Question about Northwesterns 2 yrd JD Program


I found out that Northwestern has a 2 yrd JD program.

They require applicants to take the LSAT, but does anyone know if they require a certain LSAT score ?
I found out that Northwestern has a 2 yrd JD program.

They require applicants to take the LSAT, but does anyone know if they require a certain LSAT score ?


quote
quentin
Dear Bladerunner,
I've been told that the admmissions commitee doesn't require the same LSAT score as domestic law students. I think that if you -international- get above 160, you will be fine...
best
Dear Bladerunner,
I've been told that the admmissions commitee doesn't require the same LSAT score as domestic law students. I think that if you -international- get above 160, you will be fine...
best
quote
zakatala
Dear Quentin

It is interesting to hear that foreign lawyers are not expected of the same LSAT scores. Is it really true? I dont mean to suggest that your post is incorrect, but I always thought that the expectations for LSAT score would be the same for foreigners (ie - very high).

For example, i recently inquiried UPenn and, although i did not ask if i could apply with lower score, the response was such that everybody gets the same scrutiny.

So would be greatful if you could elaborate more on this issue.

thanks,
Dear Quentin

It is interesting to hear that foreign lawyers are not expected of the same LSAT scores. Is it really true? I dont mean to suggest that your post is incorrect, but I always thought that the expectations for LSAT score would be the same for foreigners (ie - very high).

For example, i recently inquiried UPenn and, although i did not ask if i could apply with lower score, the response was such that everybody gets the same scrutiny.

So would be greatful if you could elaborate more on this issue.

thanks,
quote
hannenyh
I am pretty sure this only applies to NU's program, and not ALL JD programs. If you want to try to get into other programs than those specifically made for international applicants like the one at NU, you will probably have to score within their average of the school's LSAT scores, if not better, since it is very hard for the school to calculate your (international) GPA.

I am currently studying for the LSAT. No fun!
I am pretty sure this only applies to NU's program, and not ALL JD programs. If you want to try to get into other programs than those specifically made for international applicants like the one at NU, you will probably have to score within their average of the school's LSAT scores, if not better, since it is very hard for the school to calculate your (international) GPA.

I am currently studying for the LSAT. No fun!
quote
richardvf
Hi Hannenyh,

I see you are studying for the LSAT and planning on applying to law schools for the J.D. Will the one year you attended Wake Forest for your LL.M count toward the three year J.D. requirement?
Hi Hannenyh,

I see you are studying for the LSAT and planning on applying to law schools for the J.D. Will the one year you attended Wake Forest for your LL.M count toward the three year J.D. requirement?
quote
hannenyh
Good question. I wish I had the answer. I think it might in several schools, but then I can wave goodbye to any scholarships based on a high LSAT score, and since the sole reason I went to WFU and not a higher ranked school, was the affordable living, fee waivers and tuition waiver... so... The thing is that if you apply as a transfer student then they don't have to report your LSAT score, and have no real incentive to give you money to attend their school. Still though, I might be able to transfer credits at a later time, or I might just suck it up and go part time and work or get the loans to pay for the two years. I am not applying till 2009 at the earliest though, so I have still have time to figure all this out. Oh, and getting in as a transfer student seems to be a pain in the rear end. I finished in roughly the top 15-20% at WFU (they wont rank me), and when I looked around that will not cut it at most t14 schools, even with lots of good soft factors. Time will show I guess.
Good question. I wish I had the answer. I think it might in several schools, but then I can wave goodbye to any scholarships based on a high LSAT score, and since the sole reason I went to WFU and not a higher ranked school, was the affordable living, fee waivers and tuition waiver... so... The thing is that if you apply as a transfer student then they don't have to report your LSAT score, and have no real incentive to give you money to attend their school. Still though, I might be able to transfer credits at a later time, or I might just suck it up and go part time and work or get the loans to pay for the two years. I am not applying till 2009 at the earliest though, so I have still have time to figure all this out. Oh, and getting in as a transfer student seems to be a pain in the rear end. I finished in roughly the top 15-20% at WFU (they wont rank me), and when I looked around that will not cut it at most t14 schools, even with lots of good soft factors. Time will show I guess.
quote
elchamo
I went to the northwestern interview for the 2 year JD program and they told me that the median LSAT score for the foreign lawyers was 158 for the period 2006-2007.
I went to the northwestern interview for the 2 year JD program and they told me that the median LSAT score for the foreign lawyers was 158 for the period 2006-2007.
quote
Hi Elchamo,
I'm wondering if you can tell us a bit about the interview- how many people interviewed you, how you found the process...
Thanks!
Hi Elchamo,
I'm wondering if you can tell us a bit about the interview- how many people interviewed you, how you found the process...
Thanks!
quote
elchamo
the interview was conducted by one of the members of admissions. The interview was very similar to a job interview, what have you done since you graduate, why you studied law, why you wanna study law in the US, what you gonna do with a JD, name your biggest weakness/strength, etc. I mean if you have interviewed before this should not be difficult. The lady interviewing me told me that every year 50 people or so apply and that they choose between 10-15 candidates, and that last year just 8 people matriculated, and he median LSAT for those people they chose was 158. I don't know if I got in yet, honestly I don't think so. If you need more details or info let me know.
the interview was conducted by one of the members of admissions. The interview was very similar to a job interview, what have you done since you graduate, why you studied law, why you wanna study law in the US, what you gonna do with a JD, name your biggest weakness/strength, etc. I mean if you have interviewed before this should not be difficult. The lady interviewing me told me that every year 50 people or so apply and that they choose between 10-15 candidates, and that last year just 8 people matriculated, and he median LSAT for those people they chose was 158. I don't know if I got in yet, honestly I don't think so. If you need more details or info let me know.
quote
elchamo
I forgot to add that my interview was in person and that the lady told me that since the programs is for foreigners and since they understand that many of the applicants are from non-English speaking countries they did not expect a great LSAT score, that's the reason a 158 points in the LSAT will suffice. I don't know if you have taken the LSAT but let me tell you even for my American born and raise friends a 158 is tough. I suggest you that besides Northwestern you should apply to regular JD programs, and if you have the qualifications to get into Northwestern you should apply to school better ranked too. You see 1 year more is nothing, and I think that in this program at Northwestern they won't give you a break since you are competing against foreigners like you. To conclude, apply to this program and apply to other programs.
I forgot to add that my interview was in person and that the lady told me that since the programs is for foreigners and since they understand that many of the applicants are from non-English speaking countries they did not expect a great LSAT score, that's the reason a 158 points in the LSAT will suffice. I don't know if you have taken the LSAT but let me tell you even for my American born and raise friends a 158 is tough. I suggest you that besides Northwestern you should apply to regular JD programs, and if you have the qualifications to get into Northwestern you should apply to school better ranked too. You see 1 year more is nothing, and I think that in this program at Northwestern they won't give you a break since you are competing against foreigners like you. To conclude, apply to this program and apply to other programs.
quote
That was really helpful, Elchamo. Thanks for the tips!
That was really helpful, Elchamo. Thanks for the tips!
quote
citizen1
Elchamo,

Do you know what law school rank/GPA/or percentage (e.g. top 15%) is required for competitive applicants to the NU 2 year JD program? Thanks in advance.
Elchamo,

Do you know what law school rank/GPA/or percentage (e.g. top 15%) is required for competitive applicants to the NU 2 year JD program? Thanks in advance.
quote
elchamo
In this particular case they haven't posted any information in their web site neither I got any from mi interviewer. But I will say that they will expect the best of the best, that is my personal appreciation after reviewing the facts and statistics for regular JD admission at this school. I'm sorry I cannot help you with my answers. If I was you I will prepare for the LSAT the best you can, because it seems that LSAT scores are the most important factor when it comes to Law School admissions
In this particular case they haven't posted any information in their web site neither I got any from mi interviewer. But I will say that they will expect the best of the best, that is my personal appreciation after reviewing the facts and statistics for regular JD admission at this school. I'm sorry I cannot help you with my answers. If I was you I will prepare for the LSAT the best you can, because it seems that LSAT scores are the most important factor when it comes to Law School admissions
quote
citizen1
Thanks for the speedy response and all the best in your application.
Thanks for the speedy response and all the best in your application.
quote

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