Practising Law in Canada


akiela
Oh thanks a lot LLMARK!
I'll do more research on those schools


akiela
Oh thanks a lot LLMARK!
I'll do more research on those schools


akiela
quote
rajahpuri
Hey guyz .. Im newcomer in Canada and have done LLB from Pakistan.Im also a member of Punjab Bar Council there. I know nothing about how to carry on with my profession here.
Kindly give me some idea.
Hey guyz .. Im newcomer in Canada and have done LLB from Pakistan.Im also a member of Punjab Bar Council there. I know nothing about how to carry on with my profession here.
Kindly give me some idea.
quote
maybe this will help a bit:

an llb in canada is not the same degree as an llb in most other countries (i.e. uk/aust/hk/etc). what i mean by that is that although it is offically recorded as an undergraduate degree, a better name might be professional degree, or a .75 graduate degree (i dunno).

though there may be exceptions but: to apply to a canadian llb program you need a minimum of 2 yrs at a recognized (no idea...call it canadian) university. remember that is a min. in my year of 160 students, i believe 4-5 have that. the remaining 150+ have at least an undergraduate degree (most think that an undergraduate degree is the minimum, not knowing about the two year minimum exception).

i'm sure the law society will give many a reasons why this or that is the way it is, but consider this information if you are graduating from an llb in another jurisdiction (meaning, many people in admin. positions think of it, rightly or wrongly, as simply an undergraduate degree). i have no idea what the real practical implications are. i suspect you will need additional credits or tests or somethign of the like. i simply know that i have heard many people talk of uk/aust/hk law degrees as true undergrad. degrees.

fyi--because of this confusion a few schools in canada have recently either switched to calling their degrees JD or are currently voting on it-student and fac. vote (usually a student lead charge with opposition from traditionalist professors). some examples: Western University had a close but unsuccessful vote (i understand they will try again soon); Queen's had a successful vote and i have heard they are awaiting confirmation from the school senate; UofT has already switched (i believe students have an option of calling it one or the other). What does this mean? nothing really, it is a change in name only so that people internationally recognize that a canadian llb has essentially the same requirments as the american JD and is (in this case "was") like the uk/aust/hk/sing/etc in name only (again, maybe there are vast similarities--just going by what ive heard).

excuse the typing and spelling..amazingly...in class!


out
maybe this will help a bit:

an llb in canada is not the same degree as an llb in most other countries (i.e. uk/aust/hk/etc). what i mean by that is that although it is offically recorded as an undergraduate degree, a better name might be professional degree, or a .75 graduate degree (i dunno).

though there may be exceptions but: to apply to a canadian llb program you need a minimum of 2 yrs at a recognized (no idea...call it canadian) university. remember that is a min. in my year of 160 students, i believe 4-5 have that. the remaining 150+ have at least an undergraduate degree (most think that an undergraduate degree is the minimum, not knowing about the two year minimum exception).

i'm sure the law society will give many a reasons why this or that is the way it is, but consider this information if you are graduating from an llb in another jurisdiction (meaning, many people in admin. positions think of it, rightly or wrongly, as simply an undergraduate degree). i have no idea what the real practical implications are. i suspect you will need additional credits or tests or somethign of the like. i simply know that i have heard many people talk of uk/aust/hk law degrees as true undergrad. degrees.

fyi--because of this confusion a few schools in canada have recently either switched to calling their degrees JD or are currently voting on it-student and fac. vote (usually a student lead charge with opposition from traditionalist professors). some examples: Western University had a close but unsuccessful vote (i understand they will try again soon); Queen's had a successful vote and i have heard they are awaiting confirmation from the school senate; UofT has already switched (i believe students have an option of calling it one or the other). What does this mean? nothing really, it is a change in name only so that people internationally recognize that a canadian llb has essentially the same requirments as the american JD and is (in this case "was") like the uk/aust/hk/sing/etc in name only (again, maybe there are vast similarities--just going by what ive heard).

excuse the typing and spelling..amazingly...in class!


out
quote
Hi there,

Could someone assist me on the following:

1. Which Canadian law school is better off (i.e. fees, documentary hassles involved, education standards vs. possibility for better prospects in the legal mainstream) for continuing further schooling in Canada?

2. How many years of residency necessary in U of O or any law school in canada for that matter before I can graduate and be admitted to the Bar Society, say Alberta and thereafter practice law in Canada. I have undertaken my law schooling in the Philippines with deficiencies in 2 subjects prior to graduation. Now, presently out of the country for work but intending to pursue efforts towards eventual law practice in Canada.

Can someone help enlighten? Thanks.
Hi there,

Could someone assist me on the following:

1. Which Canadian law school is better off (i.e. fees, documentary hassles involved, education standards vs. possibility for better prospects in the legal mainstream) for continuing further schooling in Canada?

2. How many years of residency necessary in U of O or any law school in canada for that matter before I can graduate and be admitted to the Bar Society, say Alberta and thereafter practice law in Canada. I have undertaken my law schooling in the Philippines with deficiencies in 2 subjects prior to graduation. Now, presently out of the country for work but intending to pursue efforts towards eventual law practice in Canada.

Can someone help enlighten? Thanks.

quote
The easiest route to the NAFTA country law degree combo is through joint JD/LLb programs which are available through Detroit Mercy JD/LLB/LED so you get three degress Canadian, US and Mexican in 5 years if you just want to do US/Canada there are great programs in Michigan STate Univ., NYU, American University, Vermont Law School. You may also want to try applying to a Canadian Law school as an advanced standing student if you already have a common law degree at a program like UBC. It would take 2 years, but anyway you look at it it's going to take a similar amount of time and the UBC degree is a JD, so you have a different academic degree, not just another llb.
The easiest route to the NAFTA country law degree combo is through joint JD/LLb programs which are available through Detroit Mercy JD/LLB/LED so you get three degress Canadian, US and Mexican in 5 years if you just want to do US/Canada there are great programs in Michigan STate Univ., NYU, American University, Vermont Law School. You may also want to try applying to a Canadian Law school as an advanced standing student if you already have a common law degree at a program like UBC. It would take 2 years, but anyway you look at it it's going to take a similar amount of time and the UBC degree is a JD, so you have a different academic degree, not just another llb.
quote
P_Martini
Hi there,

Could someone assist me on the following:

. . .

2. How many years of residency necessary in U of O or any law school in canada for that matter before I can graduate and be admitted to the Bar Society, say Alberta and thereafter practice law in Canada. I have undertaken my law schooling in the Philippines with deficiencies in 2 subjects prior to graduation. Now, presently out of the country for work but intending to pursue efforts towards eventual law practice in Canada.



I am not sure what you mean by "deficiencies in 2 subjects prior to graduation". I assume it means you have not obtained your Philippine law degree. If you have obtained it or if you will obtain it, I might direct you to this thread. If you have not obtained it and will not obtain it, then I suppose the question is how many of your credits, if any, you will be able to apply towards a Canadian law degree. If that is your question, I'm sorry that I have no information for you.
<blockquote>Hi there,

Could someone assist me on the following:

. . .

2. How many years of residency necessary in U of O or any law school in canada for that matter before I can graduate and be admitted to the Bar Society, say Alberta and thereafter practice law in Canada. I have undertaken my law schooling in the Philippines with deficiencies in 2 subjects prior to graduation. Now, presently out of the country for work but intending to pursue efforts towards eventual law practice in Canada.

</blockquote>

I am not sure what you mean by "deficiencies in 2 subjects prior to graduation". I assume it means you have not obtained your Philippine law degree. If you have obtained it or if you will obtain it, I might direct you to <a href="http://www.llm-guide.com/board/21014">this</a> thread. If you have not obtained it and will not obtain it, then I suppose the question is how many of your credits, if any, you will be able to apply towards a Canadian law degree. If that is your question, I'm sorry that I have no information for you.
quote
jm27
I have a scots law llb and want to practice in BC. i've tried to contact the NCA but so far no response. i understand that i will have to do some exams to get an accreditation certificate and then complete the articling period. can anyone give me some idea of how many exams i'll have to do and the overall difficulty of becoming a qualified solicitor in BC? i may be able to soon get permanent residency which would help with fee's but was wondering how receptive law schools are to people wishing to complete only the courses they have been set by the NCA? thanks in advance for any help.
I have a scots law llb and want to practice in BC. i've tried to contact the NCA but so far no response. i understand that i will have to do some exams to get an accreditation certificate and then complete the articling period. can anyone give me some idea of how many exams i'll have to do and the overall difficulty of becoming a qualified solicitor in BC? i may be able to soon get permanent residency which would help with fee's but was wondering how receptive law schools are to people wishing to complete only the courses they have been set by the NCA? thanks in advance for any help.
quote
Good afternoon everyone, I have just recently finished a 4-year LLB as a distant learner from a reputed university in the UK. I wish to travel to Canada for the LLM, I have read numerous discussions here which ultimately state that even with the LLM, a foreign educated lawyer cannot practice in Canada, though, one can, by applying to the NCA. My query to you folks is, that how long will it approximately take for me to finish six NCA examinations and eight one semester courses at a Canadian law school, after the LLM. Moreover, if this route is advisable if ultimately I want to practice in Canada?
Also, if I chose to do a Canadian LLB/JD as opposed to the LLM, how long will that take me? And is that advisable?
Good afternoon everyone, I have just recently finished a 4-year LLB as a distant learner from a reputed university in the UK. I wish to travel to Canada for the LLM, I have read numerous discussions here which ultimately state that even with the LLM, a foreign educated lawyer cannot practice in Canada, though, one can, by applying to the NCA. My query to you folks is, that how long will it approximately take for me to finish six NCA examinations and eight one semester courses at a Canadian law school, after the LLM. Moreover, if this route is advisable if ultimately I want to practice in Canada?
Also, if I chose to do a Canadian LLB/JD as opposed to the LLM, how long will that take me? And is that advisable?
quote
nezar
hi
i have master in law from Jordan
what should i do to practising law in canada ?
hi
i have master in law from Jordan
what should i do to practising law in canada ?
quote
PAMELLA
I have an foreign LLB degree and working now I would like to know how much would it cost me to do the Canadian LLB.
I have an foreign LLB degree and working now I would like to know how much would it cost me to do the Canadian LLB.
quote
aker
Dear all,

It seems practicing law in Canada is not easy. The most difficult, and rather irrational requirement is to impose on foreign qualified lawyers to take up courses for a couple of years at a Canadian law schools, at a time where most international bars apply a direct transfer scheme.

I noticed however that the Quebec bar allows a direct transfer scheme if the foreign candidate is admitted to a bar that allows canadians to sit that foreign bar exam without having to go back to law school. One of those bars is the solicitors regulation authority in England.

I am admitted at a civil law country that does not probably require canadians to enter law school first before sitting the bar exams. However, I was thinking to sit the QLTS test in England hoping in this way to apply for the Quebec bar without having to pass by a canadian law school, which can be cumbersome. In any case, the SRA in England allows canadians admitted to most of the bars in Canada to directly sit the transfer scheme exams.

Is anyone here a UK qualified solicitor who has done so in Canada, or any other non-UK lawyer who considered this option.

I have completed an LLM in the UK and now completing a PhD in France, not sure though this would impact my application from the readings on this blog.

Look forward to hear any feedback.
Dear all,

It seems practicing law in Canada is not easy. The most difficult, and rather irrational requirement is to impose on foreign qualified lawyers to take up courses for a couple of years at a Canadian law schools, at a time where most international bars apply a direct transfer scheme.

I noticed however that the Quebec bar allows a direct transfer scheme if the foreign candidate is admitted to a bar that allows canadians to sit that foreign bar exam without having to go back to law school. One of those bars is the solicitors regulation authority in England.

I am admitted at a civil law country that does not probably require canadians to enter law school first before sitting the bar exams. However, I was thinking to sit the QLTS test in England hoping in this way to apply for the Quebec bar without having to pass by a canadian law school, which can be cumbersome. In any case, the SRA in England allows canadians admitted to most of the bars in Canada to directly sit the transfer scheme exams.

Is anyone here a UK qualified solicitor who has done so in Canada, or any other non-UK lawyer who considered this option.

I have completed an LLM in the UK and now completing a PhD in France, not sure though this would impact my application from the readings on this blog.

Look forward to hear any feedback.
quote
KK123
Hi there,

Can anyone tell me that if I came from a Civil law country but I completed my LL.M in New York and passed NY bar exam.

How many subjects/exams I have to take?

Many thanks!!
Hi there,

Can anyone tell me that if I came from a Civil law country but I completed my LL.M in New York and passed NY bar exam.

How many subjects/exams I have to take?

Many thanks!!
quote

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