LLM TAX - Maastricht


Students, former students, what about the LLM in Taxation at Maastricht!! Any input??

Students, former students, what about the LLM in Taxation at Maastricht!! Any input??
quote
Jesse C.

In September 2007 I started the LL.M. degree in 'International and European Tax Law' at Maastricht University.

Considering the fact that I am Dutch, I would like to mention that what I especially enjoy about the degree in Maastricht is meeting the students from different countries. It truly is an 'international' degree. In my year there are students from Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Indonesia and Portugal. Last February we were joined by students from the new EU Member States.
Meeting these people obviously means you are also confronted with foreign tax systems and that is what the degree is all about. This cultural mix in the tutorial groups finds great expression in the course 'Corporate taxation' (one of the first courses in the academic year) for example: how do other jurisdictions perceive thin capitalisation rules? Moreover, having a German in your tutorial group certainly makes discussing the Lankhorst-Hohorst case (even) more exciting.

Furthermore, I have to say that the faculty staff are most approachable. I have heard stories about the relationship between the professor and the student in other countries. Apparently it is not uncommon to have an environment in which the professor is considered to be 'god' and the student the ordinary mortal.
This is certainly not the case in Maastricht. Lively discussions during the tutorials and lectures are really encouraged. If you dissent from prof. Prokisch regarding the question whether there is a permanent establishment or not, you are invited to share your legal reasoning.
The staff are not only interested in hearing from the students during lessons; there is always room for a personal talk. There are still 5 months left in the academic year and as far as I know we have already been invited twice for a drink in the local pub by different professors. Last November a professor and a university teacher took us out for lunch.

Lastly, I would like to stress that the staff really go to great lenghts to provide the best eductional experience. It has happened that extra tutorials were put in without the tutors receiving the corresponding remuneration. Additional lectures are offered for those students starting the degree in February who have obviously missed the introductory courses and who might not be that familiar with certain aspects of (European) tax law. These examples clearly show that the staff are passionate about the field they are in.

I hope I have given an insight into the LL.M. degree in Maastricht. If there are any questions do not hesitate to respond to this message as I will automatically receive a notification via e-mail.

P.S. I have not mentioned the beauty of the city of Maastricht, but you will see for yourself when you get there!

In September 2007 I started the LL.M. degree in 'International and European Tax Law' at Maastricht University.

Considering the fact that I am Dutch, I would like to mention that what I especially enjoy about the degree in Maastricht is meeting the students from different countries. It truly is an 'international' degree. In my year there are students from Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Indonesia and Portugal. Last February we were joined by students from the new EU Member States.
Meeting these people obviously means you are also confronted with foreign tax systems and that is what the degree is all about. This cultural mix in the tutorial groups finds great expression in the course 'Corporate taxation' (one of the first courses in the academic year) for example: how do other jurisdictions perceive thin capitalisation rules? Moreover, having a German in your tutorial group certainly makes discussing the Lankhorst-Hohorst case (even) more exciting.

Furthermore, I have to say that the faculty staff are most approachable. I have heard stories about the relationship between the professor and the student in other countries. Apparently it is not uncommon to have an environment in which the professor is considered to be 'god' and the student the ordinary mortal.
This is certainly not the case in Maastricht. Lively discussions during the tutorials and lectures are really encouraged. If you dissent from prof. Prokisch regarding the question whether there is a permanent establishment or not, you are invited to share your legal reasoning.
The staff are not only interested in hearing from the students during lessons; there is always room for a personal talk. There are still 5 months left in the academic year and as far as I know we have already been invited twice for a drink in the local pub by different professors. Last November a professor and a university teacher took us out for lunch.

Lastly, I would like to stress that the staff really go to great lenghts to provide the best eductional experience. It has happened that extra tutorials were put in without the tutors receiving the corresponding remuneration. Additional lectures are offered for those students starting the degree in February who have obviously missed the introductory courses and who might not be that familiar with certain aspects of (European) tax law. These examples clearly show that the staff are passionate about the field they are in.

I hope I have given an insight into the LL.M. degree in Maastricht. If there are any questions do not hesitate to respond to this message as I will automatically receive a notification via e-mail.

P.S. I have not mentioned the beauty of the city of Maastricht, but you will see for yourself when you get there!
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