REQUIREMENTS TO PRACTICE LAW IN CANADA AND STEPS O TAKE IN THAT REGARD


Hello, my name is Omotolu from Nigeria. I currently completed the law school programme in Nigeria and would love to further my academic career by taking a master in law programme in canada and i would like a vivid explanation on whether i can practice in canada. if no, i would love a detailed explanation on how i can practice law in canada and the steps to take in that regard bearing in mind the immigration requirements.
also, is it preferrable for me to take the masters programme first before on embarking on the practicing requirement in canada? Thank you
Hello, my name is Omotolu from Nigeria. I currently completed the law school programme in Nigeria and would love to further my academic career by taking a master in law programme in canada and i would like a vivid explanation on whether i can practice in canada. if no, i would love a detailed explanation on how i can practice law in canada and the steps to take in that regard bearing in mind the immigration requirements.
also, is it preferrable for me to take the masters programme first before on embarking on the practicing requirement in canada? Thank you
quote
chicken so...
Typically, the first step would be to have your education evaluated by the NCA. They may tell you that you need more studies, or particular classes, or take particular exams. You'd have to do what they ask, then you'd get a Certificate of Qualification.

Then you'd have to complete the bar admissions course and articling period. This varies from province to province, but typically the bar admissions course might be something like the CPLED, which mixes online and in-class studies. The articling process takes 9-12 months of working in a law firm.

Immigration / visas are another matter altogether; you'd have to do a bit of research on which visa you'd need to apply for and if you're eligible.

Certainly a master's program can't hurt, especially if the classes are suggested by the NCA, plus you could apply for a post-study work visa, which would help with articling, I'd imagine. However, as far as I know, an LLM or master's program is not *specifically* required.

There's a lot of info out there - I suggest you do a bit of Googling.
Typically, the first step would be to have your education evaluated by the NCA. They may tell you that you need more studies, or particular classes, or take particular exams. You'd have to do what they ask, then you'd get a Certificate of Qualification.

Then you'd have to complete the bar admissions course and articling period. This varies from province to province, but typically the bar admissions course might be something like the CPLED, which mixes online and in-class studies. The articling process takes 9-12 months of working in a law firm.

Immigration / visas are another matter altogether; you'd have to do a bit of research on which visa you'd need to apply for and if you're eligible.

Certainly a master's program can't hurt, especially if the classes are suggested by the NCA, plus you could apply for a post-study work visa, which would help with articling, I'd imagine. However, as far as I know, an LLM or master's program is not *specifically* required.

There's a lot of info out there - I suggest you do a bit of Googling.
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