UK or USA?


Chrissie
I am planning to do an LLM next year -USA is probably too expensive, but UK is not as respected I believe. Or is the difference not so big? I want to work in an international law firm and I do not know if a UK LLM would be sufficient for them...
I am planning to do an LLM next year -USA is probably too expensive, but UK is not as respected I believe. Or is the difference not so big? I want to work in an international law firm and I do not know if a UK LLM would be sufficient for them...
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Russ
I personally prefer the UK LLM programs! But I'm not in charge of hiring people for big law firms, so that may not be relevant ;-)

To be serious, some programmess in the UK are highly regarded. There is a worldwide university ranking from 2004 which has many American universities in the top position, but also UK university such as Cambridge, Oxford and University College London (UCL). So I do not see any reason why British programmes should be disadvantageous to your career as a lawyer compared to American programmes. Surely not just because they are less costly.
I personally prefer the UK LLM programs! But I'm not in charge of hiring people for big law firms, so that may not be relevant ;-)

To be serious, some programmess in the UK are highly regarded. There is a worldwide university ranking from 2004 which has many American universities in the top position, but also UK university such as Cambridge, Oxford and University College London (UCL). So I do not see any reason why British programmes should be disadvantageous to your career as a lawyer compared to American programmes. Surely not just because they are less costly.
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Russ
By the way, many international law firms are British, e.g. Freshfields and Clifford Chance!
By the way, many international law firms are British, e.g. Freshfields and Clifford Chance!
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Nisreen
I also prefer LLM courses in the UK! I know a few other foreign students who did the LLM in London and got very good jobs after that. Some are working as "city lawyers" in law firms in London now.
I also prefer LLM courses in the UK! I know a few other foreign students who did the LLM in London and got very good jobs after that. Some are working as "city lawyers" in law firms in London now.
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Pieter
Hi all, unless you get a scholarship for one of the top tier schools in the US, i would rather choose cheaper England to do an LL.M. If you're intent on working in an international law firm, a good degree from one of the better schools in England will normally do the trick. Took my masters at Manchester and now work with Clifford Chance.
Hi all, unless you get a scholarship for one of the top tier schools in the US, i would rather choose cheaper England to do an LL.M. If you're intent on working in an international law firm, a good degree from one of the better schools in England will normally do the trick. Took my masters at Manchester and now work with Clifford Chance.
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Reinhard
Hi pieter-
which llm program did you study?
manchester is one ot the univerisities I applied for,
I guess you would recommand it?
thnx, reinhard
Hi pieter-
which llm program did you study?
manchester is one ot the univerisities I applied for,
I guess you would recommand it?
thnx, reinhard
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bavaria
I vote for UK ;-)
I vote for UK ;-)
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Pieter
Hi Reinhard,

yes I can recommend manchester. I got offers from Nottingham, Bristol and Essex but decided to go to Manchester for a couple of reasons:

1. They were 3rd in the rankings when i applied (2001). There are no longer but are consistenly ranked in the top 10 and I believe will improve this position now that the University has merged with with UMIST. They are extremely ambitious about making Manchester one of the top 25 universities in the world by 2015 and i am sure in the near future it will no longer be just Oxbridge and London that will be recognized as top tier universities in the UK.

2. If you are going to live in a place for a year, you want to have some fun after close of play. Manchester is a fantastic city (although people from London tend to disagree here haha) offering buzzing nightlife, clubs, bars, but also museums and opera. I left three 2,5 years ago, but have been back three time since.

3. Manchester has one of the biggest student populations in Europe (i believe about 70,000 student altogether), so you're bound to meet former mancs whereever you go, once you're finished.

4. If you like, I can give you contact details of people within the law school, so you can get in touch with them for more information, or in case you should want to visit the city before you make up your mind.

Which other schools did you apply to?

Cheers,

Pieter
Hi Reinhard,

yes I can recommend manchester. I got offers from Nottingham, Bristol and Essex but decided to go to Manchester for a couple of reasons:

1. They were 3rd in the rankings when i applied (2001). There are no longer but are consistenly ranked in the top 10 and I believe will improve this position now that the University has merged with with UMIST. They are extremely ambitious about making Manchester one of the top 25 universities in the world by 2015 and i am sure in the near future it will no longer be just Oxbridge and London that will be recognized as top tier universities in the UK.

2. If you are going to live in a place for a year, you want to have some fun after close of play. Manchester is a fantastic city (although people from London tend to disagree here haha) offering buzzing nightlife, clubs, bars, but also museums and opera. I left three 2,5 years ago, but have been back three time since.

3. Manchester has one of the biggest student populations in Europe (i believe about 70,000 student altogether), so you're bound to meet former mancs whereever you go, once you're finished.

4. If you like, I can give you contact details of people within the law school, so you can get in touch with them for more information, or in case you should want to visit the city before you make up your mind.

Which other schools did you apply to?

Cheers,

Pieter

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Reinhard
Hi Pieter,
Thanks for your reponse -
The decision where to go seems not getting easier...
My favourite is Durham, other universities (I think in this order): Nottingham, Manchester, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Bristol, Aberdeen, Leicester, Birmingam, Exeter.
Of course it's great to study in a bit city, but I already studied in Paris, so that's not so important for me any longer.
Well I'll wait and see which offers I receive, maybe that narrows the choice.

Cheers, Reinhard

PS Thanks for your offer to give me some contacts - It would indeed be great to know where to ask!
Hi Pieter,
Thanks for your reponse -
The decision where to go seems not getting easier...
My favourite is Durham, other universities (I think in this order): Nottingham, Manchester, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Bristol, Aberdeen, Leicester, Birmingam, Exeter.
Of course it's great to study in a bit city, but I already studied in Paris, so that's not so important for me any longer.
Well I'll wait and see which offers I receive, maybe that narrows the choice.

Cheers, Reinhard

PS Thanks for your offer to give me some contacts - It would indeed be great to know where to ask!
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Bunmi
:-( some1 like me dont have a chance....well i wont give up but i went to the university of hertfordshire to do my law my college tutor told me she felt i would not get into Westminster Uni which i now know i could have (but o well) it is better uni than the one i am at present. 1 thing that is putting me off practising here is that most of the firms are lookng for ppl whi went to oxford cambridge etc and ppl who has A's and B's at A'level....but i guess thats how it is all over the world...am i in the wrong field????
:-( some1 like me dont have a chance....well i wont give up but i went to the university of hertfordshire to do my law my college tutor told me she felt i would not get into Westminster Uni which i now know i could have (but o well) it is better uni than the one i am at present. 1 thing that is putting me off practising here is that most of the firms are lookng for ppl whi went to oxford cambridge etc and ppl who has A's and B's at A'level....but i guess thats how it is all over the world...am i in the wrong field????
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Bunmi
i have been predicted a 2:2 but so far this year have been working at level of 2:1 and plan to keep it that way...i always messed up in the exams always left it bit late but have decided i will start 2months b4.....im not looking to work with the BIGEST names cos i know they will just throw my application in the bin but do i have a chance?
i have been predicted a 2:2 but so far this year have been working at level of 2:1 and plan to keep it that way...i always messed up in the exams always left it bit late but have decided i will start 2months b4.....im not looking to work with the BIGEST names cos i know they will just throw my application in the bin but do i have a chance?
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Pieter
Reinhard, just sent you a personal message with details of the contact person at Manchester law school, but it returned some unknown error. Should you not have received, let me know i will try again.
Reinhard, just sent you a personal message with details of the contact person at Manchester law school, but it returned some unknown error. Should you not have received, let me know i will try again.
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Reinhard
Hi Pieter,
I hope you received my answer of your Personal Message, which I received, thank you very much.
Everything was fine!
Hi Pieter,
I hope you received my answer of your Personal Message, which I received, thank you very much.
Everything was fine!
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slater
Wondering if you had a general sense of what the deadlines for applications are in the UK, US or even Austrailia?

Thanks so much.
Wondering if you had a general sense of what the deadlines for applications are in the UK, US or even Austrailia?

Thanks so much.

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jesslyna
If you want to practice in America, an LLM from an American Bar Association approved school is mandatory. In America, a law degree is a graduate degree and without a J.D., you cannot practice, unless you have an ABA approved LLM. If you have no desire to practice in the U.S., then get an LLM in the Uk. It's cheaper, quicker, and if you go to a good internationally recognized school, you will fare just as well, if not better than at a U.S. school. Best of luck!
If you want to practice in America, an LLM from an American Bar Association approved school is mandatory. In America, a law degree is a graduate degree and without a J.D., you cannot practice, unless you have an ABA approved LLM. If you have no desire to practice in the U.S., then get an LLM in the Uk. It's cheaper, quicker, and if you go to a good internationally recognized school, you will fare just as well, if not better than at a U.S. school. Best of luck!
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Nikolas
Deadlines in the US for international students are usually in December or in January , see for instance NYU:

When to Apply

For Fall Term Matriculation
LL.M. and J.S.D. Applicants with Foreign Education Credentials
Deadline - January 1*

*If you wish to be considered for any of our scholarship programs (including the Hauser Scholarship) or the Advanced Professional Certificate in Law and Business Summer Program, the deadline is December 1.

Applicants with foreign education credentials are required to begin their studies in the Fall term.

LL.M. and J.S.D. Applicants for Full-time Who Are Graduates of U.S. Law Schools
Deadline - April 1

Applicants for Part-time Study Who Are Graduates of U.S. Law Schools
Deadline - July 1

Spring Term Matriculation (Part-time Only)
Graduates of U.S. Law Schools Only
Deadline - December 1
Deadlines in the US for international students are usually in December or in January , see for instance NYU:

When to Apply

For Fall Term Matriculation
LL.M. and J.S.D. Applicants with Foreign Education Credentials
Deadline - January 1*

*If you wish to be considered for any of our scholarship programs (including the Hauser Scholarship) or the Advanced Professional Certificate in Law and Business Summer Program, the deadline is December 1.

Applicants with foreign education credentials are required to begin their studies in the Fall term.

LL.M. and J.S.D. Applicants for Full-time Who Are Graduates of U.S. Law Schools
Deadline - April 1

Applicants for Part-time Study Who Are Graduates of U.S. Law Schools
Deadline - July 1

Spring Term Matriculation (Part-time Only)
Graduates of U.S. Law Schools Only
Deadline - December 1
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Nikolas
If you want to practice in America, an LLM from an American Bar Association approved school is mandatory. In America, a law degree is a graduate degree and without a J.D., you cannot practice, unless you have an ABA approved LLM.


In order to practice in the US you not only need an LLM from an American Bar Association approved law school, but you also have to take the bar exam. In many states an LLM will not qualify you to take the bar. The law schools will give you information about whether you will be eligible to take the bar exam. Make sure to find out about the bar rules before you apply! Even if you do not plan to practice in the US, to come back to your home country as an "Attorney at Law (New York)" may be a big plus for your career in an international law firm.
<blockquote>If you want to practice in America, an LLM from an American Bar Association approved school is mandatory. In America, a law degree is a graduate degree and without a J.D., you cannot practice, unless you have an ABA approved LLM.</blockquote>

In order to practice in the US you not only need an LLM from an American Bar Association approved law school, but you also have to take the bar exam. In many states an LLM will not qualify you to take the bar. The law schools will give you information about whether you will be eligible to take the bar exam. Make sure to find out about the bar rules before you apply! Even if you do not plan to practice in the US, to come back to your home country as an "Attorney at Law (New York)" may be a big plus for your career in an international law firm.
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Lawyer
Hi all!

I a final year LL.B student from India.I am aiming to work in an intenational law firm.I am told its tuff to find work contracts with UK law firms for foreign LL.M students.Pls advice on possible funding options both at US and UK Law schools for an LL.M and whether iot is lucrative to pursue an LL.M from the Uk?
Hi all!

I a final year LL.B student from India.I am aiming to work in an intenational law firm.I am told its tuff to find work contracts with UK law firms for foreign LL.M students.Pls advice on possible funding options both at US and UK Law schools for an LL.M and whether iot is lucrative to pursue an LL.M from the Uk?
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joi029
So many of these posts are incorrect. To be eligible for the NY bar you only need a three year LLB from a common law jurisdiction. To practice in other states you will need an ABA approved LLM, however, NY is the most desirable and 95% of foreign LLB's end up doing the NY bar and passing (after a couple of takes). Once again, there is no requirement for a US LLM in NY state. Also, LSE seems to be the most "well-known" foreign university amongst US law firms. Of course Oxbridge is the oldest and most respected, but LSE is more cutting edge and progressive - attributes US firms look for.
So many of these posts are incorrect. To be eligible for the NY bar you only need a three year LLB from a common law jurisdiction. To practice in other states you will need an ABA approved LLM, however, NY is the most desirable and 95% of foreign LLB's end up doing the NY bar and passing (after a couple of takes). Once again, there is no requirement for a US LLM in NY state. Also, LSE seems to be the most "well-known" foreign university amongst US law firms. Of course Oxbridge is the oldest and most respected, but LSE is more cutting edge and progressive - attributes US firms look for.
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Nikolas
Once again, there is no requirement for a US LLM in NY state.


I just wanted to point out that an LLM as such does not entitle you to practice law in the US.

Here are the New York rules for the admission of attorneys and counselors at law (§ 520.6 is about foreign law degrees):

Source: http://www.nycourts.gov/ctapps/

§ 520.1 General

(a) A person shall be admitted to practice law in the courts of the State of New York only by an order of the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court upon compliance with these rules.

(b) Saving Clause. Those provisions of the rules of the Court of Appeals for the admission of attorneys and counselors at law that prescribe the qualifications for admission to the New York State bar examination, which were in effect at the time an applicant for admission commenced the study of law, to the extent that the application thereof was or would have been less restrictive or burdensome, shall determine the applicant's eligibility for admission to such examination.

§ 520.2 Admission Upon Examination

(a) Proof Required by the New York State Board of Law Examiners. An applicant for admission to the New York State bar examination shall furnish to the New York State Board of Law Examiners, in accordance with its rules, proof satisfactory to said board:

(1) that applicant is over 21 years of age;

(2) as to the date and place of birth; and

(3) that applicant has complied with section 520.3, 520.4, 520.5 or 520.6 of this Part.

§ 520.3 Study of Law in Law School

(a) (1) General. Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (2) of this subdivision, an applicant may qualify to take the New York State bar examination by submitting to the New York State Board of Law Examiners satisfactory proof that applicant attended and was graduated with a first degree in law from a law school or law schools which at all times during the period of applicant's attendance was or were approved.

(2) An applicant may qualify to take the New York State bar examination by submitting to the New York State Board of Law Examiners satisfactory proof that applicant attended and successfully completed the prescribed course of instruction required for a first degree in law, but the State Board of Law Examiners shall not certify the applicant for admission to the bar pursuant to section 520.7(a) of this Part until the applicant has presented a certificate showing that the applicant has been awarded a first degree in law.

(b) Approved Law School Defined. An approved law school for purposes of these rules is one:

(1) whose program and course of study meet the requirements of this section, as shown by the law school's bulletin or catalogue, which shall be filed annually with the Clerk of the Court of Appeals; and

(2) which is approved by the American Bar Association.

(c) Instructional Requirement.

(1) An approved law school shall require for its first degree in law the successful completion of either a full-time or a part-time program which consists of:

(i) a minimum of 80 semester hours of credit, including at least 60 semester hours in professional law subjects. A maximum of 20 of the required 80 semester hours may be courses related to legal training or clinical courses as provided in sections (2) and (5) of this subdivision; and

(ii) at least 1,120 hours of classroom study, exclusive of examination time.

(2) Other courses related to legal training taught by members of the faculty of said law school or university, or taught by members of the faculty of any university or college with which the law school offers a joint degree program, may, in the discretion of the law school, be substituted for professional law subjects to the extent of no more than 10 of the required 80 semester hours.

(3) No credit shall be allowed for correspondence courses.

(4) All study shall be evaluated by authentic written examination, except where such examination is inappropriate, such as in seminar and practice court courses or courses which are principally concerned with legal writing and research.

(5) Clinical and like courses may, in the discretion of the law school, be substituted for classroom periods to the extent of no more than 20 of the required 80 semester hours, where:

(i) a description of the course has been filed with the Clerk of the Court of Appeals, either separately or in the law school's annual catalogue or bulletin;

(ii) the course is under the direct and immediate supervision of a member or members of the faculty;

(iii) the course includes adequate classroom meetings or seminars during the same semester in which the clinical work is completed in order to insure contemporaneous discussion, review and evaluation of the clinical experience; and

(iv) the law school certificate of attendance filed with the New York State Board of Law Examiners lists separately the credit allowed for clinical courses or other nonclassroom study.

(d) Full-Time Program Defined. A full-time program shall consist of at least 75 and no more than 105 calendar weeks in residence, including reading periods not to exceed one week per semester and examinations, of at least 10 classroom periods per week, scheduled principally between the hours of 8 a.m. and 6 p.m., totaling not less than the equivalent of 1,120 hours of classroom study, exclusive of examination time. A calendar week shall include four days of scheduled classes; however, no more than three three-day weeks per semester may be counted toward the 75-week minimum. A semester which includes successful completion of at least 10 credit hours per week of study shall be counted as 15 full-time weeks in residence toward the residency weeks requirement of this subdivision. As allowed under subdivision (h) of this section, a summer session which includes successful completion of at least 5 credit hours per week of study shall be counted as 7.5 full-time calendar weeks in residence toward the residency weeks requirement of this subdivision.

(e) Part-Time Program Defined. A part-time program shall consist of at least 105 and no more than 135 calendar weeks in residence, including reading periods not to exceed one week per semester and examinations, of at least eight classroom periods per week, irrespective of the hours at which the classroom periods are scheduled, totaling not less than the equivalent of 1,120 hours of classroom study, exclusive of examination time. A calendar week shall include three days of scheduled classes; however, no more than three two-day weeks per semester may be counted toward the 105-week minimum. A semester which includes successful completion of at least 8 credit hours per week of study shall be counted as 15 part-time weeks in residence toward the residency weeks requirement of this subdivision. As allowed under subdivision (h) of this section, a summer session which includes successful completion of at least 4 credit hours per week of study shall be counted as 7.5 part-time calendar weeks in residence toward the residency weeks requirement of this subdivision.

(f) Successful Completion Defined. Complete credit for an academic year, semester, quarter or summer session in an approved law school in which one or more courses have been failed shall not be given until the passing grades in the courses failed have been earned, or substitute courses successfully completed, or unless the failures are compensated for by a sufficiently high average for the same academic year, semester, quarter or summer session under acceptable regulations established by the law school in which the applicant is matriculated.

(g) Transfer from One Law School Program to Another. A student may transfer from a full-time to a part-time program, or from a part-time to a full-time program, at the end of any semester, quarter or other complete academic session. In computing residence credit:

(1) each week of a full-time program shall be deemed equal to one and one-third weeks of a part-time program; and

(2) each week of a part-time program shall be deemed equal to three-fourths of a week of a full-time program.

(h) Summer Session. Credit may be given for successful completion of courses taken in summer session only if such session is approved by the dean of the law school in which the applicant is matriculated.

(i) Credit for Law Study in Foreign Country. An approved law school may, in its discretion, allow such credit as it may determine toward the total credits required for a first degree in law to an applicant who studied law in a law school in a foreign country.

§ 520.4 Study of Law in Law Office

(a) General. An applicant may qualify to take the New York State bar examination by submitting to the New York State Board of Law Examiners satisfactory proof:

(1) that applicant commenced the study of law after applicant's 18th birthday; and

(2) that applicant successfully completed at least one academic year as a matriculated student in a full-time program or the equivalent in a part-time program at an approved law school and at the conclusion thereof was eligible to continue in that school's degree program; and

(3) that the applicant thereafter studied law in a law office or offices located within New York State under the supervision of one or more attorneys admitted to practice law in New York State, for such a period of time as, together with the credit allowed pursuant to this section for attendance in an approved law school, shall aggregate four years.

(b) Employment and Instruction Requirements. An applicant studying law in a law office or offices within New York State must be actually and continuously employed during the required period as a regular law clerk and student in a law office, under the direction and subject to the supervision of one or more attorneys admitted to practice law in New York State, and must be actually engaged in the practical work of such law office during normal business hours. In addition, the applicant must receive instruction from said attorney or attorneys in those subjects which are customarily taught in approved law schools.

(c) Credit for Attendance in Approved Law School. Credit shall be allowed for attendance in an approved law school as follows:

(1) credit of one full year or 52 weeks shall be allowed for any successfully completed year of a full-time law school program;

(2) credit of three quarters of a year or 39 weeks shall be allowed for any successfully completed year of a part-time law school program;

(3) proportionate credit shall be allowed for any successfully completed semester, quarter or summer session in such a full-time or part-time law school program;

(4) for any period of law school study not successfully completed, credit may be allowed for attendance as determined by the New York State Board of Law Examiners based on an evaluation of performance in the individual case.

(d) Vacations. Vacations taken by the applicant in excess of one month in any year of study shall be deducted from the period of law office study for which credit shall be given, but failure by the applicant to take a vacation shall not decrease the period of study required by this section.

(e) Certificate of Commencement of Law Office Study. It shall be the duty of the attorney or attorneys with whom a period of law office study is about to be commenced to obtain from, complete and file with, the Clerk of the Court of Appeals a certificate of commencement of clerkship, Appendix B-2, infra. At the time the certificate of commencement of clerkship is filed, the applicant shall provide the Court of Appeals with a copy of the determination of the New York State Board of Law Examiners of the credit to which the applicant is entitled under subdivision (c) of this section.

(f) Credit for Law Study in Law Office. Credit shall be given only for study in a law office or offices completed subsequent to the filing of the certificate required by subdivision (e) of this section.

(g) Proof Required. Compliance with the requirements of this section shall be proved to the satisfaction of the New York State Board of Law Examiners.

§ 520.5 Study of Law in Law School and Actual Practice

(a) General. An applicant who has studied law in any law school in any other state or territory of the United States or in the District of Columbia, other than a law school which grants credit for correspondence courses, and has received a degree from such law school which qualifies such applicant to practice law in such state, territory or in the District of Columbia, may qualify to take the New York State bar examination by submitting to the New York State Board of Law Examiners satisfactory proof:

(1) that applicant possesses the legal education required by this section;

(2) that applicant's course of study complies with the instructional and program requirements of section 520.3(c) through (i) of this Part; and

(3) that while admitted to the bar in the highest court in any state or territory of the United States or in the District of Columbia, applicant has actually practiced therein for at least five years of the seven years immediately preceding the application to sit for the bar examination.

(b) Proof Required. The applicant shall submit to the New York State Board of Law Examiners such proof of compliance with the provisions of this section as the board may require.

§ 520.6 Study of Law in Foreign Country; Required Legal Education

(a) General. An applicant who has studied in a foreign country may qualify to take the New York State bar examination by submitting to the New York State Board of Law Examiners satisfactory proof of the legal education required by this section.

(b) Legal Education.

(1) The applicant shall show fulfillment of the educational requirements for admission to the practice of law in a country other than the United States by successful completion of a period of law study at least substantially equivalent in duration to that required, under subdivisions (d) and (e) of section 520.3 of this Part, in a law school or schools each of which, throughout the period of applicant's study therein, was recognized by the competent accrediting agency of the government of such other country, or of a political subdivision thereof, as qualified and approved; and

(i) that such other country is one whose jurisprudence is based upon the principles of the English Common Law, and that the program and course of law study successfully completed by the applicant were the substantial equivalent of the legal education provided by an approved law school in the United States; or

(ii) if applicant does not meet the durational equivalency requirements of subdivision (b)(1) of this section but has at least two years of substantively equivalent education, or if the applicant does not meet the substantive equivalency requirements of subdivision (b)(1) (i) of this section, that applicant has successfully completed a full-time or part-time program consisting of a minimum of 20 semester hours of credit, or the equivalent, in professional law subjects, which includes basic courses in American law, in an approved law school in the United States; or

(2) The applicant shall show admission to practice law in a country other than the United States whose jurisprudence is based upon principles of English Common Law, where admission was based upon a program of study in a law school and/or law office recognized by the competent accrediting agency of the government of such other country and which is durationally equivalent yet substantively deficient under subdivision (b)(1)(i) of this section, and that such applicant has successfully completed a full-time or part-time program consisting of a minimum of 20 semester hours of credit, or the equivalent, in professional law subjects, which includes basic courses in American law, in an approved law school in the United States.

(c) Proof Required. The applicant shall submit to the New York State Board of Law Examiners such proof of compliance with the provisions of this section as the board may require.

§ 520.7 Certification by Board of Law Examiners

(a) Except as provided in section 520.10 of this Part, no applicant for admission to practice in this State shall be admitted unless the New York State Board of Law Examiners shall have certified to the Appellate Division of the department in which, as shown by the papers filed by the applicant with the board, the applicant resides, or if not a resident of the State, in which such papers show that applicant is employed full-time, or, if the applicant does not reside and is not employed full-time in the State, to the Appellate Division of the Third Department, that the applicant (1) has passed the written bar examination prescribed in section 520.8 of this Part, and (2) has also passed the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination described in section 520.9 of this Part.

(b) The requirement of this Part shall first be applicable to those candidates for admission to practice law in New York who qualify for and take the July 1982 regular New York State bar examination and to all those who thereafter qualify for and take such examinations.

§ 520.8 New York State Bar Examination

(a) General. The New York State Board of Law Examiners shall twice each year conduct a written bar examination consisting of legal problems in both adjective and substantive law, and it shall by rule prescribe a list of subjects which will indicate the general scope of the bar examination. The board may use the Multistate Bar Examination as part of the bar examination.

(b) Uniformity of Bar Examinations. The bar examinations shall be as nearly uniform from year to year as is reasonably practicable.

(c) Preservation of Papers. Bar examination papers shall be preserved for a period of four months from the date of the announcement of the results of the bar examination, and may thereafter be destroyed.

(d) Examination Fee. Every applicant for a bar examination shall pay to the New York State Board of Law Examiners the fee prescribed by section 465 of the Judiciary Law.

§ 520.9 Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination

(a) General. The Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination referred to in section 520.7 of this Part shall be the examination bearing that name which is administered by the National Conference of Bar Examiners.

(b) Requirements and Times and Places for Taking Examination. An applicant may take the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination prior or subsequent to completion of the requirements for taking the New York State bar examination. An application to take the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination shall be filed with the National Conference of Bar Examiners and the fee therefor shall be fixed by and paid to that conference, which shall also fix the times and places, within or without the State of New York, for taking the examination.

(c) Passing Score. The New York State Board of Law Examiners may accept the scores attained by individual applicants on the examination as determined and reported to it by the National Conference of Bar Examiners, but such board shall determine the passing score for applicants seeking admission to practice in this State.

(d) Reexamination. There shall be no restriction on the right of a failing applicant to retake the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination.

§ 520.10 Admission Without Examination

(a) General. In its discretion, the Appellate Division may admit to practice without examination an applicant who:

(1) (i) has been admitted to practice in the highest law court in any other state or territory of the United States or in the District of Columbia; or

(ii) has been admitted to practice as an attorney and counselor-at-law or the equivalent in the highest court in another country whose jurisprudence is based upon the principles of the English Common Law; and

(iii) is currently admitted to the bar in such other jurisdiction or jurisdictions, that at least one such jurisdiction in which the attorney is so admitted would similarly admit an attorney or counselor-at-law admitted to practice in New York State to its bar without examination; and

(2) (i) while admitted to practice as specified in paragraph (1) of this subdivision, has actually practiced therein, for at least five of the seven years immediately preceding the application:

(a) in its highest law court or highest court of original jurisdiction in the state or territory of the United States, in the District of Columbia or in the common law country where admitted; or

(b) in Federal military or civilian legal service in a position which requires admission to the bar for the appointment thereto or for the performance of the duties thereof, even if the government service, civilian or military, was not in a jurisdiction in which the applicant was admitted to practice; or

(c) in legal services as counsel or assistant counsel to a corporation in the state or territory of the United States where admitted, or in the District of Columbia if admitted therein; or in the common law country where admitted; or

(ii) has been employed in any other state or territory of the United States or in the District of Columbia as a judge, magistrate, referee or similar official for the local, state or federal government in a tribunal of record, or as a law clerk to such judicial official, provided that such employment requires admission to the bar for the appointment thereto or for the performance of the duties thereof, for at least five of the seven years immediately preceding the application; or

(iii) has been employed in this State or in any other state or territory of the United States or in the District of Columbia as a full-time member of the law faculty teaching in a law school or schools on the approved list of the American Bar Association and has attained the rank of professor or associate professor for at least five of the seven years immediately preceding the application; or

(iv) has actually practiced as provided in subparagraph (i) of this paragraph, or been employed as a judicial official as provided in subparagraph (ii) of this paragraph, or has been teaching at a law school as provided in subparagraph (iii) of this paragraph, or has actually practiced while admitted pursuant to Rule 520.11(a)(2) of this Part, for a period of up to 18 months, in a combination or cumulation of service among the categories of practice, judicial or legal service or teaching where the Appellate Division determines that such five years of combined or cumulative service is the equivalent of the practice required in clause (a) of subparagraph (i); and

(3) has received a first degree from an approved law school in the United States at the time of applicant's admission to practice in such other state, territory, district or common law country, or at the time of application for admission under this section; and

(4) is over 26 years of age.

(b) Proof Required. An applicant for admission under this section shall file with the Clerk of the Appellate Division of the department in which, as shown by the papers filed by the applicant with the department, the applicant resides or, if not a resident of the state in which such papers show that the applicant is employed full-time or, if such papers do not show that the applicant resides or is employed full-time in the State, the Appellate Division of the Third Department:

(1) a certificate from the clerk of the highest court of the state, territory, district or foreign country in which applicant has been admitted to practice as an attorney and counselor-at-law or the equivalent, certifying to applicant's admission to practice and the date thereof; and

(2) in the case of an applicant seeking admission relying upon teaching, a certificate from the dean of the law school which employs or employed the applicant, certifying to the nature and extent of applicant's employment and the rank attained; and

(3) a certificate from the New York State Board of Law Examiners certifying that the applicant has received a first degree in law from an approved law school as defined in section 520.3(b) of this Part; and

(4) any such other satisfactory evidence of character and qualifications as the Appellate Division may require, which may include a report of the National Conference of Bar Examiners.

(c) Proof to be Submitted and Fee to be Paid to New York State Board of Law Examiners. The applicant shall submit to the New York State Board of Law Examiners such proof of compliance with the provisions of paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) of this section as the board may require and shall at the same time pay the board the fee prescribed by section 465 of the Judiciary Law by certified check or money order payable to the order of the board.

(d) Discretion of Appellate Division. The Appellate Division may in its discretion impose as a condition to admission such other tests of character and fitness as it may deem proper.

§ 520.11 Admission Pro Hac Vice

(a) General. An attorney and counselor-at-law or the equivalent, who is a member in good standing of the bar of another state, territory, district or foreign country may be admitted pro hac vice:

(1) in the discretion of any court of record, to participate in any matter in which the attorney is employed;

(2) in the discretion of the Appellate Division, provided applicant is a graduate of an approved law school, to advise and represent clients and participate in any matter during the continuance of the applicant's employment or association with an organization described in subdivision 7 of section 495 of the Judiciary Law or during employment with a District Attorney, Corporation Counsel or the Attorney General, but in no event for longer than 18 months.

(b) New York Law Students. A graduate student or graduate assistant at an approved law school in New York State may be admitted pro hac vice in the discretion of the Appellate Division, to advise and represent clients or participate in any matter during the continuance of applicant's enrollment in an approved law school in New York State as a graduate student or graduate assistant, or during applicant's employment as a law school teacher in an approved law school in New York State, if applicant is in good standing as an attorney and counselor-at-law or the equivalent of the bar of another state, territory, district or foreign country and is engaged to advise or represent the client through participation in an organization described in subdivision 7 of section 495 of the Judiciary Law or during employment with a District Attorney, Corporation Counsel or the Attorney General, but in no event for longer than 18 months.

(c) Association of New York Counsel. No attorney may be admitted pro hac vice pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) to participate in pre-trial or trial proceedings unless he or she is associated with an attorney who is a member in good standing of the New York bar, who shall be the attorney of record in the matter.

(d) Professional Responsibility Requirements. An attorney admitted pro hac vice pursuant to this section:

(1) shall be familiar with and shall comply with the standards of professional conduct imposed upon members of the New York bar, including the rules of court governing the conduct of attorneys and the Disciplinary Rules of the Code of Professional Responsibility; and

(2) shall be subject to the jurisdiction of the courts of this State with respect to any acts occurring during the course of the attorney's participation in the matter.

§ 520.12 Proof of Moral Character

(a) General. Every applicant for admission to practice must file with a committee on character and fitness appointed by the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court affidavits of reputable persons that applicant possesses the good moral character and general fitness requisite for an attorney and counselor-at-law as required by section 90 of the Judiciary Law. The number of such affidavits and the qualifications of persons acceptable as affiants shall be determined by the Appellate Division to which the applicant has been certified.

(b) Affidavits. The affidavits filed shall state that the applicant is, to the knowledge of the affiant, a person of good moral character and possesses the general fitness requisite for an attorney and counselor-at-law and shall set forth in detail the facts upon which such knowledge is based. Such affidavits shall not be conclusive proof as to character and fitness, and the Appellate Division to which the applicant has been certified may inquire further through its committee on character and fitness or otherwise.

(c) Discretion of Appellate Division. The Appellate Division in each department may adopt for its department such additional procedures for ascertaining the moral character and general fitness of applicants as it may deem proper, which may include submission of a report of the National Conference of Bar Examiners.

(d) Time to File Affidavits.

(1) Except as provided in paragraph (2) of this subdivision, every applicant for admission to practice, other than applicants for admission without examination pursuant to section 520.10 of this Part, shall file the affidavits required under subdivision (a) and any additional material required under subdivision (c) of this section within three years from the date of the letter sent by the New York State Board of Law Examiners notifying the applicant that the applicant has passed the bar examination prescribed in section 520.8 of this Part. The requirements of this subdivision shall first be applicable to those applicants for admission who pass the July 1994 bar examination.

(2) Any applicant for admission to practice who has passed the bar examination prescribed in section 520.8 of this Part, administered prior to July 1994, and who has not filed the affidavits required under subdivision (a) and additional material required under subdivision (c) of this section, must file such affidavits within three years from the date of the letter sent by the New York State Board of Law Examiners notifying the applicant that the applicant has passed the bar examination, or by November 9, 1995, whichever date is later.

§ 520.13 Designation of Agent for Service of Process

(a) Every applicant for admission to practice who does not reside and is not employed full-time in the State shall be required, as a condition of admission, to execute and file, with the Appellate Division of the department in which the applicant is being admitted, a duly acknowledged instrument in writing setting forth the applicant's residence or mailing address and designating the clerk of such Appellate Division as the applicant's agent upon whom process may be served, with like effect as if served personally upon the applicant, in any action or proceeding thereafter brought against the applicant and arising out of or based upon any legal services rendered or offered to be rendered by the applicant within the State.

(b) Any such applicant may, at any time after being admitted to practice, revoke a designation filed with the Appellate Division pursuant to subdivision (a) of this section by executing and filing with such Appellate Division an affidavit revoking such designation and showing that, as of the date of such affidavit, the applicant resides or is employed full-time in the State or has an office therein for the practice of law; except such revocation shall be effective only with respect to causes of action accruing after the filing thereof.

(c) Service of process on the clerk of the Appellate Division, pursuant to a designation filed pursuant to subdivision (a) of this section, shall be made by personally delivering to and leaving with such clerk, or with a deputy or assistant authorized to receive such service at the clerk's office, duplicate copies of the process together with a fee of $25. Service of process shall be complete when such clerk has been so served. Such clerk shall promptly send one copy of the process to the person to whom it is directed, by certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to such person at the address specified in the designation or at such other address as such person shall have specified in a duly acknowledged supplemental instrument in writing which such person shall have filed in the office of such clerk.

§ 520.14 Application for Waiver of Rules

The Court of Appeals, upon application, may in its discretion vary the application of or waive any provision of these rules where strict compliance will cause undue hardship to the applicant. Such application shall be in the form of a verified petition setting forth the applicant's name, age and residence address, the facts relied upon and a prayer for relief.

§ 520.15 Rules of the New York State Board of Law Examiners

The New York State Board of Law Examiners may from time to time adopt, amend or rescind rules, not inconsistent with these Rules, as it shall deem necessary and proper to enable it to discharge its duties as such duties are established by Law and by these rules. The rules so established by the Board shall not be adopted, amended or rescinded except by a majority vote of the members thereof.

A copy of each rule, adopted, amended or rescinded must, within 30 days of such action, be filed in the office of the Secretary of State.
<blockquote>Once again, there is no requirement for a US LLM in NY state.</blockquote>

I just wanted to point out that an LLM as such does not entitle you to practice law in the US.

Here are the New York rules for the admission of attorneys and counselors at law (§ 520.6 is about foreign law degrees):

Source: http://www.nycourts.gov/ctapps/

§ 520.1 General

(a) A person shall be admitted to practice law in the courts of the State of New York only by an order of the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court upon compliance with these rules.

(b) Saving Clause. Those provisions of the rules of the Court of Appeals for the admission of attorneys and counselors at law that prescribe the qualifications for admission to the New York State bar examination, which were in effect at the time an applicant for admission commenced the study of law, to the extent that the application thereof was or would have been less restrictive or burdensome, shall determine the applicant's eligibility for admission to such examination.

§ 520.2 Admission Upon Examination

(a) Proof Required by the New York State Board of Law Examiners. An applicant for admission to the New York State bar examination shall furnish to the New York State Board of Law Examiners, in accordance with its rules, proof satisfactory to said board:

(1) that applicant is over 21 years of age;

(2) as to the date and place of birth; and

(3) that applicant has complied with section 520.3, 520.4, 520.5 or 520.6 of this Part.

§ 520.3 Study of Law in Law School

(a) (1) General. Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (2) of this subdivision, an applicant may qualify to take the New York State bar examination by submitting to the New York State Board of Law Examiners satisfactory proof that applicant attended and was graduated with a first degree in law from a law school or law schools which at all times during the period of applicant's attendance was or were approved.

(2) An applicant may qualify to take the New York State bar examination by submitting to the New York State Board of Law Examiners satisfactory proof that applicant attended and successfully completed the prescribed course of instruction required for a first degree in law, but the State Board of Law Examiners shall not certify the applicant for admission to the bar pursuant to section 520.7(a) of this Part until the applicant has presented a certificate showing that the applicant has been awarded a first degree in law.

(b) Approved Law School Defined. An approved law school for purposes of these rules is one:

(1) whose program and course of study meet the requirements of this section, as shown by the law school's bulletin or catalogue, which shall be filed annually with the Clerk of the Court of Appeals; and

(2) which is approved by the American Bar Association.

(c) Instructional Requirement.

(1) An approved law school shall require for its first degree in law the successful completion of either a full-time or a part-time program which consists of:

(i) a minimum of 80 semester hours of credit, including at least 60 semester hours in professional law subjects. A maximum of 20 of the required 80 semester hours may be courses related to legal training or clinical courses as provided in sections (2) and (5) of this subdivision; and

(ii) at least 1,120 hours of classroom study, exclusive of examination time.

(2) Other courses related to legal training taught by members of the faculty of said law school or university, or taught by members of the faculty of any university or college with which the law school offers a joint degree program, may, in the discretion of the law school, be substituted for professional law subjects to the extent of no more than 10 of the required 80 semester hours.

(3) No credit shall be allowed for correspondence courses.

(4) All study shall be evaluated by authentic written examination, except where such examination is inappropriate, such as in seminar and practice court courses or courses which are principally concerned with legal writing and research.

(5) Clinical and like courses may, in the discretion of the law school, be substituted for classroom periods to the extent of no more than 20 of the required 80 semester hours, where:

(i) a description of the course has been filed with the Clerk of the Court of Appeals, either separately or in the law school's annual catalogue or bulletin;

(ii) the course is under the direct and immediate supervision of a member or members of the faculty;

(iii) the course includes adequate classroom meetings or seminars during the same semester in which the clinical work is completed in order to insure contemporaneous discussion, review and evaluation of the clinical experience; and

(iv) the law school certificate of attendance filed with the New York State Board of Law Examiners lists separately the credit allowed for clinical courses or other nonclassroom study.

(d) Full-Time Program Defined. A full-time program shall consist of at least 75 and no more than 105 calendar weeks in residence, including reading periods not to exceed one week per semester and examinations, of at least 10 classroom periods per week, scheduled principally between the hours of 8 a.m. and 6 p.m., totaling not less than the equivalent of 1,120 hours of classroom study, exclusive of examination time. A calendar week shall include four days of scheduled classes; however, no more than three three-day weeks per semester may be counted toward the 75-week minimum. A semester which includes successful completion of at least 10 credit hours per week of study shall be counted as 15 full-time weeks in residence toward the residency weeks requirement of this subdivision. As allowed under subdivision (h) of this section, a summer session which includes successful completion of at least 5 credit hours per week of study shall be counted as 7.5 full-time calendar weeks in residence toward the residency weeks requirement of this subdivision.

(e) Part-Time Program Defined. A part-time program shall consist of at least 105 and no more than 135 calendar weeks in residence, including reading periods not to exceed one week per semester and examinations, of at least eight classroom periods per week, irrespective of the hours at which the classroom periods are scheduled, totaling not less than the equivalent of 1,120 hours of classroom study, exclusive of examination time. A calendar week shall include three days of scheduled classes; however, no more than three two-day weeks per semester may be counted toward the 105-week minimum. A semester which includes successful completion of at least 8 credit hours per week of study shall be counted as 15 part-time weeks in residence toward the residency weeks requirement of this subdivision. As allowed under subdivision (h) of this section, a summer session which includes successful completion of at least 4 credit hours per week of study shall be counted as 7.5 part-time calendar weeks in residence toward the residency weeks requirement of this subdivision.

(f) Successful Completion Defined. Complete credit for an academic year, semester, quarter or summer session in an approved law school in which one or more courses have been failed shall not be given until the passing grades in the courses failed have been earned, or substitute courses successfully completed, or unless the failures are compensated for by a sufficiently high average for the same academic year, semester, quarter or summer session under acceptable regulations established by the law school in which the applicant is matriculated.

(g) Transfer from One Law School Program to Another. A student may transfer from a full-time to a part-time program, or from a part-time to a full-time program, at the end of any semester, quarter or other complete academic session. In computing residence credit:

(1) each week of a full-time program shall be deemed equal to one and one-third weeks of a part-time program; and

(2) each week of a part-time program shall be deemed equal to three-fourths of a week of a full-time program.

(h) Summer Session. Credit may be given for successful completion of courses taken in summer session only if such session is approved by the dean of the law school in which the applicant is matriculated.

(i) Credit for Law Study in Foreign Country. An approved law school may, in its discretion, allow such credit as it may determine toward the total credits required for a first degree in law to an applicant who studied law in a law school in a foreign country.

§ 520.4 Study of Law in Law Office

(a) General. An applicant may qualify to take the New York State bar examination by submitting to the New York State Board of Law Examiners satisfactory proof:

(1) that applicant commenced the study of law after applicant's 18th birthday; and

(2) that applicant successfully completed at least one academic year as a matriculated student in a full-time program or the equivalent in a part-time program at an approved law school and at the conclusion thereof was eligible to continue in that school's degree program; and

(3) that the applicant thereafter studied law in a law office or offices located within New York State under the supervision of one or more attorneys admitted to practice law in New York State, for such a period of time as, together with the credit allowed pursuant to this section for attendance in an approved law school, shall aggregate four years.

(b) Employment and Instruction Requirements. An applicant studying law in a law office or offices within New York State must be actually and continuously employed during the required period as a regular law clerk and student in a law office, under the direction and subject to the supervision of one or more attorneys admitted to practice law in New York State, and must be actually engaged in the practical work of such law office during normal business hours. In addition, the applicant must receive instruction from said attorney or attorneys in those subjects which are customarily taught in approved law schools.

(c) Credit for Attendance in Approved Law School. Credit shall be allowed for attendance in an approved law school as follows:

(1) credit of one full year or 52 weeks shall be allowed for any successfully completed year of a full-time law school program;

(2) credit of three quarters of a year or 39 weeks shall be allowed for any successfully completed year of a part-time law school program;

(3) proportionate credit shall be allowed for any successfully completed semester, quarter or summer session in such a full-time or part-time law school program;

(4) for any period of law school study not successfully completed, credit may be allowed for attendance as determined by the New York State Board of Law Examiners based on an evaluation of performance in the individual case.

(d) Vacations. Vacations taken by the applicant in excess of one month in any year of study shall be deducted from the period of law office study for which credit shall be given, but failure by the applicant to take a vacation shall not decrease the period of study required by this section.

(e) Certificate of Commencement of Law Office Study. It shall be the duty of the attorney or attorneys with whom a period of law office study is about to be commenced to obtain from, complete and file with, the Clerk of the Court of Appeals a certificate of commencement of clerkship, Appendix B-2, infra. At the time the certificate of commencement of clerkship is filed, the applicant shall provide the Court of Appeals with a copy of the determination of the New York State Board of Law Examiners of the credit to which the applicant is entitled under subdivision (c) of this section.

(f) Credit for Law Study in Law Office. Credit shall be given only for study in a law office or offices completed subsequent to the filing of the certificate required by subdivision (e) of this section.

(g) Proof Required. Compliance with the requirements of this section shall be proved to the satisfaction of the New York State Board of Law Examiners.

§ 520.5 Study of Law in Law School and Actual Practice

(a) General. An applicant who has studied law in any law school in any other state or territory of the United States or in the District of Columbia, other than a law school which grants credit for correspondence courses, and has received a degree from such law school which qualifies such applicant to practice law in such state, territory or in the District of Columbia, may qualify to take the New York State bar examination by submitting to the New York State Board of Law Examiners satisfactory proof:

(1) that applicant possesses the legal education required by this section;

(2) that applicant's course of study complies with the instructional and program requirements of section 520.3(c) through (i) of this Part; and

(3) that while admitted to the bar in the highest court in any state or territory of the United States or in the District of Columbia, applicant has actually practiced therein for at least five years of the seven years immediately preceding the application to sit for the bar examination.

(b) Proof Required. The applicant shall submit to the New York State Board of Law Examiners such proof of compliance with the provisions of this section as the board may require.

§ 520.6 Study of Law in Foreign Country; Required Legal Education

(a) General. An applicant who has studied in a foreign country may qualify to take the New York State bar examination by submitting to the New York State Board of Law Examiners satisfactory proof of the legal education required by this section.

(b) Legal Education.

(1) The applicant shall show fulfillment of the educational requirements for admission to the practice of law in a country other than the United States by successful completion of a period of law study at least substantially equivalent in duration to that required, under subdivisions (d) and (e) of section 520.3 of this Part, in a law school or schools each of which, throughout the period of applicant's study therein, was recognized by the competent accrediting agency of the government of such other country, or of a political subdivision thereof, as qualified and approved; and

(i) that such other country is one whose jurisprudence is based upon the principles of the English Common Law, and that the program and course of law study successfully completed by the applicant were the substantial equivalent of the legal education provided by an approved law school in the United States; or

(ii) if applicant does not meet the durational equivalency requirements of subdivision (b)(1) of this section but has at least two years of substantively equivalent education, or if the applicant does not meet the substantive equivalency requirements of subdivision (b)(1) (i) of this section, that applicant has successfully completed a full-time or part-time program consisting of a minimum of 20 semester hours of credit, or the equivalent, in professional law subjects, which includes basic courses in American law, in an approved law school in the United States; or

(2) The applicant shall show admission to practice law in a country other than the United States whose jurisprudence is based upon principles of English Common Law, where admission was based upon a program of study in a law school and/or law office recognized by the competent accrediting agency of the government of such other country and which is durationally equivalent yet substantively deficient under subdivision (b)(1)(i) of this section, and that such applicant has successfully completed a full-time or part-time program consisting of a minimum of 20 semester hours of credit, or the equivalent, in professional law subjects, which includes basic courses in American law, in an approved law school in the United States.

(c) Proof Required. The applicant shall submit to the New York State Board of Law Examiners such proof of compliance with the provisions of this section as the board may require.

§ 520.7 Certification by Board of Law Examiners

(a) Except as provided in section 520.10 of this Part, no applicant for admission to practice in this State shall be admitted unless the New York State Board of Law Examiners shall have certified to the Appellate Division of the department in which, as shown by the papers filed by the applicant with the board, the applicant resides, or if not a resident of the State, in which such papers show that applicant is employed full-time, or, if the applicant does not reside and is not employed full-time in the State, to the Appellate Division of the Third Department, that the applicant (1) has passed the written bar examination prescribed in section 520.8 of this Part, and (2) has also passed the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination described in section 520.9 of this Part.

(b) The requirement of this Part shall first be applicable to those candidates for admission to practice law in New York who qualify for and take the July 1982 regular New York State bar examination and to all those who thereafter qualify for and take such examinations.

§ 520.8 New York State Bar Examination

(a) General. The New York State Board of Law Examiners shall twice each year conduct a written bar examination consisting of legal problems in both adjective and substantive law, and it shall by rule prescribe a list of subjects which will indicate the general scope of the bar examination. The board may use the Multistate Bar Examination as part of the bar examination.

(b) Uniformity of Bar Examinations. The bar examinations shall be as nearly uniform from year to year as is reasonably practicable.

(c) Preservation of Papers. Bar examination papers shall be preserved for a period of four months from the date of the announcement of the results of the bar examination, and may thereafter be destroyed.

(d) Examination Fee. Every applicant for a bar examination shall pay to the New York State Board of Law Examiners the fee prescribed by section 465 of the Judiciary Law.

§ 520.9 Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination

(a) General. The Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination referred to in section 520.7 of this Part shall be the examination bearing that name which is administered by the National Conference of Bar Examiners.

(b) Requirements and Times and Places for Taking Examination. An applicant may take the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination prior or subsequent to completion of the requirements for taking the New York State bar examination. An application to take the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination shall be filed with the National Conference of Bar Examiners and the fee therefor shall be fixed by and paid to that conference, which shall also fix the times and places, within or without the State of New York, for taking the examination.

(c) Passing Score. The New York State Board of Law Examiners may accept the scores attained by individual applicants on the examination as determined and reported to it by the National Conference of Bar Examiners, but such board shall determine the passing score for applicants seeking admission to practice in this State.

(d) Reexamination. There shall be no restriction on the right of a failing applicant to retake the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination.

§ 520.10 Admission Without Examination

(a) General. In its discretion, the Appellate Division may admit to practice without examination an applicant who:

(1) (i) has been admitted to practice in the highest law court in any other state or territory of the United States or in the District of Columbia; or

(ii) has been admitted to practice as an attorney and counselor-at-law or the equivalent in the highest court in another country whose jurisprudence is based upon the principles of the English Common Law; and

(iii) is currently admitted to the bar in such other jurisdiction or jurisdictions, that at least one such jurisdiction in which the attorney is so admitted would similarly admit an attorney or counselor-at-law admitted to practice in New York State to its bar without examination; and

(2) (i) while admitted to practice as specified in paragraph (1) of this subdivision, has actually practiced therein, for at least five of the seven years immediately preceding the application:

(a) in its highest law court or highest court of original jurisdiction in the state or territory of the United States, in the District of Columbia or in the common law country where admitted; or

(b) in Federal military or civilian legal service in a position which requires admission to the bar for the appointment thereto or for the performance of the duties thereof, even if the government service, civilian or military, was not in a jurisdiction in which the applicant was admitted to practice; or

(c) in legal services as counsel or assistant counsel to a corporation in the state or territory of the United States where admitted, or in the District of Columbia if admitted therein; or in the common law country where admitted; or

(ii) has been employed in any other state or territory of the United States or in the District of Columbia as a judge, magistrate, referee or similar official for the local, state or federal government in a tribunal of record, or as a law clerk to such judicial official, provided that such employment requires admission to the bar for the appointment thereto or for the performance of the duties thereof, for at least five of the seven years immediately preceding the application; or

(iii) has been employed in this State or in any other state or territory of the United States or in the District of Columbia as a full-time member of the law faculty teaching in a law school or schools on the approved list of the American Bar Association and has attained the rank of professor or associate professor for at least five of the seven years immediately preceding the application; or

(iv) has actually practiced as provided in subparagraph (i) of this paragraph, or been employed as a judicial official as provided in subparagraph (ii) of this paragraph, or has been teaching at a law school as provided in subparagraph (iii) of this paragraph, or has actually practiced while admitted pursuant to Rule 520.11(a)(2) of this Part, for a period of up to 18 months, in a combination or cumulation of service among the categories of practice, judicial or legal service or teaching where the Appellate Division determines that such five years of combined or cumulative service is the equivalent of the practice required in clause (a) of subparagraph (i); and

(3) has received a first degree from an approved law school in the United States at the time of applicant's admission to practice in such other state, territory, district or common law country, or at the time of application for admission under this section; and

(4) is over 26 years of age.

(b) Proof Required. An applicant for admission under this section shall file with the Clerk of the Appellate Division of the department in which, as shown by the papers filed by the applicant with the department, the applicant resides or, if not a resident of the state in which such papers show that the applicant is employed full-time or, if such papers do not show that the applicant resides or is employed full-time in the State, the Appellate Division of the Third Department:

(1) a certificate from the clerk of the highest court of the state, territory, district or foreign country in which applicant has been admitted to practice as an attorney and counselor-at-law or the equivalent, certifying to applicant's admission to practice and the date thereof; and

(2) in the case of an applicant seeking admission relying upon teaching, a certificate from the dean of the law school which employs or employed the applicant, certifying to the nature and extent of applicant's employment and the rank attained; and

(3) a certificate from the New York State Board of Law Examiners certifying that the applicant has received a first degree in law from an approved law school as defined in section 520.3(b) of this Part; and

(4) any such other satisfactory evidence of character and qualifications as the Appellate Division may require, which may include a report of the National Conference of Bar Examiners.

(c) Proof to be Submitted and Fee to be Paid to New York State Board of Law Examiners. The applicant shall submit to the New York State Board of Law Examiners such proof of compliance with the provisions of paragraph (3) of subdivision (a) of this section as the board may require and shall at the same time pay the board the fee prescribed by section 465 of the Judiciary Law by certified check or money order payable to the order of the board.

(d) Discretion of Appellate Division. The Appellate Division may in its discretion impose as a condition to admission such other tests of character and fitness as it may deem proper.

§ 520.11 Admission Pro Hac Vice

(a) General. An attorney and counselor-at-law or the equivalent, who is a member in good standing of the bar of another state, territory, district or foreign country may be admitted pro hac vice:

(1) in the discretion of any court of record, to participate in any matter in which the attorney is employed;

(2) in the discretion of the Appellate Division, provided applicant is a graduate of an approved law school, to advise and represent clients and participate in any matter during the continuance of the applicant's employment or association with an organization described in subdivision 7 of section 495 of the Judiciary Law or during employment with a District Attorney, Corporation Counsel or the Attorney General, but in no event for longer than 18 months.

(b) New York Law Students. A graduate student or graduate assistant at an approved law school in New York State may be admitted pro hac vice in the discretion of the Appellate Division, to advise and represent clients or participate in any matter during the continuance of applicant's enrollment in an approved law school in New York State as a graduate student or graduate assistant, or during applicant's employment as a law school teacher in an approved law school in New York State, if applicant is in good standing as an attorney and counselor-at-law or the equivalent of the bar of another state, territory, district or foreign country and is engaged to advise or represent the client through participation in an organization described in subdivision 7 of section 495 of the Judiciary Law or during employment with a District Attorney, Corporation Counsel or the Attorney General, but in no event for longer than 18 months.

(c) Association of New York Counsel. No attorney may be admitted pro hac vice pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) to participate in pre-trial or trial proceedings unless he or she is associated with an attorney who is a member in good standing of the New York bar, who shall be the attorney of record in the matter.

(d) Professional Responsibility Requirements. An attorney admitted pro hac vice pursuant to this section:

(1) shall be familiar with and shall comply with the standards of professional conduct imposed upon members of the New York bar, including the rules of court governing the conduct of attorneys and the Disciplinary Rules of the Code of Professional Responsibility; and

(2) shall be subject to the jurisdiction of the courts of this State with respect to any acts occurring during the course of the attorney's participation in the matter.

§ 520.12 Proof of Moral Character

(a) General. Every applicant for admission to practice must file with a committee on character and fitness appointed by the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court affidavits of reputable persons that applicant possesses the good moral character and general fitness requisite for an attorney and counselor-at-law as required by section 90 of the Judiciary Law. The number of such affidavits and the qualifications of persons acceptable as affiants shall be determined by the Appellate Division to which the applicant has been certified.

(b) Affidavits. The affidavits filed shall state that the applicant is, to the knowledge of the affiant, a person of good moral character and possesses the general fitness requisite for an attorney and counselor-at-law and shall set forth in detail the facts upon which such knowledge is based. Such affidavits shall not be conclusive proof as to character and fitness, and the Appellate Division to which the applicant has been certified may inquire further through its committee on character and fitness or otherwise.

(c) Discretion of Appellate Division. The Appellate Division in each department may adopt for its department such additional procedures for ascertaining the moral character and general fitness of applicants as it may deem proper, which may include submission of a report of the National Conference of Bar Examiners.

(d) Time to File Affidavits.

(1) Except as provided in paragraph (2) of this subdivision, every applicant for admission to practice, other than applicants for admission without examination pursuant to section 520.10 of this Part, shall file the affidavits required under subdivision (a) and any additional material required under subdivision (c) of this section within three years from the date of the letter sent by the New York State Board of Law Examiners notifying the applicant that the applicant has passed the bar examination prescribed in section 520.8 of this Part. The requirements of this subdivision shall first be applicable to those applicants for admission who pass the July 1994 bar examination.

(2) Any applicant for admission to practice who has passed the bar examination prescribed in section 520.8 of this Part, administered prior to July 1994, and who has not filed the affidavits required under subdivision (a) and additional material required under subdivision (c) of this section, must file such affidavits within three years from the date of the letter sent by the New York State Board of Law Examiners notifying the applicant that the applicant has passed the bar examination, or by November 9, 1995, whichever date is later.

§ 520.13 Designation of Agent for Service of Process

(a) Every applicant for admission to practice who does not reside and is not employed full-time in the State shall be required, as a condition of admission, to execute and file, with the Appellate Division of the department in which the applicant is being admitted, a duly acknowledged instrument in writing setting forth the applicant's residence or mailing address and designating the clerk of such Appellate Division as the applicant's agent upon whom process may be served, with like effect as if served personally upon the applicant, in any action or proceeding thereafter brought against the applicant and arising out of or based upon any legal services rendered or offered to be rendered by the applicant within the State.

(b) Any such applicant may, at any time after being admitted to practice, revoke a designation filed with the Appellate Division pursuant to subdivision (a) of this section by executing and filing with such Appellate Division an affidavit revoking such designation and showing that, as of the date of such affidavit, the applicant resides or is employed full-time in the State or has an office therein for the practice of law; except such revocation shall be effective only with respect to causes of action accruing after the filing thereof.

(c) Service of process on the clerk of the Appellate Division, pursuant to a designation filed pursuant to subdivision (a) of this section, shall be made by personally delivering to and leaving with such clerk, or with a deputy or assistant authorized to receive such service at the clerk's office, duplicate copies of the process together with a fee of $25. Service of process shall be complete when such clerk has been so served. Such clerk shall promptly send one copy of the process to the person to whom it is directed, by certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to such person at the address specified in the designation or at such other address as such person shall have specified in a duly acknowledged supplemental instrument in writing which such person shall have filed in the office of such clerk.

§ 520.14 Application for Waiver of Rules

The Court of Appeals, upon application, may in its discretion vary the application of or waive any provision of these rules where strict compliance will cause undue hardship to the applicant. Such application shall be in the form of a verified petition setting forth the applicant's name, age and residence address, the facts relied upon and a prayer for relief.

§ 520.15 Rules of the New York State Board of Law Examiners

The New York State Board of Law Examiners may from time to time adopt, amend or rescind rules, not inconsistent with these Rules, as it shall deem necessary and proper to enable it to discharge its duties as such duties are established by Law and by these rules. The rules so established by the Board shall not be adopted, amended or rescinded except by a majority vote of the members thereof.

A copy of each rule, adopted, amended or rescinded must, within 30 days of such action, be filed in the office of the Secretary of State.
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