Training for Law and Economics


Interalia
I was wondering if anybody knows of any university which provides instruction either in the form of an accelerated degree in economics or a graduate diploma in economics that does not require undergraduate maths courses as a pre-requisite for admission.

I did my undergraduate legal studies in a university which did not believe in inter-disciplinary work and feel that my lack of training in economics and maths has handicapped me especially in light of the fact that a lot of legal literature nowadays is focused on the economic analysis of law.

I do know that there is a European Master in Law and Economics, but after reading the course syllabus I do not think the masters program is suitable for my needs because of the lack of math courses. Would appreciate any input, especially from those who specialize in law and economics.
I was wondering if anybody knows of any university which provides instruction either in the form of an accelerated degree in economics or a graduate diploma in economics that does not require undergraduate maths courses as a pre-requisite for admission.

I did my undergraduate legal studies in a university which did not believe in inter-disciplinary work and feel that my lack of training in economics and maths has handicapped me especially in light of the fact that a lot of legal literature nowadays is focused on the economic analysis of law.

I do know that there is a European Master in Law and Economics, but after reading the course syllabus I do not think the masters program is suitable for my needs because of the lack of math courses. Would appreciate any input, especially from those who specialize in law and economics.
quote
L&E
George Mason offers a LLM in law and Econ.. you might want to look @ that.

Apart from that, there is no formal course that gives you a 'quick fix" diploma in Economics.

But we are bound by a common predicament dear Sir :) I also did my graduation from a University that is not particularly given to spirit of inquiry, interdisciplinary or otherwise; I am equally interested in adding to my arsenal ( my academic work involves application of L&E to Corporate and securities regulation)

However, to say that you would be handicapped is rather strong expression. The definition of what constitutes L&E is fairly broad (cf. the John Olin program working papers @ Chicago, Harvard) and some established names in the movement work without models and regressions. Macey, Miller, Langevoort come to mind. Even Romano, when she goes solo, does not use a lot of numbers although her SOX-related work has drawn on basic stats. And then of course we have Cass Sunstein. Macey has a Honoris Causa doctorate from Stockholm.

You might want to consider focusing on Institutional Economics that works less with numbers and political economy/public choice scholarship that may be reproduced without formal models.

If you are interested in making research your chosen career, you may apply for a fellowship (CLS, HLS, U Chi. offer fellowships) and use the period to learn about running regressions and elementary calculus and maths.

that said, we are lawyers at the end of the day and our discipline is unique. The excessive use of Mathematics in economics and in turn in L&E should therefore not discourage you.
George Mason offers a LLM in law and Econ.. you might want to look @ that.

Apart from that, there is no formal course that gives you a 'quick fix" diploma in Economics.

But we are bound by a common predicament dear Sir :) I also did my graduation from a University that is not particularly given to spirit of inquiry, interdisciplinary or otherwise; I am equally interested in adding to my arsenal ( my academic work involves application of L&E to Corporate and securities regulation)

However, to say that you would be handicapped is rather strong expression. The definition of what constitutes L&E is fairly broad (cf. the John Olin program working papers @ Chicago, Harvard) and some established names in the movement work without models and regressions. Macey, Miller, Langevoort come to mind. Even Romano, when she goes solo, does not use a lot of numbers although her SOX-related work has drawn on basic stats. And then of course we have Cass Sunstein. Macey has a Honoris Causa doctorate from Stockholm.

You might want to consider focusing on Institutional Economics that works less with numbers and political economy/public choice scholarship that may be reproduced without formal models.

If you are interested in making research your chosen career, you may apply for a fellowship (CLS, HLS, U Chi. offer fellowships) and use the period to learn about running regressions and elementary calculus and maths.

that said, we are lawyers at the end of the day and our discipline is unique. The excessive use of Mathematics in economics and in turn in L&E should therefore not discourage you.
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