Accelerated JD instead of an LLM?


Brent815
Why pursue a LLM when you could earn a JD?

Arizona Law has recently reduced the tuition and fees for its 2-year accelerated JD to $26,000 per year. This program allows those with a non-U.S. law degrees to earn a JD in only two years - and for a total cost not much more (and in some cases less) than many students invest for an LLM. Those holding a non-U.S. law degree and a U.S. LLM, can earn a JD in only three semesters.

A JD offers many advantages to an LLM including:

Access to the bar exam in all 50 states
The same foundational training provided to U.S. students, ensuring a deeper understanding of American legal principles and processes, necessary for both the practice of law and bar passage.
Significantly enhanced employment opportunities, as you will be a fully-trained U.S. lawyer with the same degree (a JD) and credentials as other attorneys in the US.

LSAT not required for admission.
For more Information: http://choosearizonalaw.com/node/65
Or Contact JDAS@law.arizona.edu
Why pursue a LLM when you could earn a JD?

Arizona Law has recently reduced the tuition and fees for its 2-year accelerated JD to $26,000 per year. This program allows those with a non-U.S. law degrees to earn a JD in only two years - and for a total cost not much more (and in some cases less) than many students invest for an LLM. Those holding a non-U.S. law degree and a U.S. LLM, can earn a JD in only three semesters.

A JD offers many advantages to an LLM including:

• Access to the bar exam in all 50 states
• The same foundational training provided to U.S. students, ensuring a deeper understanding of American legal principles and processes, necessary for both the practice of law and bar passage.
• Significantly enhanced employment opportunities, as you will be a fully-trained U.S. lawyer with the same degree (a JD) and credentials as other attorneys in the US.

LSAT not required for admission.
For more Information: http://choosearizonalaw.com/node/65
Or Contact JDAS@law.arizona.edu
quote
Brainy Smu...
Definitely a growing trend in the US.

Accelerated (2 years) JD list:

Arizona
Arkansas
ASU (LSAT)
Coastal
Daytona
Kansas (LSAT)
Northwestern (LSAT)
Pepperdine (LSAT)
Regent (LSAT)
Southwestern
Stetson
SUNY (LSAT)
Vermont

Aforementioned. The accelerated JD is a nonstop 24 month programme designed for eager law students. US law schools propagate a demand for foreign-trained law students by setting an incentive aimed at international students. Therefore the incentive toward international students was executed by means of a decrease in JD applicants but an increase in LLM applicants. Since US LLM applicants have been at the demises of bureaucratic nonsense (glass-ceiling affect). US law schools are slowly opening the floodgates for eager international students who desire practicing in the US.

Kind regards.
Definitely a growing trend in the US.

Accelerated (2 years) JD list:

Arizona
Arkansas
ASU (LSAT)
Coastal
Daytona
Kansas (LSAT)
Northwestern (LSAT)
Pepperdine (LSAT)
Regent (LSAT)
Southwestern
Stetson
SUNY (LSAT)
Vermont

Aforementioned. The accelerated JD is a nonstop 24 month programme designed for eager law students. US law schools propagate a demand for foreign-trained law students by setting an incentive aimed at international students. Therefore the incentive toward international students was executed by means of a decrease in JD applicants but an increase in LLM applicants. Since US LLM applicants have been at the demises of bureaucratic nonsense (glass-ceiling affect). US law schools are slowly opening the floodgates for eager international students who desire practicing in the US.

Kind regards.
quote
Brent815
Actually, at Arizona, the accelerated 2 year JD for non-US lawyers, called the JD with Advanced Standing (JDAS) is not 24 months non-stop. It is two regular years (e.g. four semesters) of classes, with a summer break in between. The program is "accelerated" in the sense that those holding a non-US law degree are given one year's worth of transfer credit for their non-US degree. As a result, they are able to earn their JD degree in only two years instead of three, and save one year's worth of tuition. Tuition for Arizona's JD with Advanced Standing Program is also set at a flat $26,000 per year, which is significantly less that out-of-state tuition for the 3-year JD program - and also less costly in total (for two years) than many one-year LLM programs.
Actually, at Arizona, the accelerated 2 year JD for non-US lawyers, called the JD with Advanced Standing (JDAS) is not 24 months non-stop. It is two regular years (e.g. four semesters) of classes, with a summer break in between. The program is "accelerated" in the sense that those holding a non-US law degree are given one year's worth of transfer credit for their non-US degree. As a result, they are able to earn their JD degree in only two years instead of three, and save one year's worth of tuition. Tuition for Arizona's JD with Advanced Standing Program is also set at a flat $26,000 per year, which is significantly less that out-of-state tuition for the 3-year JD program - and also less costly in total (for two years) than many one-year LLM programs.
quote
sxh090
One small correction please: The Accelerated J.D. for Foreign-Trained Lawyers at the University of Arkansas does not require LSAT. Please visit our website for admission requirements. Many thanks.
http://law.uark.edu/academics/accelerated-jd/apply/
One small correction please: The Accelerated J.D. for Foreign-Trained Lawyers at the University of Arkansas does not require LSAT. Please visit our website for admission requirements. Many thanks.
http://law.uark.edu/academics/accelerated-jd/apply/


quote
Brainy Smu...
One small correction please: The Accelerated J.D. for Foreign-Trained Lawyers at the University of Arkansas does not require LSAT. Please visit our website for admission requirements. Many thanks.
http://law.uark.edu/academics/accelerated-jd/apply/


Here was the misunderstanding under "Applying to the Program":

"The admissions committee in some instances may request additional information, such as an LSAT score and a personal interview on Skype". (URL: http://law.uark.edu/academics/accelerated-jd/)

Kind regards.
<blockquote>One small correction please: The Accelerated J.D. for Foreign-Trained Lawyers at the University of Arkansas does not require LSAT. Please visit our website for admission requirements. Many thanks.
http://law.uark.edu/academics/accelerated-jd/apply/
</blockquote>

Here was the misunderstanding under "Applying to the Program":

"The admissions committee in some instances may request additional information, such as an LSAT score and a personal interview on Skype". (URL: http://law.uark.edu/academics/accelerated-jd/)

Kind regards.
quote
david75
Are u sure that the LSAT is not needed for Arizona State University?
Are u sure that the LSAT is not needed for Arizona State University?
quote
david75
Definitely a growing trend in the US.

Accelerated (2 years) JD list:

Arizona
Arkansas
ASU
Coastal
Daytona
Kansas (LSAT)
Northwestern (LSAT)
Pepperdine
Regent (LSAT)
Southwestern
Stetson
Vermont

Aforementioned. The accelerated JD is a nonstop 24 month programme designed for eager law students. US law schools propagate a demand for foreign-trained law students by setting an incentive aimed at international students. Therefore the incentive toward international students was executed by means of a decrease in JD applicants but an increase in LLM applicants. Since US LLM applicants have been at the demises of bureaucratic nonsense (glass-ceiling affect). US law schools are slowly opening the floodgates for eager international students who desire practicing in the US.

Kind regards.


are u sure that the LSAT is not required for Pepperdine and ASU ?
<blockquote>Definitely a growing trend in the US.

Accelerated (2 years) JD list:

Arizona
Arkansas
ASU
Coastal
Daytona
Kansas (LSAT)
Northwestern (LSAT)
Pepperdine
Regent (LSAT)
Southwestern
Stetson
Vermont

Aforementioned. The accelerated JD is a nonstop 24 month programme designed for eager law students. US law schools propagate a demand for foreign-trained law students by setting an incentive aimed at international students. Therefore the incentive toward international students was executed by means of a decrease in JD applicants but an increase in LLM applicants. Since US LLM applicants have been at the demises of bureaucratic nonsense (glass-ceiling affect). US law schools are slowly opening the floodgates for eager international students who desire practicing in the US.

Kind regards.</blockquote>

are u sure that the LSAT is not required for Pepperdine and ASU ?
quote
Brainy Smu...
Definitely a growing trend in the US.

Accelerated (2 years) JD list:

Arizona
Arkansas
ASU
Coastal
Daytona
Kansas (LSAT)
Northwestern (LSAT)
Pepperdine
Regent (LSAT)
Southwestern
Stetson
Vermont

Aforementioned. The accelerated JD is a nonstop 24 month programme designed for eager law students. US law schools propagate a demand for foreign-trained law students by setting an incentive aimed at international students. Therefore the incentive toward international students was executed by means of a decrease in JD applicants but an increase in LLM applicants. Since US LLM applicants have been at the demises of bureaucratic nonsense (glass-ceiling affect). US law schools are slowly opening the floodgates for eager international students who desire practicing in the US.

Kind regards.


are u sure that the LSAT is not required for Pepperdine and ASU ?



Good question. I looked through both websites and found nothing. Therefore, I was relying on others to give us feedback so I could revise it. The only option you have in answering your inquiry, would be to send an email to both law schools.
<blockquote><blockquote>Definitely a growing trend in the US.

Accelerated (2 years) JD list:

Arizona
Arkansas
ASU
Coastal
Daytona
Kansas (LSAT)
Northwestern (LSAT)
Pepperdine
Regent (LSAT)
Southwestern
Stetson
Vermont

Aforementioned. The accelerated JD is a nonstop 24 month programme designed for eager law students. US law schools propagate a demand for foreign-trained law students by setting an incentive aimed at international students. Therefore the incentive toward international students was executed by means of a decrease in JD applicants but an increase in LLM applicants. Since US LLM applicants have been at the demises of bureaucratic nonsense (glass-ceiling affect). US law schools are slowly opening the floodgates for eager international students who desire practicing in the US.

Kind regards.</blockquote>

are u sure that the LSAT is not required for Pepperdine and ASU ?</blockquote>


Good question. I looked through both websites and found nothing. Therefore, I was relying on others to give us feedback so I could revise it. The only option you have in answering your inquiry, would be to send an email to both law schools.
quote
david75
Ok thanks, I will call the admission services
I will let u know
Ok thanks, I will call the admission services
I will let u know
quote
david75
Ok, so the LSAT is required for ASU and Pepperdine
Ok, so the LSAT is required for ASU and Pepperdine
quote
Brainy Smu...
Ok, so the LSAT is required for ASU and Pepperdine


Thank you.
<blockquote>Ok, so the LSAT is required for ASU and Pepperdine</blockquote>

Thank you.
quote
ublawllm
SUNY Buffalo Law School in New York has also recently announced an Accelerated JD Program. We do require the LSAT. More information at:
http://www.law.buffalo.edu/academics/accelerated-jd.html
And feel free to contact me with questions.

Joseph E. Schneider
Director of Post-Professional and International Education
SUNY Buffalo Law School
704 O'Brian Hall
Buffalo, NY 14260
(716) 645-2527 (voice); 6676 (fax)
jes2@buffalo.edu
http://law.buffalo.edu
Skype: ublawllm
SUNY Buffalo Law School in New York has also recently announced an Accelerated JD Program. We do require the LSAT. More information at:
http://www.law.buffalo.edu/academics/accelerated-jd.html
And feel free to contact me with questions.

Joseph E. Schneider
Director of Post-Professional and International Education
SUNY Buffalo Law School
704 O'Brian Hall
Buffalo, NY 14260
(716) 645-2527 (voice); 6676 (fax)
jes2@buffalo.edu
http://law.buffalo.edu
Skype: ublawllm
quote
bluewin888
So, how many law schools do not require LSAT?

I am going to apply this year.....
So, how many law schools do not require LSAT?

I am going to apply this year.....
quote
Brainy Smu...
Accelerated (2 years) JD list:

Arizona
Arkansas
ASU (LSAT)
Coastal
Daytona
Kansas (LSAT)
Northwestern (LSAT)
Pepperdine (LSAT)
Regent (LSAT)
Southwestern
Stetson
SUNY (LSAT)
Vermont
Accelerated (2 years) JD list:

Arizona
Arkansas
ASU (LSAT)
Coastal
Daytona
Kansas (LSAT)
Northwestern (LSAT)
Pepperdine (LSAT)
Regent (LSAT)
Southwestern
Stetson
SUNY (LSAT)
Vermont
quote
KellyLLM
Hiii

I am Kelly from Brazil, I am unable to decide out of Accelrated JD or LLM?

Please guide me
Hiii

I am Kelly from Brazil, I am unable to decide out of Accelrated JD or LLM?

Please guide me
quote
olivers
Hiii

I am Kelly from Brazil, I am unable to decide out of Accelrated JD or LLM?

Please guide me


Hi Kelly. Since you are Brazilian I suggest an LL.M. Brazilians have a better chance at jobs after LL.M. An accelerated J.D. puts you into the same position as an LL.M., with a visa and sponsorship requirements. So most employers shy away from such candidates. Officially, they are not supposed to but then again, they can and easily do.

Unless you have a burning desire to do a JD and have some solid leads from your relationships back home. Consider your return on investment carefully before splurging on a A. JD or LL.M.

Good luck with whatever you decide.
<blockquote>Hiii

I am Kelly from Brazil, I am unable to decide out of Accelrated JD or LLM?

Please guide me</blockquote>

Hi Kelly. Since you are Brazilian I suggest an LL.M. Brazilians have a better chance at jobs after LL.M. An accelerated J.D. puts you into the same position as an LL.M., with a visa and sponsorship requirements. So most employers shy away from such candidates. Officially, they are not supposed to but then again, they can and easily do.

Unless you have a burning desire to do a JD and have some solid leads from your relationships back home. Consider your return on investment carefully before splurging on a A. JD or LL.M.

Good luck with whatever you decide.
quote
Can I make some observations?

I am a full time professor in the U.S., but I also teach part time in Korea. Most Korean students taking a U.S. law LL.M are interested in preparing to deal with U.S. regulatory compliance issues. Their companies send them to these programs to learn how to deal with U.S. government regulators. For that reason, most are looking at taking the Washington D.C. bar exam. Some are looking to take the California bar.

The goal, for them, is not to become general U.S. lawyers handling a broad swath of American law, but instead to guide the company in dealing with U.S. federal regulators. I don't think I am violating any confidences in saying that Kia, LG, Doosan, Hyundai, and Samsung are among the companies that believe that this education is valuable to their companies.

Nevertheless, in order to pass the D.C. bar, these students need to take a number of courses they are unlikely to ever use. Property and Constitutional Law are two examples. However, they also take many courses that are essential to their needs such as Administrative Law, Payment Systems, and Torts (products liability in particular).

So what would I recommend? It depends. My school offers a U.S. LLM program on line which prepares students to take the bar. We also offer an LLM program in Logistics and Transportation that deals primarily with three areas-regulatory compliance/administrative law; international business transactions (international sales, maritime, and aviation), and military logistics.

We are in the process of putting together a Masters Program in government contracting and acquisitions, but this will be targeted toward U.S. military contractors, and isn't expected on-line until January 2015.

So I don't know if that "guided" you one way or the other. But I hope it better informed you in any event.

Contact me directly if you have other questions. My email is rsullivan@fcsl.edu.
Can I make some observations?

I am a full time professor in the U.S., but I also teach part time in Korea. Most Korean students taking a U.S. law LL.M are interested in preparing to deal with U.S. regulatory compliance issues. Their companies send them to these programs to learn how to deal with U.S. government regulators. For that reason, most are looking at taking the Washington D.C. bar exam. Some are looking to take the California bar.

The goal, for them, is not to become general U.S. lawyers handling a broad swath of American law, but instead to guide the company in dealing with U.S. federal regulators. I don't think I am violating any confidences in saying that Kia, LG, Doosan, Hyundai, and Samsung are among the companies that believe that this education is valuable to their companies.

Nevertheless, in order to pass the D.C. bar, these students need to take a number of courses they are unlikely to ever use. Property and Constitutional Law are two examples. However, they also take many courses that are essential to their needs such as Administrative Law, Payment Systems, and Torts (products liability in particular).

So what would I recommend? It depends. My school offers a U.S. LLM program on line which prepares students to take the bar. We also offer an LLM program in Logistics and Transportation that deals primarily with three areas-regulatory compliance/administrative law; international business transactions (international sales, maritime, and aviation), and military logistics.

We are in the process of putting together a Masters Program in government contracting and acquisitions, but this will be targeted toward U.S. military contractors, and isn't expected on-line until January 2015.

So I don't know if that "guided" you one way or the other. But I hope it better informed you in any event.

Contact me directly if you have other questions. My email is rsullivan@fcsl.edu.
quote
Greetings !
Can I ask question ? I already have law degree out of US,and I exercised as a lawyer for more than 2 years,but now I am living in US after I got a permanent resident. I haven't decide yet whether to study LLM or JD . please who can recommend me to choose the right one ?

Thanks
Alind Zebari
Greetings !
Can I ask question ? I already have law degree out of US,and I exercised as a lawyer for more than 2 years,but now I am living in US after I got a permanent resident. I haven't decide yet whether to study LLM or JD . please who can recommend me to choose the right one ?

Thanks
Alind Zebari
quote
ublawllm
Hello Alind Zebari! I direct the LL.M. programs at SUNY Buffalo Law School. We also offer a two-year J.D. I am asked this question frequently, and this is how I answer it generally. If you want to talk about your specific goals and circumstances, feel free to message me and we can set up a time to talk.

If you want to practice law in the United States, the two-year J.D. will put you in a better position for several reasons. First, it will increase the likelihood that you will pass whatever bar exam (or exams) you take (and it will give you more flexibility in terms of where you want to practice). Second, the J.D. is a more competitive credential in the U.S. job market. And finally, it will give you more time to build a network and get more experience outside the classroom. We have a strong but selective LL.M. program, and it has given many students a solid foundation in many areas (notably criminal law, commercial law, and human rights), but if you have a non-U.S. first degree in law and want to practice in the U.S., the two-year J.D. will open more doors and better prepare you.

Joe Schneider
SUNY Buffalo Law School
The State University of New York
Hello Alind Zebari! I direct the LL.M. programs at SUNY Buffalo Law School. We also offer a two-year J.D. I am asked this question frequently, and this is how I answer it generally. If you want to talk about your specific goals and circumstances, feel free to message me and we can set up a time to talk.

If you want to practice law in the United States, the two-year J.D. will put you in a better position for several reasons. First, it will increase the likelihood that you will pass whatever bar exam (or exams) you take (and it will give you more flexibility in terms of where you want to practice). Second, the J.D. is a more competitive credential in the U.S. job market. And finally, it will give you more time to build a network and get more experience outside the classroom. We have a strong but selective LL.M. program, and it has given many students a solid foundation in many areas (notably criminal law, commercial law, and human rights), but if you have a non-U.S. first degree in law and want to practice in the U.S., the two-year J.D. will open more doors and better prepare you.

Joe Schneider
SUNY Buffalo Law School
The State University of New York
quote
Thank You very much Mr.Joe Schneider for your good explination was really helpful...
1 more question if you don't mind is there and differences between JD for 2 years and JD for 3 years,because as I know JD for US student takes 3 years ?

Thanks
Thank You very much Mr.Joe Schneider for your good explination was really helpful...
1 more question if you don't mind is there and differences between JD for 2 years and JD for 3 years,because as I know JD for US student takes 3 years ?

Thanks
quote

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