First degree in law


RPFUGB
In the field of LL.M.'s one must have a first degree in law.

In Belgium Law Students can only be admitted to the Bar after having studied law for 5 years. These five years are divided in two degrees. The first one is a Bachelor in Law degree which is general and takes three years. The second one is a Master degree (NOT GRADUATE, But undergraduate I guess), which takes two years and leaves all curricular choices to the students.

In that respect I have discovered that the US would consider the first degree in law the Master degree as we know it (fourth and fifth year of law school), and not the bachelor degree. As only the Master degree grants access to the bar exams. Would You agree?


WOuld it be so that the first degree in law is the Master degree?
In the field of LL.M.'s one must have a first degree in law.

In Belgium Law Students can only be admitted to the Bar after having studied law for 5 years. These five years are divided in two “degrees”. The first one is a Bachelor in Law degree which is general and takes three years. The second one is a Master degree (NOT GRADUATE, But undergraduate I guess…), which takes two years and leaves all curricular choices to the students.

In that respect I have discovered that the US would consider the first degree in law the Master degree as we know it (fourth and fifth year of law school), and not the bachelor degree. As only the Master degree grants access to the bar exams. Would You agree?


WOuld it be so that the first degree in law is the Master degree?
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The typical student in the USA studies for four years in any subject, which is a bachelor's degree. Then the student studies law for an additional three years, for the JD, which is a first degree in law but a graduate degree. The LLM would then follow that, although (at least before this terrible recession) not many USA students obtain the LLM.

The system here is a little odd then: you earn an LLM (which is by its terms a "masters" after you earn a JD (which is by its terms a "doctor" degree)!
The typical student in the USA studies for four years in any subject, which is a bachelor's degree. Then the student studies law for an additional three years, for the JD, which is a first degree in law but a graduate degree. The LLM would then follow that, although (at least before this terrible recession) not many USA students obtain the LLM.

The system here is a little odd then: you earn an LLM (which is by its terms a "masters" after you earn a JD (which is by its terms a "doctor" degree)!
quote

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