Ranking of LLM for International business law in south america?


fabien_fr
Hi there, i'm preparing a one year LLM in south America and for the reason I am looking for ranking informations about Universities and LLM in the International Business law fied in South America.
I've heard about the one in Heidelberg Santiago de Chile, and another one in the UBA of Buenos Aires?
Does anyone got more information about it?

Thank you by advance

Fabien
Master in Law of the Media (5th year)
University of Toulouse (France)
Hi there, i'm preparing a one year LLM in south America and for the reason I am looking for ranking informations about Universities and LLM in the International Business law fied in South America.
I've heard about the one in Heidelberg Santiago de Chile, and another one in the UBA of Buenos Aires?
Does anyone got more information about it?

Thank you by advance

Fabien
Master in Law of the Media (5th year)
University of Toulouse (France)
quote
Mr. Lawyer
Do you speak spanish or portuguese?

In which area are u looking for?

see ya
Do you speak spanish or portuguese?

In which area are u looking for?

see ya
quote
fabien_fr
Hello Mr. Lawyer, thanks for your quick answer
I speak spanish !

and I'm looking for a LLM in International Business Law, or International law for Investments. In fact, a LLM that mix law and economy at the international ladder.

fabien
Hello Mr. Lawyer, thanks for your quick answer
I speak spanish !

and I'm looking for a LLM in International Business Law, or International law for Investments. In fact, a LLM that mix law and economy at the international ladder.

fabien
quote
Becarefull, there no exists one year LLMs in Argentina. At least, in the field you are looking for.
Becarefull, there no exists one year LLMs in Argentina. At least, in the field you are looking for.
quote
Well,

That's true!!

In South America, the Master courses follow a more conservative track. Very often it takes at least two years, there is a mandatory admission process (a very though one in the top unis), and you will have to write and sustain a thesis.

Apart from that, there is some specializations (not LLMs) in many areas that follows a more standard 1 year course, but it is not a degree.

I know a very good LL.M in Capital Markets in the IBMEC (Instituto Brasileiro de Mercado de Capitais) in Sao Paulo, that combines both Law and Business. It is a one year program, very good professors and only practitioners as students. The discussions in class, therefore, might be good...

However, it is a bit expensive (around 8.000 Euros) and taught in Portuguese! A mistake as far as i concern, because they could have done it in English.

In any case... good luck!

Ciao
Well,

That's true!!

In South America, the Master courses follow a more conservative track. Very often it takes at least two years, there is a mandatory admission process (a very though one in the top unis), and you will have to write and sustain a thesis.

Apart from that, there is some specializations (not LLMs) in many areas that follows a more standard 1 year course, but it is not a degree.

I know a very good LL.M in Capital Markets in the IBMEC (Instituto Brasileiro de Mercado de Capitais) in Sao Paulo, that combines both Law and Business. It is a one year program, very good professors and only practitioners as students. The discussions in class, therefore, might be good...

However, it is a bit expensive (around 8.000 Euros) and taught in Portuguese! A mistake as far as i concern, because they could have done it in English.

In any case... good luck!

Ciao
quote
Hello:

I have completed two years' of Spanish and have a strong desire to improve. Is there a way I could attend a specialization course (or any other LLM or MBA) taught in English? This would enable me to learn Spanish, also. Or do you have any other ideas of how I might spend a year or so in Latin America or Spain?

Also, I have been looking at the masters' in EU law at Carlos III in Spain. Any ideas about that?
Hello:

I have completed two years' of Spanish and have a strong desire to improve. Is there a way I could attend a specialization course (or any other LLM or MBA) taught in English? This would enable me to learn Spanish, also. Or do you have any other ideas of how I might spend a year or so in Latin America or Spain?

Also, I have been looking at the masters' in EU law at Carlos III in Spain. Any ideas about that?
quote
pnarg
Hello Mr. Lawyer, thanks for your quick answer
I speak spanish !

and I'm looking for a LLM in International Business Law, or International law for Investments. In fact, a LLM that mix law and economy at the international ladder.

fabien


see the LLM in law and economics with a specilization in finance law at the UTDT www.utdt.edu
<blockquote>Hello Mr. Lawyer, thanks for your quick answer
I speak spanish !

and I'm looking for a LLM in International Business Law, or International law for Investments. In fact, a LLM that mix law and economy at the international ladder.

fabien</blockquote>

see the LLM in law and economics with a specilization in finance law at the UTDT www.utdt.edu
quote
Rej
I've got a friend from Argentina who did that LL.M. You can do it in one year if you want (in a full-time basis). It is an excellent LLM program and the UTDT (Universidad Torcuato Di Tella) is, now-a-days, one of, if not, the best Law School in Argentina. You can ever take one semester abroad (i.e. Northwester).
I've got a friend from Argentina who did that LL.M. You can do it in one year if you want (in a full-time basis). It is an excellent LLM program and the UTDT (Universidad Torcuato Di Tella) is, now-a-days, one of, if not, the best Law School in Argentina. You can ever take one semester abroad (i.e. Northwester).
quote
Herny
I am currently taking the Maestria en Derecho y Economia (MDE) at UTDT. I took the 2 year masters since i was working when i started. Right now I am studying at Northwestern School of Law as an exchange student (due to the agreement between UTDT and Northwestern). In the MDE you are going to study a lot of economics, finance, antitrust, regulation, and most of the courses are given from the law & economics perspective. You can make the MDE in one year, but it is really hard. The MDE also offers the possibility of taking course of other masters, suchs MBA courses, or the Master in Finance courses.
I hope you found this information useful.
Regards,
Herny
I am currently taking the Maestria en Derecho y Economia (MDE) at UTDT. I took the 2 year masters since i was working when i started. Right now I am studying at Northwestern School of Law as an exchange student (due to the agreement between UTDT and Northwestern). In the MDE you are going to study a lot of economics, finance, antitrust, regulation, and most of the courses are given from the law & economics perspective. You can make the MDE in one year, but it is really hard. The MDE also offers the possibility of taking course of other masters, suchs MBA courses, or the Master in Finance courses.
I hope you found this information useful.
Regards,
Herny
quote
I've got a friend from Argentina who did that LL.M. You can do it in one year if you want (in a full-time basis). It is an excellent LLM program and the UTDT (Universidad Torcuato Di Tella) is, now-a-days, one of, if not, the best Law School in Argentina. You can ever take one semester abroad (i.e. Northwester).


Well... in fact UTDT is a good university if we talk about postrgaduate degrees (even more if we talk about economic degrees), but for sure, it is not the best law school in Argentina nor it is neer to be it. In law, and always talking about postgraduate degrees, the best ones are UA (Universidad Austral) and UCA (Universidad Católica Argentina).
<blockquote>I've got a friend from Argentina who did that LL.M. You can do it in one year if you want (in a full-time basis). It is an excellent LLM program and the UTDT (Universidad Torcuato Di Tella) is, now-a-days, one of, if not, the best Law School in Argentina. You can ever take one semester abroad (i.e. Northwester).</blockquote>

Well... in fact UTDT is a good university if we talk about postrgaduate degrees (even more if we talk about economic degrees), but for sure, it is not the best law school in Argentina nor it is neer to be it. In law, and always talking about postgraduate degrees, the best ones are UA (Universidad Austral) and UCA (Universidad Católica Argentina).
quote
Rej
I also happen to have very good friends who had studied in the Universidad Católica Argenitna (UCA) and in the Universidad Austral (UA).
The UCA might have been a very good university 15 years ago... Now you simply cannot compare the Universidad Torcuato di Tella (UTDT) and the UCA. They are just in different leagues. Just check the faculty in each Law School (both full time and part time professors, though I am not sure the UCA has full time professors).
Regarding the UA it is definitely a very good Law School but, according to friends of mine who have taken courses in both Law Schools, the UTDT allows you to better develop your reasoning skills as, unlike the UA, is not a Catholic insitution where you only see Saint Thomas' reasoning...
Another top Law School, jointly with the UTDT is the Law School from the Universidad de San Andrés that is starting with a J.D. Degree soon...
I also happen to have very good friends who had studied in the Universidad Católica Argenitna (UCA) and in the Universidad Austral (UA).
The UCA might have been a very good university 15 years ago... Now you simply cannot compare the Universidad Torcuato di Tella (UTDT) and the UCA. They are just in different leagues. Just check the faculty in each Law School (both full time and part time professors, though I am not sure the UCA has full time professors).
Regarding the UA it is definitely a very good Law School but, according to friends of mine who have taken courses in both Law Schools, the UTDT allows you to better develop your reasoning skills as, unlike the UA, is not a Catholic insitution where you only see Saint Thomas' reasoning...
Another top Law School, jointly with the UTDT is the Law School from the Universidad de San Andrés that is starting with a J.D. Degree soon...
quote
Well it is something strange and contradictory what you have said

First of all, it seems that you are confusing the degree career with the postgraduate career. If you were talking about LLMs (the topic of these posts) I do not know, for example, when your friends studied the LLM in Economic Business Law from UCA because 15 years ago that program did not exist. If you were talking about the degree career, your conclusions are also strange because it is only necessary to see what professionals are hired by Argentine law firm all of them are from the University of Buenos Aires (UBA) and the Catholic University of Argentina (UCA), just a few of them from the Austral University (UA), and practically there are not UTDT lawyers hired

Second, in connection with professors, your have also mixed up. UCA and UA have both part time and full time professors. On the other hand, you only have to make a simple comparison have a look to UCA, UA and UTDT professors well known professors are in UCA an UA!

Third, your "friends" are a little bit peculiar saying that UA do not develop your reasoning skills because it is a Catholic university is such as stupid as saying that UTDT do not develop your reasoning skills because it is a Jewish university! That stupid arguments are from other time! And I repeat the same I said above: just simply analyse what professionals are hired at law firms UTDT lawyers, who your friends said they develop reasoning skills, are conspicuous by their absence in law firms... so, or they do not devolop their reasoning skills in a good way or your "friends" are just simply lying!
Well… it is something strange and contradictory what you have said…

First of all, it seems that you are confusing the degree career with the postgraduate career. If you were talking about LLMs (the topic of these posts) I do not know, for example, when your friends studied the LLM in Economic Business Law from UCA because 15 years ago that program did not exist. If you were talking about the degree career, your conclusions are also strange because it is only necessary to see what professionals are hired by Argentine law firm… all of them are from the University of Buenos Aires (UBA) and the Catholic University of Argentina (UCA), just a few of them from the Austral University (UA), and practically there are not UTDT lawyers hired…

Second, in connection with professors, your have also mixed up. UCA and UA have both part time and full time professors. On the other hand, you only have to make a simple comparison… have a look to UCA, UA and UTDT professors… well known professors are in UCA an UA!

Third, your "friends" are a little bit peculiar… saying that UA do not develop your reasoning skills because it is a Catholic university is such as stupid as saying that UTDT do not develop your reasoning skills because it is a Jewish university! That stupid arguments are from other time! And I repeat the same I said above: just simply analyse what professionals are hired at law firms… UTDT lawyers, who your friends said they develop reasoning skills, are conspicuous by their absence in law firms... so, or they do not devolop their reasoning skills in a good way or your "friends" are just simply lying!
quote
Rej
I am having a lot of fun here! You are right regarding the first issue, we should be speaking about LL.M.s here.

Regarding your points it would be good to take into account that 100% of UTDT's Law School graduates secure a job after graduation. It is true that there are not as many lawyers working in law firms from the UTDT as they are from the UCA, UBA, etc. but this is not a good argument due to two factors:
(i) The UTDT Law School's first class graduated in 2000, so there aren't as many graduates as they are from the other Law Schools; and (ii) The UTDT Law School is a far smaller Law School than those from the UCA and UBA. The first 5 classes didn't reach 25 graduates while now that number is more like 40, but still waaaaay below UCA's and UBA's numbers...

Regarding the issue about professors. Full time professors from the UTDT are recognized and invited to teach in foreign universities (take Roberto Gargarella and Fernando Tesón just as two examples). As for part time professors I do believe that Mairal, Kelly, Manovil, Vinuesa, Teijeiro, Sancinetti, Negri, Marzorati, Lozano, etc. are among the best professionals in their areas of practice and they actually go to teach not as in the UBA where usually only the assistant professors attent... Apart from the aforesaid law professors in the UTDT are paid better than in UCA and UBA so, even though that is not determinant, it is something to be taken into account.

Third point, the UA is a Catholic university owned by the Opus Dei (nothing against the Opus Judei though but is true). The UTDT, even though it has a number of jewish students is not religiously oriented...

Just my (or mi friend's) point of view but if I were you I'd rather make some research in all the big law firms in Buenos Aires and you will find UTDT lawyers working there, not many because of the small and selective application process though.
I am having a lot of fun here! You are right regarding the first issue, we should be speaking about LL.M.s here.

Regarding your points it would be good to take into account that 100% of UTDT's Law School graduates secure a job after graduation. It is true that there are not as many lawyers working in law firms from the UTDT as they are from the UCA, UBA, etc. but this is not a good argument due to two factors:
(i) The UTDT Law School's first class graduated in 2000, so there aren't as many graduates as they are from the other Law Schools; and (ii) The UTDT Law School is a far smaller Law School than those from the UCA and UBA. The first 5 classes didn't reach 25 graduates while now that number is more like 40, but still waaaaay below UCA's and UBA's numbers...

Regarding the issue about professors. Full time professors from the UTDT are recognized and invited to teach in foreign universities (take Roberto Gargarella and Fernando Tesón just as two examples). As for part time professors I do believe that Mairal, Kelly, Manovil, Vinuesa, Teijeiro, Sancinetti, Negri, Marzorati, Lozano, etc. are among the best professionals in their areas of practice and they actually go to teach not as in the UBA where usually only the assistant professors attent... Apart from the aforesaid law professors in the UTDT are paid better than in UCA and UBA so, even though that is not determinant, it is something to be taken into account.

Third point, the UA is a Catholic university owned by the Opus Dei (nothing against the Opus Judei though but is true). The UTDT, even though it has a number of jewish students is not religiously oriented...

Just my (or mi friend's) point of view but if I were you I'd rather make some research in all the big law firms in Buenos Aires and you will find UTDT lawyers working there, not many because of the small and selective application process though.
quote
I do not know if you represent UTDT or if you are just a student of it, but your are using tricky arguments:

1. Job prospective. Say whatever you want I do not know if 100% secure a job or not after graduating. The only thing I know is that in Argentine law firms (at least, top law firms) there are almost no UTDT lawyers. It is a matter of fact.

2. Professors. Again, I do not know if you are talking about LLM career or graduate career. UBA, UA and UCA do also have that professors but also have other professors that UTDT do not have. On the other hand, what you have said in connection with professors salaries it is a stupid thing it is a problem of professors and not from students. It does not care if a professor has or not a good salary, the only thing I want is to be taught by them. Moreover, in spite of the fact of the salary, most of professors prefer to be teach at UBA or UCA than in UTDT, because their prestige

3. Religion. Please do not continue with this argument because it has no sense what you have been saying. You only have to see this web site and you will find thousands of catholic universities around the world, and I have never heard such stupid thing that students from that universities do not develop their reasoning skills!!!

Finally yes, I will have to make a BIG research to find a UTDT lawyer in a law firm
I do not know if you represent UTDT or if you are just a student of it, but your are using tricky arguments:

1. Job prospective. Say whatever you want… I do not know if 100% secure a job or not after graduating. The only thing I know is that in Argentine law firms (at least, top law firms) there are almost no UTDT lawyers. It is a matter of fact.

2. Professors. Again, I do not know if you are talking about LLM career or graduate career. UBA, UA and UCA do also have that professors but also have other professors that UTDT do not have. On the other hand, what you have said in connection with professors salaries it is a stupid thing… it is a problem of professors and not from students. It does not care if a professor has or not a good salary, the only thing I want is to be taught by them. Moreover, in spite of the fact of the salary, most of professors prefer to be teach at UBA or UCA than in UTDT, because their prestige…

3. Religion. Please do not continue with this argument because it has no sense what you have been saying. You only have to see this web site and you will find thousands of catholic universities around the world, and I have never heard such stupid thing that students from that universities do not develop their reasoning skills!!!

Finally… yes, I will have to make a BIG research to find a UTDT lawyer in a law firm…
quote
I am from Argentina and I agree in all with Lionel Hutz.
I am from Argentina and I agree in all with Lionel Hutz.
quote
mann57
Hi,
I'm a law student in Frankfurt/Germany and I would love to do a LL.M. in South America. The problem is I can`t speak any spanish and I have not done my 1 state examination but I have met all requirements for graduation. I was told that you can do your LL.M even if you haven't done your 1 state examination. But then it takes a year longer. I would like to go to Lima/Peru, Mexico or Columbia. But I am willing to take any other suggestions. Is it possible to take part in the LL.M programme without any spanish. Well I'm starting a beginner course in a weeks time. But I'll just learn the basics. I would like to learn the language when I'm in South America.
It would be great if someone could help me out.
Thanks.
Hi,
I'm a law student in Frankfurt/Germany and I would love to do a LL.M. in South America. The problem is I can`t speak any spanish and I have not done my 1 state examination but I have met all requirements for graduation. I was told that you can do your LL.M even if you haven't done your 1 state examination. But then it takes a year longer. I would like to go to Lima/Peru, Mexico or Columbia. But I am willing to take any other suggestions. Is it possible to take part in the LL.M programme without any spanish. Well I'm starting a beginner course in a weeks time. But I'll just learn the basics. I would like to learn the language when I'm in South America.
It would be great if someone could help me out.
Thanks.
quote
Anmaldo
Hey guys!
Check the LL.M in International and Investment Law at the Heidelberg University. I think this could be a very good choice if you want to improve your spanish and your native language is english. It takes only one year in Santiago, Chili, where the weather is great and the people is so cool...Ah! By the way, you pay only one tuition fee and you will obtain a double degree (Universidad de Chile LLM and Heidelberg University, too!!).
FYI, in the last edition of the time`s ranking (THE-QS World University Rankings), Heidelberg University was placed as the first University in Germany.
I definitely recommend this program.
If you have any questions don`t hesitate to contact me.
Cheers!
Hey guys!
Check the LL.M in International and Investment Law at the Heidelberg University. I think this could be a very good choice if you want to improve your spanish and your native language is english. It takes only one year in Santiago, Chili, where the weather is great and the people is so cool...Ah! By the way, you pay only one tuition fee and you will obtain a double degree (Universidad de Chile LLM and Heidelberg University, too!!).
FYI, in the last edition of the time`s ranking (THE-QS World University Rankings), Heidelberg University was placed as the first University in Germany.
I definitely recommend this program.
If you have any questions don`t hesitate to contact me.
Cheers!
quote
hi everyone, I'm very interested in the llm in International and Investment Law at the Heidelberg Center, but I found a similar llm with a double degree (Universidad del Salvador en Buenos Aires and Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne) somebody knows about this program especially the tuition fees, the admission standars and instructions, the university's prestige.

Thank you.
hi everyone, I'm very interested in the llm in International and Investment Law at the Heidelberg Center, but I found a similar llm with a double degree (Universidad del Salvador en Buenos Aires and Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne) somebody knows about this program especially the tuition fees, the admission standars and instructions, the university's prestige.

Thank you.
quote
tez
Hello all. My situation is as follows:

After I finished my undergraduate degree in 2007, I left to travel with the idea to go back to the USA for law school one day. Now I have been living in Buenos Aires for 6 months and the thought came to me, why don't I go to law school out here? I speak quite good Spanish, I've checked with the Post-graduate program at UBA, and I am qualified to attend the school this year (March 2009).

My question: The program I am interested in is a 400 hour "Carrera de Especializacion en Recursos Naturales." What does that mean eactly? I've gone over the coursework and the classes and it is exactly what I want to study, but I am having trouble translating what this degree means, exactly, and how is compares to what I would receive in the US. In the US, most people go to law school for their Juris Doctorate (JD), am I wrong? There is a doctorate program at UBA but to me it reads more like a PhD in law, after which one receives the title of Doctor. UBA also offers Maestrias (Master's), but they don't have the area of study that I am interested in.

Anyone who can help me out with these questions I would be greatly appreciative. Right now I am also emailing Universities in the US with hopes they will let me know about levels of acceptance of foreign degrees and things like that.

Thanks so much

Tez.
Hello all. My situation is as follows:

After I finished my undergraduate degree in 2007, I left to travel with the idea to go back to the USA for law school one day. Now I have been living in Buenos Aires for 6 months and the thought came to me, why don't I go to law school out here? I speak quite good Spanish, I've checked with the Post-graduate program at UBA, and I am qualified to attend the school this year (March 2009).

My question: The program I am interested in is a 400 hour "Carrera de Especializacion en Recursos Naturales." What does that mean eactly? I've gone over the coursework and the classes and it is exactly what I want to study, but I am having trouble translating what this degree means, exactly, and how is compares to what I would receive in the US. In the US, most people go to law school for their Juris Doctorate (JD), am I wrong? There is a doctorate program at UBA but to me it reads more like a PhD in law, after which one receives the title of Doctor. UBA also offers Maestrias (Master's), but they don't have the area of study that I am interested in.

Anyone who can help me out with these questions I would be greatly appreciative. Right now I am also emailing Universities in the US with hopes they will let me know about levels of acceptance of foreign degrees and things like that.

Thanks so much

Tez.
quote
Hey tez, the thing is as follows:

Our law degree (your J.D.) is abogacía. Once you have your law degree, you can do post-graduate studies. Within this post-graduate studies you have:
- Doctorado (your Ph.D.)
- Maestrías (your LL.M.)
- Especializaciones, cursos, etc. (these are different type of courses, some are more important than others, the lenght is different, the difficulty too, etc.)

Best
Hey tez, the thing is as follows:

Our law degree (your J.D.) is abogacía. Once you have your law degree, you can do post-graduate studies. Within this post-graduate studies you have:
- Doctorado (your Ph.D.)
- Maestrías (your LL.M.)
- Especializaciones, cursos, etc. (these are different type of courses, some are more important than others, the lenght is different, the difficulty too, etc.)

Best
quote

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