BCL application 2014 - 2015


Lucien1910
Hi everyone

I thought I should begin a thread in respect of applications for the BCL for the academic year 2014 - 2015.

Has anyone begun the online application yet?
Hi everyone

I thought I should begin a thread in respect of applications for the BCL for the academic year 2014 - 2015.

Has anyone begun the online application yet?
quote
Mark W
Yes, I've started it, but I don't have a 2000 word essay that I'm really happy with yet so I've put it on hold again until that's finished.

I'm going to apply to St John's College
Yes, I've started it, but I don't have a 2000 word essay that I'm really happy with yet so I've put it on hold again until that's finished.

I'm going to apply to St John's College
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Lucien1910
Great! I've completed most of my application and am currently in the process of finalising my essay. I am applying to St' John's as well. What will your focus be?
Great! I've completed most of my application and am currently in the process of finalising my essay. I am applying to St' John's as well. What will your focus be?
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Mark W
Will probably pick Restitution, Commercial Remedies, Conflict of Laws and one other. Not worrying about it too much at present as probably won't get in anyway! :)
Will probably pick Restitution, Commercial Remedies, Conflict of Laws and one other. Not worrying about it too much at present as probably won't get in anyway! :)
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Lucien1910
Ok, great. I have chosen courses which have a commercial law slant as well. Why are you uncertain about admission?
Ok, great. I have chosen courses which have a commercial law slant as well. Why are you uncertain about admission?
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Mark W
Ok, great. I have chosen courses which have a commercial law slant as well. Why are you uncertain about admission?


Well, firstly I think almost no-one should be really really confident about getting on the BCL. If you have the top first in your year from Oxford, Cambridge etc then probably pretty close to a shoo-in but otherwise, there is still some chance that they don't take you, I think.

Secondly I am particularly uncertain because I would not be the typical BCL candidate. I am a mature student, in my mid 30s and because I work full time my undergrad degree is a part-time evening course at a low-ranked UK university. Therefore admissions might think I am too much of a gamble even though my module grades are excellent and my references will probably also be excellent (fingers crossed).
<blockquote>Ok, great. I have chosen courses which have a commercial law slant as well. Why are you uncertain about admission?
</blockquote>

Well, firstly I think almost no-one should be really really confident about getting on the BCL. If you have the top first in your year from Oxford, Cambridge etc then probably pretty close to a shoo-in but otherwise, there is still some chance that they don't take you, I think.

Secondly I am particularly uncertain because I would not be the typical BCL candidate. I am a mature student, in my mid 30s and because I work full time my undergrad degree is a part-time evening course at a low-ranked UK university. Therefore admissions might think I am too much of a gamble even though my module grades are excellent and my references will probably also be excellent (fingers crossed).

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misgab
Hey guys!

How are your essays going? Any tips on how to keep within the word limit and still have an impressive essay? Is there a page limit for CVs?
Again, what style did you adopt for your personal statement? I'm thinking that since the application guide sets out a checklist of stuff they want to see in the PS one shd just go straight to the point. But some sites I've seen advice us to have a catchy opening, like an anecdote. How can all that fit in within 500 words? And then do you say stuff about yourself that's already in your CV?
I know these are a lot of questions but I'll appreciate your comments.
Thanks.
Hey guys!

How are your essays going? Any tips on how to keep within the word limit and still have an impressive essay? Is there a page limit for CVs?
Again, what style did you adopt for your personal statement? I'm thinking that since the application guide sets out a checklist of stuff they want to see in the PS one shd just go straight to the point. But some sites I've seen advice us to have a catchy opening, like an anecdote. How can all that fit in within 500 words? And then do you say stuff about yourself that's already in your CV?
I know these are a lot of questions but I'll appreciate your comments.
Thanks.
quote
Chinaman
Hi,
You guys have started on your applications, and I am also ready with mine.
I was just wondering if I should keep it on hold for a bit. Are there really any advantages to applying early (to my knowlege Oxford does not have rolling applications?).
Also, with a 2.1 (but a good CV and excellent references) should I even bother applying?
Hi,
You guys have started on your applications, and I am also ready with mine.
I was just wondering if I should keep it on hold for a bit. Are there really any advantages to applying early (to my knowlege Oxford does not have rolling applications?).
Also, with a 2.1 (but a good CV and excellent references) should I even bother applying?
quote
Chinaman
Hey guys!

Again, what style did you adopt for your personal statement? I'm thinking that since the application guide sets out a checklist of stuff they want to see in the PS one shd just go straight to the point. But some sites I've seen advice us to have a catchy opening, like an anecdote. How can all that fit in within 500 words? And then do you say stuff about yourself that's already in your CV?

About the personal statement, and anecdotes, I feel that unless one has some remarkable anecdote that is very telling of their work or commitment, there is no point in wasting to much space with one. But I suppose we should make sure the first line is intriguing or evokes interest.
(The whole message seems to be coming as a quote, my apologies, I am unable to fix that)
<blockquote>Hey guys!

Again, what style did you adopt for your personal statement? I'm thinking that since the application guide sets out a checklist of stuff they want to see in the PS one shd just go straight to the point. But some sites I've seen advice us to have a catchy opening, like an anecdote. How can all that fit in within 500 words? And then do you say stuff about yourself that's already in your CV?

About the personal statement, and anecdotes, I feel that unless one has some remarkable anecdote that is very telling of their work or commitment, there is no point in wasting to much space with one. But I suppose we should make sure the first line is intriguing or evokes interest.
(The whole message seems to be coming as a quote, my apologies, I am unable to fix that)
quote
Mark W
Hi,
You guys have started on your applications, and I am also ready with mine.
I was just wondering if I should keep it on hold for a bit. Are there really any advantages to applying early (to my knowlege Oxford does not have rolling applications?).
Also, with a 2.1 (but a good CV and excellent references) should I even bother applying?


1) I don't think it makes the slightest difference when you apply so long as it is by the deadline. But if you have finished the application already then why not submit it?

2) I have heard that a few Oxford grads got in with 2:1s but they were probably predicted Firsts, offered places on that basis, and then managed to negotiate their way on to the course when they very narrowly missed. From all the posts I have seen, except in that one circumstance, the chances of getting in with a 2:1 are essentially zero. But if the £50 application fee doesn't mean much to you then it can't hurt to apply...
<blockquote>Hi,
You guys have started on your applications, and I am also ready with mine.
I was just wondering if I should keep it on hold for a bit. Are there really any advantages to applying early (to my knowlege Oxford does not have rolling applications?).
Also, with a 2.1 (but a good CV and excellent references) should I even bother applying? </blockquote>

1) I don't think it makes the slightest difference when you apply so long as it is by the deadline. But if you have finished the application already then why not submit it?

2) I have heard that a few Oxford grads got in with 2:1s but they were probably predicted Firsts, offered places on that basis, and then managed to negotiate their way on to the course when they very narrowly missed. From all the posts I have seen, except in that one circumstance, the chances of getting in with a 2:1 are essentially zero. But if the £50 application fee doesn't mean much to you then it can't hurt to apply...
quote
Chinaman
I suppose keeping my essay and personal statement with me, lets me have a re-look at it later. Maybe with the space of a few weeks one has fresher ideas.
Unfortunately, 50 pounds is a lot of money. Anyway, I guess I will take a chance on it.
Thank you for the prompt reply though!
I suppose keeping my essay and personal statement with me, lets me have a re-look at it later. Maybe with the space of a few weeks one has fresher ideas.
Unfortunately, 50 pounds is a lot of money. Anyway, I guess I will take a chance on it.
Thank you for the prompt reply though!
quote
anshul218
Hey how much weightage does a reference carry if its from a visiting faculty at law school? And what if the faculty has taught you for 4 years and knows you well?
Hey how much weightage does a reference carry if its from a visiting faculty at law school? And what if the faculty has taught you for 4 years and knows you well?
quote
Quick quiestion... Please don't think I'm stupid... but I come from a common law country and yet I accidently applied to the MJur and no the BCL.

1) Is there any real difference between the two programs? Does it matter if you apply to one or the other?

2) Have my chances for being accepted to the MJur worsened by the fact that I come from a common law country? are there, to your knoweldge, any common law country of origin students who take the MJur? And again does it even matter?

3. Do any of you know if I can switch from MJur to BCL during the year? Given that all the courses are taught together anyway.. why not?

Thanks in advance for the help...
Quick quiestion... Please don't think I'm stupid... but I come from a common law country and yet I accidently applied to the MJur and no the BCL.

1) Is there any real difference between the two programs? Does it matter if you apply to one or the other?

2) Have my chances for being accepted to the MJur worsened by the fact that I come from a common law country? are there, to your knoweldge, any common law country of origin students who take the MJur? And again does it even matter?

3. Do any of you know if I can switch from MJur to BCL during the year? Given that all the courses are taught together anyway.. why not?

Thanks in advance for the help...
quote
Mark W

2) Have my chances for being accepted to the MJur worsened by the fact that I come from a common law country? are there, to your knoweldge, any common law country of origin students who take the MJur? And again does it even matter?


So far as I know, there is zero chance of you being accepted on to the MJur as a student from a common law country. The MJur is solely for students from civil law countries.

Probably they will realise that you made a mistake and consider your application for the correct program, but why take that chance? Just contact admissions and tell them you accidentally selected MJur when you meant BCL and see if they can change it for you?
<blockquote>
2) Have my chances for being accepted to the MJur worsened by the fact that I come from a common law country? are there, to your knoweldge, any common law country of origin students who take the MJur? And again does it even matter?
</blockquote>

So far as I know, there is zero chance of you being accepted on to the MJur as a student from a common law country. The MJur is solely for students from civil law countries.

Probably they will realise that you made a mistake and consider your application for the correct program, but why take that chance? Just contact admissions and tell them you accidentally selected MJur when you meant BCL and see if they can change it for you?
quote
I already did that and sent them an email thinking they will respond by either saying "thanks for catching that we will be happy to make that change for you" or even go as far as saying "we already noticed the mistake and corrected it on your behalf". But no, they responded with the following laconic statement:

"Thank you for your enquiry. I am very sorry to say that it is not possible for the Graduate Admissions Office to amend your choice of programme after you have submitted your application, therefore your application will be considered by the Law faculty for a place on the Magister Juris."

I applied to a lot of schools, both in the UK and the US, and Oxford isn't even my first choice, so to be honest with you - if thats how they treat an applicant who has made an extremely technical mistake but is otherwise wholly suitable for their program - then fine, I won't go there. Oxford is the only school, out of the 13 top law school I've applied to, which works based on this cumbersome system of BCLs/MJurs - I did a mistake for which I take full responsibility, by not reading carefully the difference between the two programs - but that should not be the response.

Anyway thanks for the help...
I already did that and sent them an email thinking they will respond by either saying "thanks for catching that we will be happy to make that change for you" or even go as far as saying "we already noticed the mistake and corrected it on your behalf". But no, they responded with the following laconic statement:

"Thank you for your enquiry. I am very sorry to say that it is not possible for the Graduate Admissions Office to amend your choice of programme after you have submitted your application, therefore your application will be considered by the Law faculty for a place on the Magister Juris."

I applied to a lot of schools, both in the UK and the US, and Oxford isn't even my first choice, so to be honest with you - if thats how they treat an applicant who has made an extremely technical mistake but is otherwise wholly suitable for their program - then fine, I won't go there. Oxford is the only school, out of the 13 top law school I've applied to, which works based on this cumbersome system of BCLs/MJurs - I did a mistake for which I take full responsibility, by not reading carefully the difference between the two programs - but that should not be the response.

Anyway thanks for the help...
quote
Mac23
I already did that and sent them an email thinking they will respond by either saying "thanks for catching that we will be happy to make that change for you" or even go as far as saying "we already noticed the mistake and corrected it on your behalf". But no, they responded with the following laconic statement:

"Thank you for your enquiry. I am very sorry to say that it is not possible for the Graduate Admissions Office to amend your choice of programme after you have submitted your application, therefore your application will be considered by the Law faculty for a place on the Magister Juris."

I applied to a lot of schools, both in the UK and the US, and Oxford isn't even my first choice, so to be honest with you - if thats how they treat an applicant who has made an extremely technical mistake but is otherwise wholly suitable for their program - then fine, I won't go there. Oxford is the only school, out of the 13 top law school I've applied to, which works based on this cumbersome system of BCLs/MJurs - I did a mistake for which I take full responsibility, by not reading carefully the difference between the two programs - but that should not be the response.

Anyway thanks for the help...


I think you can apply for the BCL as well. Clearly they will not admit you to the MJur, but they may admit you to the BCL..so apply for it. You have enough time, since the deadline is toward the end of January if I'm not wrong.
<blockquote>I already did that and sent them an email thinking they will respond by either saying "thanks for catching that we will be happy to make that change for you" or even go as far as saying "we already noticed the mistake and corrected it on your behalf". But no, they responded with the following laconic statement:

"Thank you for your enquiry. I am very sorry to say that it is not possible for the Graduate Admissions Office to amend your choice of programme after you have submitted your application, therefore your application will be considered by the Law faculty for a place on the Magister Juris."

I applied to a lot of schools, both in the UK and the US, and Oxford isn't even my first choice, so to be honest with you - if thats how they treat an applicant who has made an extremely technical mistake but is otherwise wholly suitable for their program - then fine, I won't go there. Oxford is the only school, out of the 13 top law school I've applied to, which works based on this cumbersome system of BCLs/MJurs - I did a mistake for which I take full responsibility, by not reading carefully the difference between the two programs - but that should not be the response.

Anyway thanks for the help...</blockquote>

I think you can apply for the BCL as well. Clearly they will not admit you to the MJur, but they may admit you to the BCL..so apply for it. You have enough time, since the deadline is toward the end of January if I'm not wrong.
quote
Chinaman
Yeah, I bet that is what they want.
But doesn't it seem a little unfair and I daresay exploitative? (Since it means twice the application fees?)
Yeah, I bet that is what they want.
But doesn't it seem a little unfair and I daresay exploitative? (Since it means twice the application fees?)
quote
I talked to the guys at the Law School (As opposed to Graduate Admissions who were clueless apparently) and they sorted it out in a matter of minutes. I am now applying for the BCL instead of the MJur. Thanks a lot for all of your help.

But I got to say, that I still don't understand the difference between the two programs. They are identical. What is the point of giving different names based off of a legal tradition? Especially in our globalized world are there really countries who are purely common law and purely civil? Its kinda silly.. This is especially true given the fact that the LL.M. is for students of all backgrounds and the idea is that we could benefit from each of our collective knoweldge and experience - why make these technical seperations?
I talked to the guys at the Law School (As opposed to Graduate Admissions who were clueless apparently) and they sorted it out in a matter of minutes. I am now applying for the BCL instead of the MJur. Thanks a lot for all of your help.

But I got to say, that I still don't understand the difference between the two programs. They are identical. What is the point of giving different names based off of a legal tradition? Especially in our globalized world are there really countries who are purely common law and purely civil? Its kinda silly.. This is especially true given the fact that the LL.M. is for students of all backgrounds and the idea is that we could benefit from each of our collective knoweldge and experience - why make these technical seperations?
quote
Mark W
I talked to the guys at the Law School (As opposed to Graduate Admissions who were clueless apparently) and they sorted it out in a matter of minutes. I am now applying for the BCL instead of the MJur. Thanks a lot for all of your help.

But I got to say, that I still don't understand the difference between the two programs. They are identical. What is the point of giving different names based off of a legal tradition? Especially in our globalized world are there really countries who are purely common law and purely civil? Its kinda silly.. This is especially true given the fact that the LL.M. is for students of all backgrounds and the idea is that we could benefit from each of our collective knoweldge and experience - why make these technical seperations?


Graduate Admissions at Oxford are a little unhelpful in my experience. I go to a low-ranked university in the UK, which wasn't even on the drop-down list of institutions to select from. They told me to enter it as 'Overseas - Other' (!) as that is the only way to choose a university not on the list. They didn't seem to like my suggestion of simply adding it to their incomplete list...

I don't think the BCL/MJur separation stops students benefitting from collective knowledge / experience - the classes are taken together and the exams at the end are identical. The only difference as I can see it is that MJur students have the option to study one module from the undergraduate course - BCL students cannot do so.
<blockquote>I talked to the guys at the Law School (As opposed to Graduate Admissions who were clueless apparently) and they sorted it out in a matter of minutes. I am now applying for the BCL instead of the MJur. Thanks a lot for all of your help.

But I got to say, that I still don't understand the difference between the two programs. They are identical. What is the point of giving different names based off of a legal tradition? Especially in our globalized world are there really countries who are purely common law and purely civil? Its kinda silly.. This is especially true given the fact that the LL.M. is for students of all backgrounds and the idea is that we could benefit from each of our collective knoweldge and experience - why make these technical seperations?</blockquote>

Graduate Admissions at Oxford are a little unhelpful in my experience. I go to a low-ranked university in the UK, which wasn't even on the drop-down list of institutions to select from. They told me to enter it as 'Overseas - Other' (!) as that is the only way to choose a university not on the list. They didn't seem to like my suggestion of simply adding it to their incomplete list...

I don't think the BCL/MJur separation stops students benefitting from collective knowledge / experience - the classes are taken together and the exams at the end are identical. The only difference as I can see it is that MJur students have the option to study one module from the undergraduate course - BCL students cannot do so.
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Bish2
Hey everyone. I go to a mid-level UK University. I graduated with a first (74%) but managed only a 2.1 for my first 2 years. I´m not sure how much this damages my chances! I´m also struggling with the personal statement. Right now mine is at almost 900 words. Would it be too cheeky to lower the font size and squeeze it into about a page?!
Hey everyone. I go to a mid-level UK University. I graduated with a first (74%) but managed only a 2.1 for my first 2 years. I´m not sure how much this damages my chances! I´m also struggling with the personal statement. Right now mine is at almost 900 words. Would it be too cheeky to lower the font size and squeeze it into about a page?!
quote

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