USC vs BU


I got admitted by USC and BU. For BU, it is the banking and financial program, USC--general program. So I wonder if anyone could give me your idea on such two schools and help me make my decision. It is difficult for me to choose since the ranking of these 2 schools are very close.

I got admitted by USC and BU. For BU, it is the banking and financial program, USC--general program. So I wonder if anyone could give me your idea on such two schools and help me make my decision. It is difficult for me to choose since the ranking of these 2 schools are very close.
quote
Red Sox

I think you should take a holistic view of things. The advantage with USC is that a foreign lawyer can appear for the California bar. Otherwise, both LA and Boston are big cities. Another factor to keep in mind is what specialization one would like to do. If I am not mistaken, USC is quite an expensive school. What opportunities one will have after the completion of the course is another factor?

By the way, I have also been admitted to the banking and financial law LLM program at BU for 2010-2011. I have also got through UCLA and UT-Austin, but might go for BU.

Which country are you from? If you choose BU, do let me know?

I think you should take a holistic view of things. The advantage with USC is that a foreign lawyer can appear for the California bar. Otherwise, both LA and Boston are big cities. Another factor to keep in mind is what specialization one would like to do. If I am not mistaken, USC is quite an expensive school. What opportunities one will have after the completion of the course is another factor?

By the way, I have also been admitted to the banking and financial law LLM program at BU for 2010-2011. I have also got through UCLA and UT-Austin, but might go for BU.

Which country are you from? If you choose BU, do let me know?
quote

I just graduated from the USC LLM program this year, from my experience, I think USC has three major advantages as follows:

1. I think most LLM students do care about the bar exam and this is one of the most important parts of our one year studying. I think USC law does a great job for the bar preparation for all law school students. For example, Professor Heilman (also teaches for barbri) who teaches two courses specifically catered to the Bar exam in USC, will give students four workshops (4 hours for one workshop) about bar preparation in the second semester, which is really great help to the students, especially the foreign students.
This year, there was an excellent JD student who led a bar preparation group study every Saturday for 4 hours in USC law school for LLM students who are interested. The G&IP office provides many materials and help that students need for the bar exam.
2. USC law school has a good mentorship program, where every LLM student is paired with a JD partner, allowing LLM students to communicate with and share resources with JD students. This encourages LLM students to know and learn more from the native speaker, and also provides the LLM student with the opportunity to benefit from the USC law school network.
3. I think USC law school does a very good job in providing various services to their students. The USC LLM program has around 100 students every year, and there are 7 staff to help us in daily studying. Whenever you need help about class, job, bar preparation, or in any other matters, they will give you professional and effective advice as you need.

USC, of course, why not!!

I just graduated from the USC LLM program this year, from my experience, I think USC has three major advantages as follows:

1. I think most LLM students do care about the bar exam and this is one of the most important parts of our one year studying. I think USC law does a great job for the bar preparation for all law school students. For example, Professor Heilman (also teaches for barbri) who teaches two courses specifically catered to the Bar exam in USC, will give students four workshops (4 hours for one workshop) about bar preparation in the second semester, which is really great help to the students, especially the foreign students.
This year, there was an excellent JD student who led a bar preparation group study every Saturday for 4 hours in USC law school for LLM students who are interested. The G&IP office provides many materials and help that students need for the bar exam.
2. USC law school has a good mentorship program, where every LLM student is paired with a JD partner, allowing LLM students to communicate with and share resources with JD students. This encourages LLM students to know and learn more from the native speaker, and also provides the LLM student with the opportunity to benefit from the USC law school network.
3. I think USC law school does a very good job in providing various services to their students. The USC LLM program has around 100 students every year, and there are 7 staff to help us in daily studying. Whenever you need help about class, job, bar preparation, or in any other matters, they will give you professional and effective advice as you need.

USC, of course, why not!!
quote
tota

Congratulations on your graduation! I was admitted to USC with a scholarship but decided not to go for various reasons. USC is a great law school. But... I have one question : I was told by a fellow student of yours that this year the pairing with the JD students did not happen. Was this information false ?

Congratulations on your graduation! I was admitted to USC with a scholarship but decided not to go for various reasons. USC is a great law school. But... I have one question : I was told by a fellow student of yours that this year the pairing with the JD students did not happen. Was this information false ?
quote

Congratulations on your graduation! I was admitted to USC with a scholarship but decided not to go for various reasons. USC is a great law school. But... I have one question : I was told by a fellow student of yours that this year the pairing with the JD students did not happen. Was this information false ?



I heard lots of admitted students to USC give up their admission. Why? Could anyone tell me the reasons?

<blockquote>Congratulations on your graduation! I was admitted to USC with a scholarship but decided not to go for various reasons. USC is a great law school. But... I have one question : I was told by a fellow student of yours that this year the pairing with the JD students did not happen. Was this information false ? </blockquote>


I heard lots of admitted students to USC give up their admission. Why? Could anyone tell me the reasons?
quote
yahn

I graduated from the LLM program at USC in 2009, and will try to provide some answers to the issues mentioned above.

1. Students giving up admissions to USC

Although I have no firsthand knowledge of students giving up their admissions to USC, there may be a few reasons why some may choose to do so. The first thing that comes to my mind is their possible preference for schools on the east coast for their locality. Big metropolitan cities like NYC may be very attractive to some people. They may also choose another school for their specific area of interest, e.g., environmental law, IP etc.

Personally, I too used to be a great fan of NYC, but it all changed ever since coming to LA for my studies at USC. I visited NYC after living in LA for a year, and was shocked to see the difference in quality of life between the two cities. In the summer in NYC, the weather was humid, the subway was stuffy and stinky, it would suddenly start raining, and you can't get taxis -- the list goes on. New Yorkers pay almost twice as much the rent as LA people, and get less for their money in shops and restaurants. Then you have to fight with the snow and freezing weather in the winter. In striking contrast, LA has warm weather all year around with a dry summer and a mild winter. You will enjoy the sunshine, ocean breeze, and perfect blue sky most time of the year. Having better weather means you get to enjoy more outdoor activities, such as going to the beach, hiking, surfing, etc. LA also offers a great number of trendy bars, restaurants, and clubs peppered throughout the city. What I also appreciate most about LA is its unique mix of diverse cultures all in their most authentic forms.

USC Law has special strengths in corporate and entertainment law. Starting this year, USC will launch its Business Law and Entertainment Law certificate programs. See the following links for more info:

http://mylaw2.usc.edu/portal/academics/registration/reg/BusCertificate.cfm

http://mylaw2.usc.edu/portal/academics/registration/reg/EntCertificate.cfm

2. JD/ LLM Partnership Program at USC

I personally organized the JD/ LLM Partnership Program last year, so have inside knowledge of the program. Around 100 LLMs and 90 JDs took part last year, and the shortfall in the JDs was made up by matching up multiple LLMs with a JD. This method became very successful in the end, because LLMs could meet more JDs this way, and more informal gatherings started growing organically. For example, I personally attended some dinners with 8 LLMs and 5 JDs, and they regularly met up for meals and drinks, almost too many times that I couldn't join them a few times!

If any people were not matched with partners it's probably because they submitted their application late. We even tried to accommodate the late comers by paring them up with JDs who already had partners.

The program was a record success last year, and we plan to expand the program even further to cultivate authentic friendships and networking opportunities between the JD and LLM student bodies.

Final remark: USC should be your first choice school, based on a strong track record of highest student satisfaction among the grads. Hope you can all join the USC LLM family!

Yumi

I graduated from the LLM program at USC in 2009, and will try to provide some answers to the issues mentioned above.

1. Students giving up admissions to USC

Although I have no firsthand knowledge of students giving up their admissions to USC, there may be a few reasons why some may choose to do so. The first thing that comes to my mind is their possible preference for schools on the east coast for their locality. Big metropolitan cities like NYC may be very attractive to some people. They may also choose another school for their specific area of interest, e.g., environmental law, IP etc.

Personally, I too used to be a great fan of NYC, but it all changed ever since coming to LA for my studies at USC. I visited NYC after living in LA for a year, and was shocked to see the difference in quality of life between the two cities. In the summer in NYC, the weather was humid, the subway was stuffy and stinky, it would suddenly start raining, and you can't get taxis -- the list goes on. New Yorkers pay almost twice as much the rent as LA people, and get less for their money in shops and restaurants. Then you have to fight with the snow and freezing weather in the winter. In striking contrast, LA has warm weather all year around with a dry summer and a mild winter. You will enjoy the sunshine, ocean breeze, and perfect blue sky most time of the year. Having better weather means you get to enjoy more outdoor activities, such as going to the beach, hiking, surfing, etc. LA also offers a great number of trendy bars, restaurants, and clubs peppered throughout the city. What I also appreciate most about LA is its unique mix of diverse cultures all in their most authentic forms.

USC Law has special strengths in corporate and entertainment law. Starting this year, USC will launch its Business Law and Entertainment Law certificate programs. See the following links for more info:

http://mylaw2.usc.edu/portal/academics/registration/reg/BusCertificate.cfm

http://mylaw2.usc.edu/portal/academics/registration/reg/EntCertificate.cfm

2. JD/ LLM Partnership Program at USC

I personally organized the JD/ LLM Partnership Program last year, so have inside knowledge of the program. Around 100 LLMs and 90 JDs took part last year, and the shortfall in the JDs was made up by matching up multiple LLMs with a JD. This method became very successful in the end, because LLMs could meet more JDs this way, and more informal gatherings started growing organically. For example, I personally attended some dinners with 8 LLMs and 5 JDs, and they regularly met up for meals and drinks, almost too many times that I couldn't join them a few times!

If any people were not matched with partners it's probably because they submitted their application late. We even tried to accommodate the late comers by paring them up with JDs who already had partners.

The program was a record success last year, and we plan to expand the program even further to cultivate authentic friendships and networking opportunities between the JD and LLM student bodies.

Final remark: USC should be your first choice school, based on a strong track record of highest student satisfaction among the grads. Hope you can all join the USC LLM family!

Yumi

quote
chincho

Hello. So it is possible to take the Bar after completing the LLM program at USC?

Hello. So it is possible to take the Bar after completing the LLM program at USC?
quote
hny_flying

@chincho : yes it is. Infact, you don't even need the LLM to apply for bar in California. You can check the numerous other posts on this website discussing this thread.

@chincho : yes it is. Infact, you don't even need the LLM to apply for bar in California. You can check the numerous other posts on this website discussing this thread.

quote
hny_flying

@ yahn and huhuhu2010: Since you guys are past students of USC llm, could you tell us the career prospects after finishing the course and passing the bar for foreign lawyers? I am final year law student in the process of deciding whether spending 70000 dollars on LLM ( and extra amount on bar) is worth it. Is there a possibility of finding a normal-reasonable paying job, that one can build up on later. Anyone from your class or network who has a successful story?

I know this topic has been beaten to death, but you must understand the anxiety of LLM applicants very well, considering you were once too. Any views would be appreciated!

Thx :-)

@ yahn and huhuhu2010: Since you guys are past students of USC llm, could you tell us the career prospects after finishing the course and passing the bar for foreign lawyers? I am final year law student in the process of deciding whether spending 70000 dollars on LLM ( and extra amount on bar) is worth it. Is there a possibility of finding a normal-reasonable paying job, that one can build up on later. Anyone from your class or network who has a successful story?

I know this topic has been beaten to death, but you must understand the anxiety of LLM applicants very well, considering you were once too. Any views would be appreciated!

Thx :-)
quote
chincho

Yes, but I have foreign Bachelors is that enough for the Bar?. Sorry for asking, but you got me curious.

Yes, but I have foreign Bachelors is that enough for the Bar?. Sorry for asking, but you got me curious.
quote
hny_flying

Obviously one needs to be a law graduate to be admitted to any bar. Else, it would be like letting an economics student become a professional doctor. In addition to being a law graduate one needs to be licensed to practice in a foreign jurisdiction. This is just for California bar, and rest of the states have their own requirements. For example, NY bar requires a study of at least 20 credits (this can be fulfilled by the LLM degree.)

You can always check out the California bar exam website for more information. It has a specific link for foreign lawyers. But, bear in mind that only a foreign 'lawyer' and neither undergraduate or graduate will be allowed to appear for the bar exam.

Obviously one needs to be a law graduate to be admitted to any bar. Else, it would be like letting an economics student become a professional doctor. In addition to being a law graduate one needs to be licensed to practice in a foreign jurisdiction. This is just for California bar, and rest of the states have their own requirements. For example, NY bar requires a study of at least 20 credits (this can be fulfilled by the LLM degree.)

You can always check out the California bar exam website for more information. It has a specific link for foreign lawyers. But, bear in mind that only a foreign 'lawyer' and neither undergraduate or graduate will be allowed to appear for the bar exam.
quote
MAB79

I got admitted by USC and BU. For BU, it is the banking and financial program, USC--general program. So I wonder if anyone could give me your idea on such two schools and help me make my decision. It is difficult for me to choose since the ranking of these 2 schools are very close.


If you wanna work in banking and finance, BU offers one of the best programs. I have 2 friends that graduated it and unlike LL.Ms from top five schools they managed it to get a job. Unless you don't wanna go into that specialization, go for that program. It has a great reputation worldwide (and by that I am not saying USC doesn't but I just know that BU Banking could be an advantage)

<blockquote>I got admitted by USC and BU. For BU, it is the banking and financial program, USC--general program. So I wonder if anyone could give me your idea on such two schools and help me make my decision. It is difficult for me to choose since the ranking of these 2 schools are very close. </blockquote>

If you wanna work in banking and finance, BU offers one of the best programs. I have 2 friends that graduated it and unlike LL.Ms from top five schools they managed it to get a job. Unless you don't wanna go into that specialization, go for that program. It has a great reputation worldwide (and by that I am not saying USC doesn't but I just know that BU Banking could be an advantage)
quote
MAB79

@ yahn and huhuhu2010: Since you guys are past students of USC llm, could you tell us the career prospects after finishing the course and passing the bar for foreign lawyers? I am final year law student in the process of deciding whether spending 70000 dollars on LLM ( and extra amount on bar) is worth it. Is there a possibility of finding a normal-reasonable paying job, that one can build up on later. Anyone from your class or network who has a successful story?

I know this topic has been beaten to death, but you must understand the anxiety of LLM applicants very well, considering you were once too. Any views would be appreciated!

Thx :-)


Last week, the job fair took place. If you consider to do an LL.M in order to get a job in the U.S, just don't do it. You will spend probably more than 70k and will not be able to get a job offer, unless you have a unique background or are from a country of interest for law firms, such as brazil etc.

I love my LL.M program but since I never actually had the aim to stay in the U.S., I think it was worth it. Probably, one of my personal advantages was that I already worked as a lawyer and actually enhance my skills for future deals etc. But don't come here if u wanna get a job. These times are over...

<blockquote>@ yahn and huhuhu2010: Since you guys are past students of USC llm, could you tell us the career prospects after finishing the course and passing the bar for foreign lawyers? I am final year law student in the process of deciding whether spending 70000 dollars on LLM ( and extra amount on bar) is worth it. Is there a possibility of finding a normal-reasonable paying job, that one can build up on later. Anyone from your class or network who has a successful story?

I know this topic has been beaten to death, but you must understand the anxiety of LLM applicants very well, considering you were once too. Any views would be appreciated!

Thx :-)</blockquote>

Last week, the job fair took place. If you consider to do an LL.M in order to get a job in the U.S, just don't do it. You will spend probably more than 70k and will not be able to get a job offer, unless you have a unique background or are from a country of interest for law firms, such as brazil etc.

I love my LL.M program but since I never actually had the aim to stay in the U.S., I think it was worth it. Probably, one of my personal advantages was that I already worked as a lawyer and actually enhance my skills for future deals etc. But don't come here if u wanna get a job. These times are over...
quote
MAB79

I graduated from the LLM program at USC in 2009, and will try to provide some answers to the issues mentioned above.

1. Students giving up admissions to USC

Although I have no firsthand knowledge of students giving up their admissions to USC, there may be a few reasons why some may choose to do so. The first thing that comes to my mind is their possible preference for schools on the east coast for their locality. Big metropolitan cities like NYC may be very attractive to some people. They may also choose another school for their specific area of interest, e.g., environmental law, IP etc.

Personally, I too used to be a great fan of NYC, but it all changed ever since coming to LA for my studies at USC. I visited NYC after living in LA for a year, and was shocked to see the difference in quality of life between the two cities. In the summer in NYC, the weather was humid, the subway was stuffy and stinky, it would suddenly start raining, and you can't get taxis -- the list goes on. New Yorkers pay almost twice as much the rent as LA people, and get less for their money in shops and restaurants. Then you have to fight with the snow and freezing weather in the winter. In striking contrast, LA has warm weather all year around with a dry summer and a mild winter. You will enjoy the sunshine, ocean breeze, and perfect blue sky most time of the year. Having better weather means you get to enjoy more outdoor activities, such as going to the beach, hiking, surfing, etc. LA also offers a great number of trendy bars, restaurants, and clubs peppered throughout the city. What I also appreciate most about LA is its unique mix of diverse cultures all in their most authentic forms.

USC Law has special strengths in corporate and entertainment law. Starting this year, USC will launch its Business Law and Entertainment Law certificate programs. See the following links for more info:

http://mylaw2.usc.edu/portal/academics/registration/reg/BusCertificate.cfm

http://mylaw2.usc.edu/portal/academics/registration/reg/EntCertificate.cfm

2. JD/ LLM Partnership Program at USC

I personally organized the JD/ LLM Partnership Program last year, so have inside knowledge of the program. Around 100 LLMs and 90 JDs took part last year, and the shortfall in the JDs was made up by matching up multiple LLMs with a JD. This method became very successful in the end, because LLMs could meet more JDs this way, and more informal gatherings started growing organically. For example, I personally attended some dinners with 8 LLMs and 5 JDs, and they regularly met up for meals and drinks, almost too many times that I couldn't join them a few times!

If any people were not matched with partners it's probably because they submitted their application late. We even tried to accommodate the late comers by paring them up with JDs who already had partners.

The program was a record success last year, and we plan to expand the program even further to cultivate authentic friendships and networking opportunities between the JD and LLM student bodies.

Final remark: USC should be your first choice school, based on a strong track record of highest student satisfaction among the grads. Hope you can all join the USC LLM family!

Yumi



I am fascinated by how you talk about live quality and stuffed and sticky subways in NYC. I don't think these two cities can be compared at all. But if you wanna go that track, u forgot to mention that NYC still is the financial, cultural and culinary center of the world. It has a crime rate way, way below LA. You talk bad about the subway system and how sticky it is? Well the last time I have been to LA, they actually didn't offer me public transportation and the cabs were way overprized. In NYC, I can jump into the subway at 2 am and drive way up to Harlem, wehere I live witjout actually getting harassed etc. I don't need to buy a car to get to the other end of the city but can buy a single ride subway ticket to get to coney island which costs me 2.25 and takes me to the sea, where I can relax on hot summer weekends.
Regarding cultural diversities according to stats NY beats LA.

I can go to the best art galleries, muesums and concerts with a large student discount, if not for free. There are always prix fixe menus in the best restaurants in town, such as Jean-Georges etc. To shop, I don't need to decide if I wanna go to a mall and if I need to buy or rent a car for that. i can also jump into the subway and drive to soho, 5th or both etc. And if I buy something, I can afford a cab because they are not expensive and everywhere in NYC. U got everything in walking distance if u need it, also late night.
If u wanna relax and enjot some quiet time, u can go to central, riverside or other parks. Ubcan take a boat trip, u can go to Brooklyn and relax while looking to Manhattan etc.
It's true that the rents still are pretty high, but then again, I don't need a car.
I think u are right when u feel that NYC might be busier than other cities but still, you will find places that show you that even in NYC you find quiet spots with a lot relaxation possibilities...don't get me wrong....I lived in LA for almost 6 months and somehow like the city...but it simply is not a city with a lot of life quality except for the weather and the beaches, which u also have in NYC.

And regarding the schools and eductaion. LA has very good schools, but can they really compete with Columbia or NYU? I mean at Columbia you can take classes with Professor Coffee, who is probably the leading corporate, in particular securities lawyer in the U.S.

And both schools have amazing LL.M programs and great stuff showing you that they care. They know the name of every single student. They care about you, you have get togethers on a regular basis and career services are simply amazing in using the alumni pool, which leads to the leading law firms and companies...

So, I think that there are many reason why you can decide to go to LA but it is not for quality of living aspects etc. As a matter of fact, I think if you would look for that you would chose San Fran over LA....

<blockquote>I graduated from the LLM program at USC in 2009, and will try to provide some answers to the issues mentioned above.

1. Students giving up admissions to USC

Although I have no firsthand knowledge of students giving up their admissions to USC, there may be a few reasons why some may choose to do so. The first thing that comes to my mind is their possible preference for schools on the east coast for their locality. Big metropolitan cities like NYC may be very attractive to some people. They may also choose another school for their specific area of interest, e.g., environmental law, IP etc.

Personally, I too used to be a great fan of NYC, but it all changed ever since coming to LA for my studies at USC. I visited NYC after living in LA for a year, and was shocked to see the difference in quality of life between the two cities. In the summer in NYC, the weather was humid, the subway was stuffy and stinky, it would suddenly start raining, and you can't get taxis -- the list goes on. New Yorkers pay almost twice as much the rent as LA people, and get less for their money in shops and restaurants. Then you have to fight with the snow and freezing weather in the winter. In striking contrast, LA has warm weather all year around with a dry summer and a mild winter. You will enjoy the sunshine, ocean breeze, and perfect blue sky most time of the year. Having better weather means you get to enjoy more outdoor activities, such as going to the beach, hiking, surfing, etc. LA also offers a great number of trendy bars, restaurants, and clubs peppered throughout the city. What I also appreciate most about LA is its unique mix of diverse cultures all in their most authentic forms.

USC Law has special strengths in corporate and entertainment law. Starting this year, USC will launch its Business Law and Entertainment Law certificate programs. See the following links for more info:

http://mylaw2.usc.edu/portal/academics/registration/reg/BusCertificate.cfm

http://mylaw2.usc.edu/portal/academics/registration/reg/EntCertificate.cfm

2. JD/ LLM Partnership Program at USC

I personally organized the JD/ LLM Partnership Program last year, so have inside knowledge of the program. Around 100 LLMs and 90 JDs took part last year, and the shortfall in the JDs was made up by matching up multiple LLMs with a JD. This method became very successful in the end, because LLMs could meet more JDs this way, and more informal gatherings started growing organically. For example, I personally attended some dinners with 8 LLMs and 5 JDs, and they regularly met up for meals and drinks, almost too many times that I couldn't join them a few times!

If any people were not matched with partners it's probably because they submitted their application late. We even tried to accommodate the late comers by paring them up with JDs who already had partners.

The program was a record success last year, and we plan to expand the program even further to cultivate authentic friendships and networking opportunities between the JD and LLM student bodies.

Final remark: USC should be your first choice school, based on a strong track record of highest student satisfaction among the grads. Hope you can all join the USC LLM family!

Yumi

</blockquote>

I am fascinated by how you talk about live quality and stuffed and sticky subways in NYC. I don't think these two cities can be compared at all. But if you wanna go that track, u forgot to mention that NYC still is the financial, cultural and culinary center of the world. It has a crime rate way, way below LA. You talk bad about the subway system and how sticky it is? Well the last time I have been to LA, they actually didn't offer me public transportation and the cabs were way overprized. In NYC, I can jump into the subway at 2 am and drive way up to Harlem, wehere I live witjout actually getting harassed etc. I don't need to buy a car to get to the other end of the city but can buy a single ride subway ticket to get to coney island which costs me 2.25 and takes me to the sea, where I can relax on hot summer weekends.
Regarding cultural diversities according to stats NY beats LA.

I can go to the best art galleries, muesums and concerts with a large student discount, if not for free. There are always prix fixe menus in the best restaurants in town, such as Jean-Georges etc. To shop, I don't need to decide if I wanna go to a mall and if I need to buy or rent a car for that. i can also jump into the subway and drive to soho, 5th or both etc. And if I buy something, I can afford a cab because they are not expensive and everywhere in NYC. U got everything in walking distance if u need it, also late night.
If u wanna relax and enjot some quiet time, u can go to central, riverside or other parks. Ubcan take a boat trip, u can go to Brooklyn and relax while looking to Manhattan etc.
It's true that the rents still are pretty high, but then again, I don't need a car.
I think u are right when u feel that NYC might be busier than other cities but still, you will find places that show you that even in NYC you find quiet spots with a lot relaxation possibilities...don't get me wrong....I lived in LA for almost 6 months and somehow like the city...but it simply is not a city with a lot of life quality except for the weather and the beaches, which u also have in NYC.

And regarding the schools and eductaion. LA has very good schools, but can they really compete with Columbia or NYU? I mean at Columbia you can take classes with Professor Coffee, who is probably the leading corporate, in particular securities lawyer in the U.S.

And both schools have amazing LL.M programs and great stuff showing you that they care. They know the name of every single student. They care about you, you have get togethers on a regular basis and career services are simply amazing in using the alumni pool, which leads to the leading law firms and companies...

So, I think that there are many reason why you can decide to go to LA but it is not for quality of living aspects etc. As a matter of fact, I think if you would look for that you would chose San Fran over LA....
quote
Gwada

I got admitted by USC and BU. For BU, it is the banking and financial program, USC--general program. So I wonder if anyone could give me your idea on such two schools and help me make my decision. It is difficult for me to choose since the ranking of these 2 schools are very close.


I have also a problem. I've been admitted to USC with a substancial scholarship and got admitted to Duke without a scholarship. I don't know what to do and which one to choose. I need your advice. Thank you all

<blockquote>I got admitted by USC and BU. For BU, it is the banking and financial program, USC--general program. So I wonder if anyone could give me your idea on such two schools and help me make my decision. It is difficult for me to choose since the ranking of these 2 schools are very close. </blockquote>

I have also a problem. I've been admitted to USC with a substancial scholarship and got admitted to Duke without a scholarship. I don't know what to do and which one to choose. I need your advice. Thank you all
quote

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