Canada


Nina
Vid- I am not sure when they go out. Hang in there...

Reiko- You really should check the requirements for the province where you intend to practice. All provinces are different but I think that most DO have bar exams. In Ontario, for instance (if practicing in Toronto or capital city Ottawa), you must attend a 4 month bar admission course and write exams at the end of each module. I think they are changing it but that is how it worked in the past. The exams were not nearly as tough as NY bar exams but still something to consider. Also, the bar admissions courses can be costly. If you do not have an offer from a firm who will pay you to do bar ads (and pay for the course fees) then it is quite an investment.

Regarding whether an LLM will qualify you for practice- are you trained in civil law? If so, I think you might be out of luck. Again, check with the provincial law societies. I am not sure how it works for students from common law jurisdictions. I have a friend who had to go to the US for an LLM in order to qualify to practice even though he studied law in England. The website for the Ontario law society is www.lsuc.on.ca.
Vid- I am not sure when they go out. Hang in there...

Reiko- You really should check the requirements for the province where you intend to practice. All provinces are different but I think that most DO have bar exams. In Ontario, for instance (if practicing in Toronto or capital city Ottawa), you must attend a 4 month bar admission course and write exams at the end of each module. I think they are changing it but that is how it worked in the past. The exams were not nearly as tough as NY bar exams but still something to consider. Also, the bar admissions courses can be costly. If you do not have an offer from a firm who will pay you to do bar ads (and pay for the course fees) then it is quite an investment.

Regarding whether an LLM will qualify you for practice- are you trained in civil law? If so, I think you might be out of luck. Again, check with the provincial law societies. I am not sure how it works for students from common law jurisdictions. I have a friend who had to go to the US for an LLM in order to qualify to practice even though he studied law in England. The website for the Ontario law society is www.lsuc.on.ca.
quote
Reiko
Nina, thank you so much.

Yes, I am trained in civil law country. Anyway, I will go to check that URL what you gave me.
Nina, thank you so much.

Yes, I am trained in civil law country. Anyway, I will go to check that URL what you gave me.
quote
Nina
Whoops- one other thing I forgot to mention. University of Ottawa and maybe McGill in Montreal have one year programs for civil law grads. I think it's called the National Program. If students in Quebec did a civil law degree, they can go for one more year to qualify as a common law grad. I am not sure if students who study civil law in other countries are eligible. You should try the schools. You might be able to do the one year National Program and maybe qualify for practice without an LLM.
Whoops- one other thing I forgot to mention. University of Ottawa and maybe McGill in Montreal have one year programs for civil law grads. I think it's called the National Program. If students in Quebec did a civil law degree, they can go for one more year to qualify as a common law grad. I am not sure if students who study civil law in other countries are eligible. You should try the schools. You might be able to do the one year National Program and maybe qualify for practice without an LLM.
quote
Amnak
As a foreign civil lawyer you can't do a one-year common law conversion at McGill or Ottawa. McGill's program is integrated so civil and common law are taught as one. Ottawa's conversion course is only available to students with Canadian civil or common degrees.

Unlike some U.S. state jurisdictions (i.e. New York), a Canadian LL.M. doesn't qualify you to sit the Bar. I'd suggest applying to the first-year of an LL.B. and then asking for accreditation thereafter.
As a foreign civil lawyer you can't do a one-year common law conversion at McGill or Ottawa. McGill's program is integrated so civil and common law are taught as one. Ottawa's conversion course is only available to students with Canadian civil or common degrees.

Unlike some U.S. state jurisdictions (i.e. New York), a Canadian LL.M. doesn't qualify you to sit the Bar. I'd suggest applying to the first-year of an LL.B. and then asking for accreditation thereafter.
quote
Vid
How does U ofT and Mcgill compare with NU?
How does U ofT and Mcgill compare with NU?
quote
james
Has anyone out there attempted the Canadian committee of accreditation conversion exams? If so were they difficult?

Thanks
Has anyone out there attempted the Canadian committee of accreditation conversion exams? If so were they difficult?

Thanks
quote
Annie
I think this is a pretty fair assessment.
The real drawback to getting an LL.M. in Canada (if you are Canadian) is the bias in academia in favour of big American and European universities. Some think this may be changing, but academic snobbery is deeply rooted. If you want to be a professor in Canada, go elsewhere.

Best international rep = McGill

Best bang for your buck = McGill, UNB

Worst bang for your buck = Dal

Best for job opportunities in Canada = Toronto

Best faculty = Ottawa

Best course offerings = Osgoode

Best MBA/LLB combo = Osgoode

Best internships/extracurricular involvement = Ottawa

Most overrated = Toronto

Most accomplished students = Toronto

Best overall experience = UNB, Dal, UVic

Best international exchanges = Ottawa

Coolest city = McGill, UBC

Best for CLE/LLM = Osgoode

Best for Health = Alberta

Best for Corporate = Toronto

Best for Crim = Queen's

Best for Tech = Ottawa

Best for Marine = Dal

Best for Oil = Calgary

Best for IP = Ottawa

Best for Human Rights = Ottawa

Most mediocre school = Moncton
I think this is a pretty fair assessment.
The real drawback to getting an LL.M. in Canada (if you are Canadian) is the bias in academia in favour of big American and European universities. Some think this may be changing, but academic snobbery is deeply rooted. If you want to be a professor in Canada, go elsewhere.

<blockquote>Best international rep = McGill

Best bang for your buck = McGill, UNB

Worst bang for your buck = Dal

Best for job opportunities in Canada = Toronto

Best faculty = Ottawa

Best course offerings = Osgoode

Best MBA/LLB combo = Osgoode

Best internships/extracurricular involvement = Ottawa

Most overrated = Toronto

Most accomplished students = Toronto

Best overall experience = UNB, Dal, UVic

Best international exchanges = Ottawa

Coolest city = McGill, UBC

Best for CLE/LLM = Osgoode

Best for Health = Alberta

Best for Corporate = Toronto

Best for Crim = Queen's

Best for Tech = Ottawa

Best for Marine = Dal

Best for Oil = Calgary

Best for IP = Ottawa

Best for Human Rights = Ottawa

Most mediocre school = Moncton</blockquote>
quote
Didero
Most mediocre school = Moncton

:-)

Good to know!
<blockquote>Most mediocre school = Moncton</blockquote>
:-)

Good to know!
quote
lukemirac
I am very interested in getting to Law School in Canada. I come from a sub-saharan african country called Cameroon with a billingual culture of French and English like Canada. I hold a law degree(LLB) from the state university of Yaounde,Soa and dying to continue. I am from the English speaking part of my country so my degree was
on English Private Law.
Canada is the place where i would like to continue
my studies or even get into a program worth the while
and competitive. Osgoode and Ottawa seem to have interesting LLM ptograms. Another one is McGill
Law School which seems billingual in character. I have
a perfect mastery of the French language so it can only
do good to me.I need to know admission requirements of all sorts including tuition and scholarships. Methods of
financing my sutdies and work too are very important
to me. I am open for everything Law you could find for
me in CANADA.

I am very interested in getting to Law School in Canada. I come from a sub-saharan african country called Cameroon with a billingual culture of French and English like Canada. I hold a law degree(LLB) from the state university of Yaounde,Soa and dying to continue. I am from the English speaking part of my country so my degree was
on English Private Law.
Canada is the place where i would like to continue
my studies or even get into a program worth the while
and competitive. Osgoode and Ottawa seem to have interesting LLM ptograms. Another one is McGill
Law School which seems billingual in character. I have
a perfect mastery of the French language so it can only
do good to me.I need to know admission requirements of all sorts including tuition and scholarships. Methods of
financing my sutdies and work too are very important
to me. I am open for everything Law you could find for
me in CANADA.
quote
york

I need to know admission requirements of all sorts including tuition and scholarships. Methods of
financing my sutdies and work too are very important
to me.


Didn't you find this on the university websites? Most unis do have all necessary information on their website. Sometimes you need to look around a bit, though.
<blockquote>
I need to know admission requirements of all sorts including tuition and scholarships. Methods of
financing my sutdies and work too are very important
to me.</blockquote>

Didn't you find this on the university websites? Most unis do have all necessary information on their website. Sometimes you need to look around a bit, though.
quote
MT
The uOttawa is centered on the bilingualism. I am definitely enjoying my experience, here. If you have interest for law & technology, then, it is the place to be in Canada.

See my other post in: http://www.llm-guide.com/board/7040

Marcelo
The uOttawa is centered on the bilingualism. I am definitely enjoying my experience, here. If you have interest for law & technology, then, it is the place to be in Canada.

See my other post in: http://www.llm-guide.com/board/7040

Marcelo
quote
UWO has the best exchange opportunities. More than any other school in North America,
UWO has the best exchange opportunities. More than any other school in North America,
quote
Hi to All,
I have seen the posts are actually way old but its worth a try....I am an asian and would like to study law in Canada . I am currently in UAE, can you please suggest a good Law school in canada that accepts students from foreign countries.

Thank you
Hi to All,
I have seen the posts are actually way old but its worth a try....I am an asian and would like to study law in Canada . I am currently in UAE, can you please suggest a good Law school in canada that accepts students from foreign countries.

Thank you
quote
atqueiroz
Hello moon river. Try www.law.utoronto.ca. I did the LLM there 05-06 and it was great. There were about 50% canadians and the other half were international students from all over the world. It is one of the best in Canada, together with McGill. Cheers!
Hello moon river. Try www.law.utoronto.ca. I did the LLM there 05-06 and it was great. There were about 50% canadians and the other half were international students from all over the world. It is one of the best in Canada, together with McGill. Cheers!
quote
Hi to All,
I have seen the posts are actually way old but its worth a try....I am an asian and would like to study law in Canada . I am currently in UAE, can you please suggest a good Law school in canada that accepts students from foreign countries.

Thank you


Hello,
Have you received any update respond on your quires, Just Curious? Intended for Moon river.

Regards
<blockquote>Hi to All,
I have seen the posts are actually way old but its worth a try....I am an asian and would like to study law in Canada . I am currently in UAE, can you please suggest a good Law school in canada that accepts students from foreign countries.

Thank you</blockquote>

Hello,
Have you received any update respond on your quires, Just Curious? Intended for Moon river.

Regards

quote
Eurobest-

"but at they same time they realize they would be nothing without the US. Canada depends on the US economically, militarily, culturally...you name it:)

The reasons Canada is beholden to the USA economically are because we have the laziest elites in the world who prefer to sell our natural resources wholesale rather than get any value-added to our economy. They also cant be bother developing other markets and entered into the corporatist sell out agreement of NAFTA.

Culturally, this is obviously nonsense. Canada has a distinctive core culture, although many countries are recipients of American pop culture, France, UK, Germany, Australia, Japan, etc and Canada. We are not "dependent" on the USA for culture. We are the only nation in which,albeit strained at times, the two major European cultures have lived together in the same nation for over a century.

If we had leaders worth their weight in salt we could fix our economic problems and build our own military. Although, Canada is not a militaristic war-mongering nation.
Eurobest-

"but at they same time they realize they would be nothing without the US. Canada depends on the US economically, militarily, culturally...you name it:)

The reasons Canada is beholden to the USA economically are because we have the laziest elites in the world who prefer to sell our natural resources wholesale rather than get any value-added to our economy. They also cant be bother developing other markets and entered into the corporatist sell out agreement of NAFTA.

Culturally, this is obviously nonsense. Canada has a distinctive core culture, although many countries are recipients of American pop culture, France, UK, Germany, Australia, Japan, etc and Canada. We are not "dependent" on the USA for culture. We are the only nation in which,albeit strained at times, the two major European cultures have lived together in the same nation for over a century.

If we had leaders worth their weight in salt we could fix our economic problems and build our own military. Although, Canada is not a militaristic war-mongering nation.
quote
To-Atqueiroz
Hi...I am an Indian, too applying for LLM coursework progm. in University of Toronto and I am little bit nonplussed about the outcome of this degree(LLM) progm. after completing. I wish to apply for international business law or corporate financing law and as u are a pass out form that very university so could you please help me regarding the positive future aspects regarding this course(like jobs in firms?)
And one more favor can you please let me know about the legal writing sample or article which is to be submitted to them along with the supporting documents(like page limit and can it be on any topic or it should be related to ypur course for which you r applying?)
Thank you and hoping for a early positive reply from your side
To-Atqueiroz
Hi...I am an Indian, too applying for LLM coursework progm. in University of Toronto and I am little bit nonplussed about the outcome of this degree(LLM) progm. after completing. I wish to apply for international business law or corporate financing law and as u are a pass out form that very university so could you please help me regarding the positive future aspects regarding this course(like jobs in firms?)
And one more favor can you please let me know about the legal writing sample or article which is to be submitted to them along with the supporting documents(like page limit and can it be on any topic or it should be related to ypur course for which you r applying?)
Thank you and hoping for a early positive reply from your side
quote

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