Syd/ANU/Bond?


cdh86
Hello!

I am submitting applications to LLB/JD programs in Australia, with the hopes of starting in 2008. I am curious as to the reputation of ANU, USyd, and Bond for their law programs. The cost for the programs is essentially the same (as I will be an international student), with Bond's being completed sooner.

I would be ideally looking to stay in Australia afterwards.

Any thoughts anyone has on any of the institutions would be greatly appreciated!
Hello!

I am submitting applications to LLB/JD programs in Australia, with the hopes of starting in 2008. I am curious as to the reputation of ANU, USyd, and Bond for their law programs. The cost for the programs is essentially the same (as I will be an international student), with Bond's being completed sooner.

I would be ideally looking to stay in Australia afterwards.

Any thoughts anyone has on any of the institutions would be greatly appreciated!

quote
Gregor2009
Hi,

Not sure if my post is a little too late but you might want to have a look at ANU's JD Program. It is launched last month and will have its first intake in 2008.

If you are accepted into that, it would probably be the best option among the three you have listed.

Regards
Greg
Hi,

Not sure if my post is a little too late but you might want to have a look at ANU's JD Program. It is launched last month and will have its first intake in 2008.

If you are accepted into that, it would probably be the best option among the three you have listed.

Regards
Greg
quote
Hi cdh86,

I think my reply might also be a tad late, but nevertheless...I can only give my opinion on the perception of Australians of the three universities (being Australian myself, and a Bond LLB student at that) and would be interested to hear how they are regarded internationally.

ANU is typically regarded as a very theoretical university with an excellent research basis and a strong international law focus. So, if you want a research degree or an LLM in Int Law then there is no better place in Aus (except you will have to deal with living in Canberra). It also is more widely known internationally than USyd, I would expect.

Sydney is highly regarded all round, especially in fields like corporate law, although it is burdened by a huge number of students (I don't know if this is true for the LLM classes) and thus funding is an issue.

From personal experience, Bond is an excellent university - it is the cheapest in terms of living expenses, has a wonderful campus life and so on. The classes are smaller and more personal than most, although the professors (with some exceptions) aren't to the standard of ANU/USyd. The Bond Law Faculty is renowned for practical training (esp JD) and mediation/arbitration, although unfortunately research is not emphasised too much. However, I know a plethora of JD and LLM students who are very happy with their education there. I can guarantee it will not be as competitive as ANU or Syd, for better or worse.

You might also want to look at the new JD program being set up by the University of Melbourne, which is usually ranked higher than Sydney on the ranking schemes (for what they're worth)

Looks like the LLB is a dying breed in Australia...
Hi cdh86,

I think my reply might also be a tad late, but nevertheless...I can only give my opinion on the perception of Australians of the three universities (being Australian myself, and a Bond LLB student at that) and would be interested to hear how they are regarded internationally.

ANU is typically regarded as a very theoretical university with an excellent research basis and a strong international law focus. So, if you want a research degree or an LLM in Int Law then there is no better place in Aus (except you will have to deal with living in Canberra). It also is more widely known internationally than USyd, I would expect.

Sydney is highly regarded all round, especially in fields like corporate law, although it is burdened by a huge number of students (I don't know if this is true for the LLM classes) and thus funding is an issue.

From personal experience, Bond is an excellent university - it is the cheapest in terms of living expenses, has a wonderful campus life and so on. The classes are smaller and more personal than most, although the professors (with some exceptions) aren't to the standard of ANU/USyd. The Bond Law Faculty is renowned for practical training (esp JD) and mediation/arbitration, although unfortunately research is not emphasised too much. However, I know a plethora of JD and LLM students who are very happy with their education there. I can guarantee it will not be as competitive as ANU or Syd, for better or worse.

You might also want to look at the new JD program being set up by the University of Melbourne, which is usually ranked higher than Sydney on the ranking schemes (for what they're worth)

Looks like the LLB is a dying breed in Australia...
quote
Sorry.
May I know something about BJuris offered by Bond?
Can I hold this degree to apply for LL.M?
Sorry.
May I know something about BJuris offered by Bond?
Can I hold this degree to apply for LL.M?
quote
Hey Louistheidol

There's not too much to say about the BJuris at Bond really. It keeps the advantage of being on an accellerated program (it will only take you two years, rather than three). However, the BJuris is typically a more theoretical degree and Bond is a very practice-focussed university - therefore it does not play to Bond's strengths. Nor does it allow you to practice. I met only one or two people following the BJuris program in my 4 years at Bond.

That being said, a BJuris at Bond would probably get you into Bond's LL.M program - it may not cut it for more prestigeous LL.Ms with higher entry requirements.

Why not just do an LL.B? It's not as flexible, but much more useful (unless you're planning to become an academic, in which case I suggest a university with a more theoretical focus - UQ, ANU, USyd, UniMelb etc)
Hey Louistheidol

There's not too much to say about the BJuris at Bond really. It keeps the advantage of being on an accellerated program (it will only take you two years, rather than three). However, the BJuris is typically a more theoretical degree and Bond is a very practice-focussed university - therefore it does not play to Bond's strengths. Nor does it allow you to practice. I met only one or two people following the BJuris program in my 4 years at Bond.

That being said, a BJuris at Bond would probably get you into Bond's LL.M program - it may not cut it for more prestigeous LL.Ms with higher entry requirements.

Why not just do an LL.B? It's not as flexible, but much more useful (unless you're planning to become an academic, in which case I suggest a university with a more theoretical focus - UQ, ANU, USyd, UniMelb etc)
quote
Thanks, me_incarnate.

I'm just wondering.
I'm not interested in practising but teaching.
That's why I wanna find the answer.
Is it possible that a BJuris holder apply for a LL.M degree by US law school?

May I have your contact information?
I have decided to study at Bond next year.
Thanks, me_incarnate.

I'm just wondering.
I'm not interested in practising but teaching.
That's why I wanna find the answer.
Is it possible that a BJuris holder apply for a LL.M degree by US law school?

May I have your contact information?
I have decided to study at Bond next year.
quote
I see I see. In that case, the B.Juris is probably quite appropriate.

I'm really not an expert in the B.Juris program, but I assume it would get you in to some LL.M programs - maybe not the most prestigeous US universities, unless you get killer grades. I come to this conclusion because I think LLMs are designed for people who are legally trained to a practising level.

It would, however, get you into MJur programs which are offered by some of the more sandstone universities around the world - see for example the Oxford website: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/postgraduate/caz/law.shtml

My email address is stephendietz@msn.com if you want to get in touch. it's fantastic that you're coming to Bond, it is a wonderful uni and I had a great time there.
I see I see. In that case, the B.Juris is probably quite appropriate.

I'm really not an expert in the B.Juris program, but I assume it would get you in to some LL.M programs - maybe not the most prestigeous US universities, unless you get killer grades. I come to this conclusion because I think LLMs are designed for people who are legally trained to a practising level.

It would, however, get you into MJur programs which are offered by some of the more sandstone universities around the world - see for example the Oxford website: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/postgraduate/caz/law.shtml

My email address is stephendietz@msn.com if you want to get in touch. it's fantastic that you're coming to Bond, it is a wonderful uni and I had a great time there.
quote
Mr Easter
Dear whoever

Bond is a second rate law school.

In Aus, the best are UMel/USyd/UNSW then---- Monash/UQ/UAde/UWA. ANU is good, professors are great, but students are not of the same calibre as other top ones.

The demand for ANU LLB is just not as high as UNSW/USyd/UMelb.... statistics don't lie.

LLB not JD, will remain Aus legal degree. US only changed to JDs because all states decide that law will be studied postgraduate. In Aus, law is undergraduate accessible, so the JD is just a fancy name for shit law schools to attract students. UMel only did this because they changed their entire university academic struture to that of a US university, with law only accessible post grad.

Unless all Aus states change their rule, LLB will be the terminal law degree. Fuck the JD.
Dear whoever

Bond is a second rate law school.

In Aus, the best are UMel/USyd/UNSW then---- Monash/UQ/UAde/UWA. ANU is good, professors are great, but students are not of the same calibre as other top ones.

The demand for ANU LLB is just not as high as UNSW/USyd/UMelb.... statistics don't lie.

LLB not JD, will remain Aus legal degree. US only changed to JDs because all states decide that law will be studied postgraduate. In Aus, law is undergraduate accessible, so the JD is just a fancy name for shit law schools to attract students. UMel only did this because they changed their entire university academic struture to that of a US university, with law only accessible post grad.

Unless all Aus states change their rule, LLB will be the terminal law degree. Fuck the JD.
quote
Dear Mr Easter,

I tend to think that your opinion re: Bond is shared by quite a few.

I agree that the Bond LLB can't compete with the big guns on reputation - I'm labouring under that at the moment. I have not attended law school anywhere else (except for Sweden) so I cannot compare it to others but I certainly had a good time and learned a lot. As with all unis, the high achievers found places with top tiers, the low achievers with mid-size and boutique; in that, Bond is no different from anywhere else.

I think the ANU LLB would be highly regarded in certain spheres, but cannot boast the the universal cred of USyd or UMelb, that is true. I would tend to put UNSW in the second category, but perhaps that's a personal bias.

As for JD v LLB, who knows? Perhaps graduate entry LLBs will be done away with and the LLB and JD will live peacefully side-by-side, such as in the ANU and Bond systems. I see a trend towards JD, but I don't know where it will end up!!

Stephen
Dear Mr Easter,

I tend to think that your opinion re: Bond is shared by quite a few.

I agree that the Bond LLB can't compete with the big guns on reputation - I'm labouring under that at the moment. I have not attended law school anywhere else (except for Sweden) so I cannot compare it to others but I certainly had a good time and learned a lot. As with all unis, the high achievers found places with top tiers, the low achievers with mid-size and boutique; in that, Bond is no different from anywhere else.

I think the ANU LLB would be highly regarded in certain spheres, but cannot boast the the universal cred of USyd or UMelb, that is true. I would tend to put UNSW in the second category, but perhaps that's a personal bias.

As for JD v LLB, who knows? Perhaps graduate entry LLBs will be done away with and the LLB and JD will live peacefully side-by-side, such as in the ANU and Bond systems. I see a trend towards JD, but I don't know where it will end up!!

Stephen
quote
Pharrell
In my opinion
1. Sydney Univ.
2. ANU
3. Bond
In my opinion
1. Sydney Univ.
2. ANU
3. Bond
quote
roziqin
Hi guys, I am Indonesian. I want to pursue my LLM in ANU, considering to take specialization on Government & Commercial Law. Any one have information about that?

If I want to apply ADS, which campus do you suggest, and why? I have read information from the website, but still confuse about that.

Cheers
Hi guys, I am Indonesian. I want to pursue my LLM in ANU, considering to take specialization on Government & Commercial Law. Any one have information about that?

If I want to apply ADS, which campus do you suggest, and why? I have read information from the website, but still confuse about that.

Cheers
quote
Gregor2009
Hi Roziqin,

I am not sure what is 'ADS' so I can't comment on that.

My LLM is from ANU so I would highly recommend that you considering attending the university. The Government & Commecial Law specialisation is also what the law school is renowned for. In general, the administrative staff are also helpful and the academic standards are rigorous.

However, the downside is that the lifestyle in Canberra is totally different from that in Melbourne, Sydney or Brisbane - i.e. it is not as busy.


Cheers,
Greg
Hi Roziqin,

I am not sure what is 'ADS' so I can't comment on that.

My LLM is from ANU so I would highly recommend that you considering attending the university. The Government & Commecial Law specialisation is also what the law school is renowned for. In general, the administrative staff are also helpful and the academic standards are rigorous.

However, the downside is that the lifestyle in Canberra is totally different from that in Melbourne, Sydney or Brisbane - i.e. it is not as busy.


Cheers,
Greg
quote
roziqin
Hi, I am happy after knew that you're graduated from ANU. May be you can share your experience to me

Cheers,
Roziqin
Hi, I am happy after knew that you're graduated from ANU. May be you can share your experience to me

Cheers,
Roziqin
quote

Reply to Post

Related Law Schools

Sydney, Australia 157 Followers 107 Discussions
Canberra, Australia 30 Followers 43 Discussions
Robina, Australia 31 Followers 15 Discussions