge application 2018/2019


Hey guys, I'm looking to apply for the LLM at Cambridge this year and was looking to gauge my chances of getting an offer and see how I could possibly improve them.

I have just graduated with a first class from the University of Salford. I am now beginning my BPTC in september and would want to start my LLM straight after that. As I will be applying for the international law LLM I will make sure that my references are from relevant lecturers. I have great rapport with my international law lecturer and got a first in the module. I also got firsts in other closely tied subjects such as Human Rights law and EU law (as well as public law which becomes somewhat relevant I hope). Again, I am on great terms with all of these lecturers too so that means I can get good references. I am also currently writing a journal for publication on a topic pertaining to the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations. So basically if I can get that published within time, would that increase my chances significantly? and what sort of a chance would I have without the publication?

I am also a contributor to leading English dailies in my home country of Pakistan and have blogs and columns published. These are mostly socio-political in nature however, so I'm not sure if the mention would boost my application. Any guidance on this would also be much appreciated! Thanks in advance for taking the time out to reply :)
Hey guys, I'm looking to apply for the LLM at Cambridge this year and was looking to gauge my chances of getting an offer and see how I could possibly improve them.

I have just graduated with a first class from the University of Salford. I am now beginning my BPTC in september and would want to start my LLM straight after that. As I will be applying for the international law LLM I will make sure that my references are from relevant lecturers. I have great rapport with my international law lecturer and got a first in the module. I also got firsts in other closely tied subjects such as Human Rights law and EU law (as well as public law which becomes somewhat relevant I hope). Again, I am on great terms with all of these lecturers too so that means I can get good references. I am also currently writing a journal for publication on a topic pertaining to the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations. So basically if I can get that published within time, would that increase my chances significantly? and what sort of a chance would I have without the publication?

I am also a contributor to leading English dailies in my home country of Pakistan and have blogs and columns published. These are mostly socio-political in nature however, so I'm not sure if the mention would boost my application. Any guidance on this would also be much appreciated! Thanks in advance for taking the time out to reply :)
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LegalLife
Hey guys, I'm looking to apply for the LLM at Cambridge this year and was looking to gauge my chances of getting an offer and see how I could possibly improve them.

I have just graduated with a first class from the University of Salford. I am now beginning my BPTC in september and would want to start my LLM straight after that. As I will be applying for the international law LLM I will make sure that my references are from relevant lecturers. I have great rapport with my international law lecturer and got a first in the module. I also got firsts in other closely tied subjects such as Human Rights law and EU law (as well as public law which becomes somewhat relevant I hope). Again, I am on great terms with all of these lecturers too so that means I can get good references. I am also currently writing a journal for publication on a topic pertaining to the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations. So basically if I can get that published within time, would that increase my chances significantly? and what sort of a chance would I have without the publication?

I am also a contributor to leading English dailies in my home country of Pakistan and have blogs and columns published. These are mostly socio-political in nature however, so I'm not sure if the mention would boost my application. Any guidance on this would also be much appreciated! Thanks in advance for taking the time out to reply :)



1. Cambridge does not admit to specialised LLMs. You are either admitted to the LLM or to the BCL. You can however choose to specialise in a field of law while studying. Your application form will not ask you for a specialism because again, Cambridge does not admit to specialisms but to the general LLM.

2. Cambridge is looking for a first class, very good recommendations and a good CV. If you can show these, you are highly likely to get admitted. You should feel free to include all your achievements in your CV and some in your personal statement to give them an idea of who you are.
[quote]Hey guys, I'm looking to apply for the LLM at Cambridge this year and was looking to gauge my chances of getting an offer and see how I could possibly improve them.

I have just graduated with a first class from the University of Salford. I am now beginning my BPTC in september and would want to start my LLM straight after that. As I will be applying for the international law LLM I will make sure that my references are from relevant lecturers. I have great rapport with my international law lecturer and got a first in the module. I also got firsts in other closely tied subjects such as Human Rights law and EU law (as well as public law which becomes somewhat relevant I hope). Again, I am on great terms with all of these lecturers too so that means I can get good references. I am also currently writing a journal for publication on a topic pertaining to the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations. So basically if I can get that published within time, would that increase my chances significantly? and what sort of a chance would I have without the publication?

I am also a contributor to leading English dailies in my home country of Pakistan and have blogs and columns published. These are mostly socio-political in nature however, so I'm not sure if the mention would boost my application. Any guidance on this would also be much appreciated! Thanks in advance for taking the time out to reply :)[/quote]


1. Cambridge does not admit to specialised LLMs. You are either admitted to the LLM or to the BCL. You can however choose to specialise in a field of law while studying. Your application form will not ask you for a specialism because again, Cambridge does not admit to specialisms but to the general LLM.

2. Cambridge is looking for a first class, very good recommendations and a good CV. If you can show these, you are highly likely to get admitted. You should feel free to include all your achievements in your CV and some in your personal statement to give them an idea of who you are.
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Hey guys, I'm looking to apply for the LLM at Cambridge this year and was looking to gauge my chances of getting an offer and see how I could possibly improve them.

I have just graduated with a first class from the University of Salford. I am now beginning my BPTC in september and would want to start my LLM straight after that. As I will be applying for the international law LLM I will make sure that my references are from relevant lecturers. I have great rapport with my international law lecturer and got a first in the module. I also got firsts in other closely tied subjects such as Human Rights law and EU law (as well as public law which becomes somewhat relevant I hope). Again, I am on great terms with all of these lecturers too so that means I can get good references. I am also currently writing a journal for publication on a topic pertaining to the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations. So basically if I can get that published within time, would that increase my chances significantly? and what sort of a chance would I have without the publication?

I am also a contributor to leading English dailies in my home country of Pakistan and have blogs and columns published. These are mostly socio-political in nature however, so I'm not sure if the mention would boost my application. Any guidance on this would also be much appreciated! Thanks in advance for taking the time out to reply :)



1. Cambridge does not admit to specialised LLMs. You are either admitted to the LLM or to the BCL. You can however choose to specialise in a field of law while studying. Your application form will not ask you for a specialism because again, Cambridge does not admit to specialisms but to the general LLM.

2. Cambridge is looking for a first class, very good recommendations and a good CV. If you can show these, you are highly likely to get admitted. You should feel free to include all your achievements in your CV and some in your personal statement to give them an idea of who you are.


Hey, thanks for correcting me on the nature of the course. Besides that, do you think I have a fair chance? Is it worth applying?
[quote][quote]Hey guys, I'm looking to apply for the LLM at Cambridge this year and was looking to gauge my chances of getting an offer and see how I could possibly improve them.

I have just graduated with a first class from the University of Salford. I am now beginning my BPTC in september and would want to start my LLM straight after that. As I will be applying for the international law LLM I will make sure that my references are from relevant lecturers. I have great rapport with my international law lecturer and got a first in the module. I also got firsts in other closely tied subjects such as Human Rights law and EU law (as well as public law which becomes somewhat relevant I hope). Again, I am on great terms with all of these lecturers too so that means I can get good references. I am also currently writing a journal for publication on a topic pertaining to the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations. So basically if I can get that published within time, would that increase my chances significantly? and what sort of a chance would I have without the publication?

I am also a contributor to leading English dailies in my home country of Pakistan and have blogs and columns published. These are mostly socio-political in nature however, so I'm not sure if the mention would boost my application. Any guidance on this would also be much appreciated! Thanks in advance for taking the time out to reply :)[/quote]


1. Cambridge does not admit to specialised LLMs. You are either admitted to the LLM or to the BCL. You can however choose to specialise in a field of law while studying. Your application form will not ask you for a specialism because again, Cambridge does not admit to specialisms but to the general LLM.

2. Cambridge is looking for a first class, very good recommendations and a good CV. If you can show these, you are highly likely to get admitted. You should feel free to include all your achievements in your CV and some in your personal statement to give them an idea of who you are.
[/quote]

Hey, thanks for correcting me on the nature of the course. Besides that, do you think I have a fair chance? Is it worth applying?
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Hi, I have a question if anyones wants to help:
On the online system I see the "reasons for applying" and "statement of interest" being asked as two separate questions each consisting of around 750 words. I do however find it hard to see a clear distinction between the two and I cannot seem to find a lot of information about what each of them is really asking individually. Could anyone shed some light on this? Thank you!
Hi, I have a question if anyones wants to help:
On the online system I see the "reasons for applying" and "statement of interest" being asked as two separate questions each consisting of around 750 words. I do however find it hard to see a clear distinction between the two and I cannot seem to find a lot of information about what each of them is really asking individually. Could anyone shed some light on this? Thank you!
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I'm also looking to apply for the LLM at Cambridge. I agree that a 1.1, outstanding CV & personal statement and good references are what makes you a potential candidate.

As most who apply will already have a 1.1, a great emphasis is placed on your personal statement, if you can tell them why you want to study at Cambridge, and why LLM and if you portray this in a clear, creative and unique way you will most likely get an offer. Also, I think it's a good idea to put ALL your work experiences on your CV (or mention them somewhere in your application) - whether they are law-related or not.

For Cambridge - the 'statement of interest' and 'reason for applying' is their version of a personal statement (both 1500 characters each) I'm not sure but I think for the statement of interest they're looking for an answer to 'what do you want to do (career-wise/career ambitions etc) and the reasons for applying is 'why Cambridge LLM'... Again I'm not sure if this distinction is correct or not. Correct me if I'm wrong as I also am looking to apply :)
I'm also looking to apply for the LLM at Cambridge. I agree that a 1.1, outstanding CV & personal statement and good references are what makes you a potential candidate.

As most who apply will already have a 1.1, a great emphasis is placed on your personal statement, if you can tell them why you want to study at Cambridge, and why LLM and if you portray this in a clear, creative and unique way you will most likely get an offer. Also, I think it's a good idea to put ALL your work experiences on your CV (or mention them somewhere in your application) - whether they are law-related or not.

For Cambridge - the 'statement of interest' and 'reason for applying' is their version of a personal statement (both 1500 characters each) I'm not sure but I think for the statement of interest they're looking for an answer to 'what do you want to do (career-wise/career ambitions etc) and the reasons for applying is 'why Cambridge LLM'... Again I'm not sure if this distinction is correct or not. Correct me if I'm wrong as I also am looking to apply :)
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Hi,

I am also applying to the LLM. I'm currently working on my application and got some tips from tutor (lecturer) who is an LLM alum.

So, Statement of interest : why you want Cambridge, why the LLM, what you want from the degree. Tell them why you are interested.

Reason for applying: what you want to study, relevant work experiences, how they fit in with the course, how do you fit in to the course and university, what you have accomplished (interset, mooting, probono).

My approach. Hope that helps
Hi,

I am also applying to the LLM. I'm currently working on my application and got some tips from tutor (lecturer) who is an LLM alum.

So, Statement of interest : why you want Cambridge, why the LLM, what you want from the degree. Tell them why you are interested.

Reason for applying: what you want to study, relevant work experiences, how they fit in with the course, how do you fit in to the course and university, what you have accomplished (interset, mooting, probono).

My approach. Hope that helps
quote
nx123
Hi,

I am also applying to the LLM. I'm currently working on my application and got some tips from tutor (lecturer) who is an LLM alum.

So, Statement of interest : why you want Cambridge, why the LLM, what you want from the degree. Tell them why you are interested.

Reason for applying: what you want to study, relevant work experiences, how they fit in with the course, how do you fit in to the course and university, what you have accomplished (interset, mooting, probono).

My approach. Hope that helps


Thanks for your answer. I am also an applicant for the 2018 intake but I am still a bit confused.

After trawling through the Cambridge website I found this in the FAQ/Other Information section:

"Reasons for applying/statement of interest

To help differentiate yourself from other applicants, you should use this question to provide additional information about why you have chosen to apply for a course at the University of Cambridge and why you have applied for this course in particular.

So based on Cambridge's website, it seems like that the Statement of Interest/Reasons for Applying is a way to answer two questions:

1) Why you have chosen to apply for A course AT Cambridge? (As Phoenix's lecturer suggested this might mean: why you want Cambridge, why the LLM, what you want from the degree. Tell them why you are interested.)

2) Why have you applied for THIS course in particular? (As Phoenix's lecturer suggested this might mean addressing how you fit into the LLM in particular)

I am assuming that question 1 should be answered in Statement of Interest and question 2 in Reasons for Applying. This is consistent with Phoenix's lecturer's suggestion but any further insights appreciated given that the above two questions are completely interchangeable with the titles 'Reasons for Applying'/'Statement of Interest'.
[quote]Hi,

I am also applying to the LLM. I'm currently working on my application and got some tips from tutor (lecturer) who is an LLM alum.

So, Statement of interest : why you want Cambridge, why the LLM, what you want from the degree. Tell them why you are interested.

Reason for applying: what you want to study, relevant work experiences, how they fit in with the course, how do you fit in to the course and university, what you have accomplished (interset, mooting, probono).

My approach. Hope that helps [/quote]

Thanks for your answer. I am also an applicant for the 2018 intake but I am still a bit confused.

After trawling through the Cambridge website I found this in the FAQ/Other Information section:

"Reasons for applying/statement of interest

To help differentiate yourself from other applicants, you should use this question to provide additional information about why you have chosen to apply for a course at the University of Cambridge and why you have applied for this course in particular.

So based on Cambridge's website, it seems like that the Statement of Interest/Reasons for Applying is a way to answer two questions:

1) Why you have chosen to apply for A course AT Cambridge? (As Phoenix's lecturer suggested this might mean: why you want Cambridge, why the LLM, what you want from the degree. Tell them why you are interested.)

2) Why have you applied for THIS course in particular? (As Phoenix's lecturer suggested this might mean addressing how you fit into the LLM in particular)

I am assuming that question 1 should be answered in Statement of Interest and question 2 in Reasons for Applying. This is consistent with Phoenix's lecturer's suggestion but any further insights appreciated given that the above two questions are completely interchangeable with the titles 'Reasons for Applying'/'Statement of Interest'.
quote
nx123
PS/FYI I am not sure if most of you are aware but there is also a question addressing 'Career Goals' so make sure to get that prepared before you fill out the application :-)
PS/FYI I am not sure if most of you are aware but there is also a question addressing 'Career Goals' so make sure to get that prepared before you fill out the application :-)
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PS/FYI I am not sure if most of you are aware but there is also a question addressing 'Career Goals' so make sure to get that prepared before you fill out the application :-)


Yeah, I just noticed this. How did you split up the questions between Reasons for Applying/Statement of Interest/Career Goals.

Thanks!
[quote]PS/FYI I am not sure if most of you are aware but there is also a question addressing 'Career Goals' so make sure to get that prepared before you fill out the application :-)[/quote]

Yeah, I just noticed this. How did you split up the questions between Reasons for Applying/Statement of Interest/Career Goals.

Thanks!
quote
PS/FYI I am not sure if most of you are aware but there is also a question addressing 'Career Goals' so make sure to get that prepared before you fill out the application :-)


Yeah, I just noticed this. How did you split up the questions between Reasons for Applying/Statement of Interest/Career Goals.

Thanks!



I gave my reason for applying in the first question. And then acclaimed them and things I liked about the degree, university and structure.

Second question was harder due to limited word count. I linked my undergrad studies, relevant work experience and interest together and answered by saying: here is why I would be a suitable candidate for the LLM. So, the second one is was personal, so a lot more involved.

Also, you can get into Cambridge with a 2.1 . Just you just need a perfect application, good experience and strong references.

Career goal. Tell them what you want to do in the future. Be creative here. Don't just say I want to be a barrister and end it there. Link it in with the Llm. How it will facilitate your ambition to be a practioner, specialising in this and this area of law. They want leaders of the Futures in whatever area you go into.
[quote][quote]PS/FYI I am not sure if most of you are aware but there is also a question addressing 'Career Goals' so make sure to get that prepared before you fill out the application :-)[/quote]

Yeah, I just noticed this. How did you split up the questions between Reasons for Applying/Statement of Interest/Career Goals.

Thanks![/quote]


I gave my reason for applying in the first question. And then acclaimed them and things I liked about the degree, university and structure.

Second question was harder due to limited word count. I linked my undergrad studies, relevant work experience and interest together and answered by saying: here is why I would be a suitable candidate for the LLM. So, the second one is was personal, so a lot more involved.

Also, you can get into Cambridge with a 2.1 . Just you just need a perfect application, good experience and strong references.

Career goal. Tell them what you want to do in the future. Be creative here. Don't just say I want to be a barrister and end it there. Link it in with the Llm. How it will facilitate your ambition to be a practioner, specialising in this and this area of law. They want leaders of the Futures in whatever area you go into.
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