Ranking of LLM for International business law in south america?


tez
Thanks for the quick reply. Can you tell me, does an especializacion no really have an equivalent in American law program? I haven't been able to find one. I don't have an LLB, which is what I think your abogacia is, no? The undergraduate law degree? I have been approved to study, however. Do you think this Especializacion will be like having a law degree as given in the US?

I've been searching what UBA graduates do in the US and they are all over the place, many are professors in US universities, so I know that a UBA degree is accepted, but I'm wondering if all are accepted equally. Do you understand what I am saying? I feel like I am being unclear.

Thanks in advance, Tez.
Thanks for the quick reply. Can you tell me, does an especializacion no really have an equivalent in American law program? I haven't been able to find one. I don't have an LLB, which is what I think your abogacia is, no? The undergraduate law degree? I have been approved to study, however. Do you think this Especializacion will be like having a law degree as given in the US?

I've been searching what UBA graduates do in the US and they are all over the place, many are professors in US universities, so I know that a UBA degree is accepted, but I'm wondering if all are accepted equally. Do you understand what I am saying? I feel like I am being unclear.

Thanks in advance, Tez.
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Hey tez, you are not unclear, I understand which is your concern. Unfortunately what you are asking me is something I am not able to answer you. That is something you should check with US universities. If I were you, before doing the especialización, I would send the syllabus to some US universities, explaining the different degrees (J.D., LL.M, Ph.D) that there are in Argentina, in order to see if the especialización is enough for an aquivalence...
Hey tez, you are not unclear, I understand which is your concern. Unfortunately what you are asking me is something I am not able to answer you. That is something you should check with US universities. If I were you, before doing the especialización, I would send the syllabus to some US universities, explaining the different degrees (J.D., LL.M, Ph.D) that there are in Argentina, in order to see if the especialización is enough for an aquivalence...
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bernese
tez: i have no specific knowledge about the argentine system, but know quite a bit about qualifying in canada, us, and uk. it sounds very unlikely that you would be able to practice law in any of those jurisdictions w the degree you are describing.
tez: i have no specific knowledge about the argentine system, but know quite a bit about qualifying in canada, us, and uk. it sounds very unlikely that you would be able to practice law in any of those jurisdictions w the degree you are describing.
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fajats
In case anybody here is interested in taking an LLM in Mexico, I strongly recomend the ITAM (Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México) or the prestigious UNAM (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México).

In Mexico, you take the Licenciatura en Derecho (which is your undergrad and JD, because it takes around 4.5-5 years) and then the Maestría (LLM)

Also the Universidad Iberoamericana is good for a LLM in Human Rights.

Cheers

p.s. I heard that Torcuato di Telle in Argentina is one of the bests for LLMS in that country.
In case anybody here is interested in taking an LLM in Mexico, I strongly recomend the ITAM (Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México) or the prestigious UNAM (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México).

In Mexico, you take the Licenciatura en Derecho (which is your undergrad and JD, because it takes around 4.5-5 years) and then the Maestría (LLM)

Also the Universidad Iberoamericana is good for a LLM in Human Rights.

Cheers

p.s. I heard that Torcuato di Telle in Argentina is one of the bests for LLMS in that country.
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barmenator
Hi. If I can be of help an Especialidad/Especialización in Latin American academic systems equals to a major or a minor at the bachelor's degree level (undergraduate).

However, I am not certain you would be able to carry out such program, without enrolling for the comprehensive undergraduate law degree. I would ask admissions office in an email.

If your question regarded the subject matter of such program, it's in Natural Resources. Are you sure it is from a Legal prespective? It doesn't state so in its name.

Regards from Mexico!
Hi. If I can be of help an Especialidad/Especialización in Latin American academic systems equals to a major or a minor at the bachelor's degree level (undergraduate).

However, I am not certain you would be able to carry out such program, without enrolling for the comprehensive undergraduate law degree. I would ask admissions office in an email.

If your question regarded the subject matter of such program, it's in Natural Resources. Are you sure it is from a Legal prespective? It doesn't state so in its name.

Regards from Mexico!
quote
rgcolares
Hello guys. Good discussion.

First, with regard to the Argentinian degree, I would say the especialización would not qualify you for a J.D. degree in the US. In the US, you should first take an undergraduate degree before pursuing a J.D. degree. The J.D. only lasts 3 years.

In other countries, such as Brazil, Argentina, Spain and even the United Kingdom, there's no previous undergraduate requirement and the law degree takes 4 or 5 years, depending on the jurisdiction.

Even if you go for a Law Degree in Argentina, it is very unlikely to qualify you for an American J.D. degree upon homologation and you will probably be required to take the J.D. again in the US if you want to practice law, but it might depend on the law of each American State where you want to qualify.

If you pursue a carrer in academy, it might be possible for one to teach law in other country if such person holds high reputation and recognised studies, but it does not mean to qualify as a lawyer. I have a friend who took his Law degree in Brazil, LLM in Canada, PhD in Social Sciences/Law in the UK and now teaches in Hong Kong, but this does qualify him to practice law there.

I have Law degrees both in Brazil and Spain, an MBA in Brazil and an LLM in the UK, 9 years of practice in law, but none of these degrees or experience qualify me to practice law in the US.

As far as the "especialización" is concerned, it does not really have a direct correspondent in the US educational system, but it could be compared to the UK's Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) and is quite similar to the American LL.M.
Hello guys. Good discussion.

First, with regard to the Argentinian degree, I would say the especialización would not qualify you for a J.D. degree in the US. In the US, you should first take an undergraduate degree before pursuing a J.D. degree. The J.D. only lasts 3 years.

In other countries, such as Brazil, Argentina, Spain and even the United Kingdom, there's no previous undergraduate requirement and the law degree takes 4 or 5 years, depending on the jurisdiction.

Even if you go for a Law Degree in Argentina, it is very unlikely to qualify you for an American J.D. degree upon homologation and you will probably be required to take the J.D. again in the US if you want to practice law, but it might depend on the law of each American State where you want to qualify.

If you pursue a carrer in academy, it might be possible for one to teach law in other country if such person holds high reputation and recognised studies, but it does not mean to qualify as a lawyer. I have a friend who took his Law degree in Brazil, LLM in Canada, PhD in Social Sciences/Law in the UK and now teaches in Hong Kong, but this does qualify him to practice law there.

I have Law degrees both in Brazil and Spain, an MBA in Brazil and an LLM in the UK, 9 years of practice in law, but none of these degrees or experience qualify me to practice law in the US.

As far as the "especialización" is concerned, it does not really have a direct correspondent in the US educational system, but it could be compared to the UK's Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) and is quite similar to the American LL.M.
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Linck
After years reviewing this website and reading these comments, I am still surprised on the fact that Mexico has not been mentioned. Is not a South American country but is still has some well known Law Schools in Latin America, like the Escuela de Graduados de Administracion Publica y Politica Publica (EGAP) of the Instituto Tecnologico de Monterrey (ITESM); such institution offers an outstanding LLM program in International Business Law.
After years reviewing this website and reading these comments, I am still surprised on the fact that Mexico has not been mentioned. Is not a South American country but is still has some well known Law Schools in Latin America, like the Escuela de Graduados de Administracion Publica y Politica Publica (EGAP) of the Instituto Tecnologico de Monterrey (ITESM); such institution offers an outstanding LLM program in International Business Law.
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Alain
What's the link (web address) to these programs?
Thanks
What's the link (web address) to these programs?
Thanks
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Linck
Here is the website containing information in English on the Master in International Law at the EGAP/ITESM in Monterrey:

http://www.itesm.edu/wps/portal/egap?WCM_GLOBAL_CONTEXT=/migration/EGAP2/English+version/Graduate+Programs/International+Law
Here is the website containing information in English on the Master in International Law at the EGAP/ITESM in Monterrey:

http://www.itesm.edu/wps/portal/egap?WCM_GLOBAL_CONTEXT=/migration/EGAP2/English+version/Graduate+Programs/International+Law
quote

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