Brand-Name-Universities


Imagine you are a civil law lawyer, with one or two LLMs in good universities (but not in "brand-name-universities"), and a good work experience. Would you give a last shot to a "brand-name-university" of a common law jurisdiction just for the "brand-name"? If so, which universites do you think are the "brand-name-universities" of these days?

By "brand-name-universities" I mean those universites that, even if they are not in rankings as good as other universities, their names are so important and well-known that make them "better" (for the CV) than the ones leading the rankings. The classic example is Harvard. Depending on the specialization of the LLM, you can find that Harvard is not the best university to go, but still I would prefer to go to Harvard because of the name and what it represents.

The classic "brand-name-universities", at least a few years ago, were, in my view, Harvard, Yale, Stanford, Oxford, and Cambridge. Do you think they are still the same? Would you add another one?

Imagine you are a civil law lawyer, with one or two LLMs in good universities (but not in "brand-name-universities"), and a good work experience. Would you give a last shot to a "brand-name-university" of a common law jurisdiction just for the "brand-name"? If so, which universites do you think are the "brand-name-universities" of these days?

By "brand-name-universities" I mean those universites that, even if they are not in rankings as good as other universities, their names are so important and well-known that make them "better" (for the CV) than the ones leading the rankings. The classic example is Harvard. Depending on the specialization of the LLM, you can find that Harvard is not the best university to go, but still I would prefer to go to Harvard because of the name and what it represents.

The classic "brand-name-universities", at least a few years ago, were, in my view, Harvard, Yale, Stanford, Oxford, and Cambridge. Do you think they are still the same? Would you add another one?
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Dutchman

The answer is: NO. Seriously, nobody needs more than 1 LL.M. In my home country (also a civil law background), the common statement of all major law firms is that an LL.M. mainly improves your language skills. There ARE exceptions, of course, when it comes to the big names (the ones you mentioned). HOWEVER (!), if you are accepted at these universities, then your profile already is so good that you don't need a second LL.M.

The answer is: NO. Seriously, nobody needs more than 1 LL.M. In my home country (also a civil law background), the common statement of all major law firms is that an LL.M. mainly improves your language skills. There ARE exceptions, of course, when it comes to the big names (the ones you mentioned). HOWEVER (!), if you are accepted at these universities, then your profile already is so good that you don't need a second LL.M.
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beicon

I agree with Dutchman one hundred percent... and I'm also from a civil law country...

I agree with Dutchman one hundred percent... and I'm also from a civil law country...
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I see... I double the bet: what if you receive a full scholarship for an LLM in those universities? Would you do it to have that stamp in your CV, or you still think it does not worth it?

I see... I double the bet: what if you receive a full scholarship for an LLM in those universities? Would you do it to have that stamp in your CV, or you still think it does not worth it?
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Dutchman

Well, if you get a full scholarship for, let's say, Harvard, then you must be very very good. I doubt that you would have any difficulties in finding the job you want on the market in this case. Hence, the additional LL.M. will probably not improve your prospects!
Personally, I could even imagine that having 2-3 LL.M. titles might be seen as a disadvantage from an employer's perspective, as it might signal that the applicant is not really willing to actually work.
However, if you get a full scholarship and really really want to do it, then - for the sake of it - go for it! You'll certainly enjoy yourself. From a career-related point of view, I don't think it makes too much sense.

Btw, would you mind telling us which country you are from?

Well, if you get a full scholarship for, let's say, Harvard, then you must be very very good. I doubt that you would have any difficulties in finding the job you want on the market in this case. Hence, the additional LL.M. will probably not improve your prospects!
Personally, I could even imagine that having 2-3 LL.M. titles might be seen as a disadvantage from an employer's perspective, as it might signal that the applicant is not really willing to actually work.
However, if you get a full scholarship and really really want to do it, then - for the sake of it - go for it! You'll certainly enjoy yourself. From a career-related point of view, I don't think it makes too much sense.

Btw, would you mind telling us which country you are from?
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Mmmm its a difficult situation. If you receive a full scholarship maybe is not a bad idea to do it.

It is clear that you dont need it but you can do it for the sake of having that in your CV. I think, as the others said, that probably it is not important or necessary at this moment, and that it could even be a disadvantage from an employer´s perspective, but I think it could be usefull and imoportant when you are older. First, because its a good way to sell yourself... as stupid as it might sound, the truth is that people always have a special consideration for "harvard boys". Second, because doing an LLM is an excelent opportunity to make new friends and networking, and that is always important for a lawyer.

Maybe Columbia its becoming a "band-name-university" (as you called them)? Im not sure!

Mmmm its a difficult situation. If you receive a full scholarship maybe is not a bad idea to do it.

It is clear that you dont need it but you can do it for the sake of having that in your CV. I think, as the others said, that probably it is not important or necessary at this moment, and that it could even be a disadvantage from an employer´s perspective, but I think it could be usefull and imoportant when you are older. First, because its a good way to sell yourself... as stupid as it might sound, the truth is that people always have a special consideration for "harvard boys". Second, because doing an LLM is an excelent opportunity to make new friends and networking, and that is always important for a lawyer.

Maybe Columbia its becoming a "band-name-university" (as you called them)? Im not sure!
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