The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy


Hello Everybody,

I am a current student of the LL.M at Fletcher and would be willing to answer any questions that you may have. But, I would appreciate very much if you were to post your questions here, instead of sending personal messages.

It is likely that my answer to one of you may help others!!

That's it!!

See ya,

ML
Hello Everybody,

I am a current student of the LL.M at Fletcher and would be willing to answer any questions that you may have. But, I would appreciate very much if you were to post your questions here, instead of sending personal messages.

It is likely that my answer to one of you may help others!!

That's it!!

See ya,

ML
quote
Mjones
Hi, I've heard some very good things about the program-- I'm curious to know some more details. What is the High Table?
Also, can you take classes throughout the school? I'm interested in international conflict resolution. Will I find enough courses to take?

thanks,
Mjones
Hi, I've heard some very good things about the program-- I'm curious to know some more details. What is the High Table?
Also, can you take classes throughout the school? I'm interested in international conflict resolution. Will I find enough courses to take?

thanks,
Mjones
quote
I'm looking at a few other schools-- Harvard, HEI, Columbia, Cambridge, Georgetown. I think for international relations it would be hard to beat Fletcher, especially in the U.S. -- but it is so different from other schools it's hard to compare. I like that you can take classes across the school rather than being limited to only law classes.What is it like being in a law program in a non-law school? I also understand it is designed as a small program, about 25 students, which I think is one of the smaller programs -- what are your classmates like? Are they mainly from the US or are many from abroad?

thank you for your time,
Francois
I'm looking at a few other schools-- Harvard, HEI, Columbia, Cambridge, Georgetown. I think for international relations it would be hard to beat Fletcher, especially in the U.S. -- but it is so different from other schools it's hard to compare. I like that you can take classes across the school rather than being limited to only law classes.What is it like being in a law program in a non-law school? I also understand it is designed as a small program, about 25 students, which I think is one of the smaller programs -- what are your classmates like? Are they mainly from the US or are many from abroad?

thank you for your time,
Francois
quote
Mr. Lawyer
Mate,

I firmly recommend the LL.M in International Law of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy.

The best LL.M in the area in the US. Great faculty, wide variety of options, possibility to focus the programme on your necessities, plus a chance to study courses that are not strictly related to law or attend seminars in other law faculties (HLS, BU, BC, Northestern) if you want to.

The greatest mix I ever seen!

The fact that Fletcher is not a Law School doesn´t affect whatsoever the quality of the programme. Actually, I would say that this school has been an International Law School
for the last 75 years

Best,

ML
Mate,

I firmly recommend the LL.M in International Law of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy.

The best LL.M in the area in the US. Great faculty, wide variety of options, possibility to focus the programme on your necessities, plus a chance to study courses that are not strictly related to law or attend seminars in other law faculties (HLS, BU, BC, Northestern) if you want to.

The greatest mix I ever seen!

The fact that Fletcher is not a Law School doesn´t affect whatsoever the quality of the programme. Actually, I would say that this school has been an International Law School
for the last 75 years

Best,

ML
quote
Hey Guys,

I will try to answer your questions.

1) The high table is an event that is part of our program in which an important personality of the local legal community, (e.g. the Dean of the School, Honorable Professors) or even important practitioners, (e.g. a member of the State Supreme Court, or an Partner of an Important Law Firm) come to the school in order to have a pleasant lunch with our group. During this lunch, we always discuss a selected topic of great relevance for International Law.

2) This program is certainly the most exclusive in the US. The whole intake is of 25 students only. It provides us with a very intimate environment to study and a very close contact with members of the Law Faculty.

3) We a very diverse group of students. Among us there are Americans, a Brazilian, Italians, Belgians, Japaneses, a South Korean, a girl from Kenya, an Argentinian, a Rwandan, a Saudi Arabian, just to name a few.

In case you need extra info, please let me know.

Best,

Rafael
Hey Guys,

I will try to answer your questions.

1) The high table is an event that is part of our program in which an important personality of the local legal community, (e.g. the Dean of the School, Honorable Professors) or even important practitioners, (e.g. a member of the State Supreme Court, or an Partner of an Important Law Firm) come to the school in order to have a pleasant lunch with our group. During this lunch, we always discuss a selected topic of great relevance for International Law.

2) This program is certainly the most exclusive in the US. The whole intake is of 25 students only. It provides us with a very intimate environment to study and a very close contact with members of the Law Faculty.

3) We a very diverse group of students. Among us there are Americans, a Brazilian, Italians, Belgians, Japaneses, a South Korean, a girl from Kenya, an Argentinian, a Rwandan, a Saudi Arabian, just to name a few.

In case you need extra info, please let me know.

Best,

Rafael
quote
QSWE
Dear Rafeal Lima,
At the outset I must thank you on behalf of every reader for the insightful knowledge that you are sharing here. I would like to ask this one question. I know that being an LLM student yourself, you might not be in the right position to answer my query, but I would be highly obliged if you could base your response on the profiles of various students who are taking LLM along with you.
I have been quite interested in the MA (Law & Diplomacy) and LLM (Int. Law) at Fletcher SLD. My concern is with regards to the "relevant work experience" column which states 1-2 and 3-5 years repectively for both the programmes. It also states that work as intern shall be taken into account. It also states that min. 1 year of international experience is required.
Now, I have completed LLB in India with the requisite qualifications for FSLD. I have been interning continually over the past 3 years for a period that would amount to aroung 24 months. At the moment, I am not doing any work but reading for a prospective LLM in UK. I have been already accepted at Kings College London and would be taking up Tax/Corporate/Competition Laws (My applications are pending at LSE n Oxbridge so cant decide where I will end up taking LLM).
Do you think for FSLD, 2 years of certified work as an intern shall fulfill the need of work-ex. Also, would an LLM in UK satisfy the need of 1 year life in foreign environment.
For GMAP at FSLD 8 years of work-ex is listed as "required" whereas for LLM and MA (L & D), it is stated as "recommended", which indicates that there can be departure from the said requirements.
I know the post is already too long, but I would like to know whether I stand any chance or should I wait for a couple of years after my LLM in UK before going for FSLD.
Also, I would like to know about the availability of funding at FSLD and the amount (Max and Min) which they find favourable to grant.
If by chance, your answer is that I lack the professional experience for FSLD, could it be that a PHD in law after LLM in UK could satisfy the requirements of work-ex.
I hope you can take the pains to answer all the queries in detail.
Thanks once again.
Dear Rafeal Lima,
At the outset I must thank you on behalf of every reader for the insightful knowledge that you are sharing here. I would like to ask this one question. I know that being an LLM student yourself, you might not be in the right position to answer my query, but I would be highly obliged if you could base your response on the profiles of various students who are taking LLM along with you.
I have been quite interested in the MA (Law & Diplomacy) and LLM (Int. Law) at Fletcher SLD. My concern is with regards to the "relevant work experience" column which states 1-2 and 3-5 years repectively for both the programmes. It also states that work as intern shall be taken into account. It also states that min. 1 year of international experience is required.
Now, I have completed LLB in India with the requisite qualifications for FSLD. I have been interning continually over the past 3 years for a period that would amount to aroung 24 months. At the moment, I am not doing any work but reading for a prospective LLM in UK. I have been already accepted at Kings College London and would be taking up Tax/Corporate/Competition Laws (My applications are pending at LSE n Oxbridge so cant decide where I will end up taking LLM).
Do you think for FSLD, 2 years of certified work as an intern shall fulfill the need of work-ex. Also, would an LLM in UK satisfy the need of 1 year life in foreign environment.
For GMAP at FSLD 8 years of work-ex is listed as "required" whereas for LLM and MA (L & D), it is stated as "recommended", which indicates that there can be departure from the said requirements.
I know the post is already too long, but I would like to know whether I stand any chance or should I wait for a couple of years after my LLM in UK before going for FSLD.
Also, I would like to know about the availability of funding at FSLD and the amount (Max and Min) which they find favourable to grant.
If by chance, your answer is that I lack the professional experience for FSLD, could it be that a PHD in law after LLM in UK could satisfy the requirements of work-ex.
I hope you can take the pains to answer all the queries in detail.
Thanks once again.
quote
QSWE
If I could add two more questions:
1) the MALD requires GRE/Gmat but there is no indication as to the score required. Could you elaborate on this point?

2) Considering that I have a LLB and that by the time I get into FSLD, I would have an LLM, which would be a better option to pursue- LLM, MALD or PhD in a relevant field. I know the answer is subjective and should be left to the person concerned but I would like a dispassionate opinion from a person involved in the process. I mean, is there any benefit in taking a 2nd LLM (though the fields covered would be substantially different). Is MALD substantially different from LLM (does it justify the extra one year)? Considering I may like to combine knowledge in tax, finance gained through 1st LLM with knowledge in International Law (LLM) or Diplomacy (MALD), which one might make a better combination for someone whose career options totally negate practice of law in any form. I might like to end up in diplomacy, treasury, academia or research or even politics. Finally, rather than doing MALD and LLM, would it be worth starting a PhD, if I were to complete International affairs/ International Politics/ External relations of EU as the fourth subjects in LLM.
If I could add two more questions:
1) the MALD requires GRE/Gmat but there is no indication as to the score required. Could you elaborate on this point?

2) Considering that I have a LLB and that by the time I get into FSLD, I would have an LLM, which would be a better option to pursue- LLM, MALD or PhD in a relevant field. I know the answer is subjective and should be left to the person concerned but I would like a dispassionate opinion from a person involved in the process. I mean, is there any benefit in taking a 2nd LLM (though the fields covered would be substantially different). Is MALD substantially different from LLM (does it justify the extra one year)? Considering I may like to combine knowledge in tax, finance gained through 1st LLM with knowledge in International Law (LLM) or Diplomacy (MALD), which one might make a better combination for someone whose career options totally negate practice of law in any form. I might like to end up in diplomacy, treasury, academia or research or even politics. Finally, rather than doing MALD and LLM, would it be worth starting a PhD, if I were to complete International affairs/ International Politics/ External relations of EU as the fourth subjects in LLM.
quote
Jagsmehn,

Some of your querries are beyond my current knowledge!

Still, I will try to answer them:

Be aware that I am doing the LLM program, therefore I can answer about it. My current knowledge about GMAT, MALD and PHD come from my daily contact with students of these programs.

1) The profile of the students in my program is really diverse. It seems that they (Admission Team to which I have absolutely no contact) focus on working professionals that intend to take an year out for gaining knowledge. But, we do have students with about 2 years of working experience (including internship).

2) International Experience seems to be very important. The Fletcher environment requires that. If you be luck to live an year here, you will see that spendind time abroad is a commonality. The LLM in the UK would be taken into consideration for sure.

3) It is always worthwhile to consider other programs. The MALD, GMAT, PHD are all fantastic. But, they all have significant differences. You need to define your desires and meet them with the right program. Be aware that doing two LL.ms do not affect your profile whatsoever. You must combine them in a wise way. I did that myself...

4) Funding is possible. You may find that in your home country or be lucky to receive some support from the University. You need to structure your application stressing your qualities in a way to catch their attention. These guys often see thousand of great students, you need to have something unique.

Hope it helps!

See ya,

R
Jagsmehn,

Some of your querries are beyond my current knowledge!

Still, I will try to answer them:

Be aware that I am doing the LLM program, therefore I can answer about it. My current knowledge about GMAT, MALD and PHD come from my daily contact with students of these programs.

1) The profile of the students in my program is really diverse. It seems that they (Admission Team to which I have absolutely no contact) focus on working professionals that intend to take an year out for gaining knowledge. But, we do have students with about 2 years of working experience (including internship).

2) International Experience seems to be very important. The Fletcher environment requires that. If you be luck to live an year here, you will see that spendind time abroad is a commonality. The LLM in the UK would be taken into consideration for sure.

3) It is always worthwhile to consider other programs. The MALD, GMAT, PHD are all fantastic. But, they all have significant differences. You need to define your desires and meet them with the right program. Be aware that doing two LL.ms do not affect your profile whatsoever. You must combine them in a wise way. I did that myself...

4) Funding is possible. You may find that in your home country or be lucky to receive some support from the University. You need to structure your application stressing your qualities in a way to catch their attention. These guys often see thousand of great students, you need to have something unique.

Hope it helps!

See ya,

R

quote
EBLK
Hi All,
I'm also an LL.M. student at Fletcher, and happy to answer any questions. It's a great program!

Elizabeth
Hi All,
I'm also an LL.M. student at Fletcher, and happy to answer any questions. It's a great program!

Elizabeth
quote
fajats
to Rafael or EBLK

First I want to thank you both for giving us a chance to clear some doubts by speaking (posting) with an actual student of the FSLD.

Second: Do you think that the LLM at FSLD can be compared with the Masters in International Dispute Settlement from Geneva University? From a glance, both programs look like they can be focused in the same area of international law (PIB); Have you heard of this program?

Third: regarding the exclusivity rumors of the FLSD, which more than rumors look like an actual fact, is there any special criteria in which the admissions board focuses on?, should we strengthen our resume by spending what little time we have left (I intend to apply for august 2010) in a specific area that may gives us an edge in the admissions process?

fourth: LOL, I think those two questions are enough, just wanted to thank you again.

Good luck to all
to Rafael or EBLK

First I want to thank you both for giving us a chance to clear some doubts by speaking (posting) with an actual student of the FSLD.

Second: Do you think that the LLM at FSLD can be compared with the Masters in International Dispute Settlement from Geneva University? From a glance, both programs look like they can be focused in the same area of international law (PIB); Have you heard of this program?

Third: regarding the exclusivity rumors of the FLSD, which more than rumors look like an actual fact, is there any special criteria in which the admissions board focuses on?, should we strengthen our resume by spending what little time we have left (I intend to apply for august 2010) in a specific area that may gives us an edge in the admissions process?

fourth: LOL, I think those two questions are enough, just wanted to thank you again.

Good luck to all
quote
fajats
by the way, Rafael, are you from Latin America? if so, which country? I'm from Mexico.
by the way, Rafael, are you from Latin America? if so, which country? I'm from Mexico.
quote
Hi Fajats!

I am from Latin America (Brazil)!

The LL.M. is indeed exclusive and very demanding. Geneva is a sister school if I am not wrong, but these programs are somehow different.

The great deal of the Fletcher School is the possibility to observe events and study topics from different standpoints. The school has an outstanding Law Faculty, but it also has an amazing diplomacy and an economic department. Hence, you get the unique chance of sitting for classes whose major focus is not only the law, but maybe the effects of a certain policy in the international environment. This perspective certainly helped me to broaden my horizons.

Nevertheless, if you want to have a strict legalist view of international law (PIL), it is definitely possible. It is up to you deciding the classes you want to take. The LL.M degree requirements are very flexible.

Finally, I can't say what the admissions team look for in an applicant. It is definitely out of my area of expertise. Still, an outstanding academic record, a great SofP and practical experience are certainly desirable.

Sorte!!!

Rafael
Hi Fajats!

I am from Latin America (Brazil)!

The LL.M. is indeed exclusive and very demanding. Geneva is a sister school if I am not wrong, but these programs are somehow different.

The great deal of the Fletcher School is the possibility to observe events and study topics from different standpoints. The school has an outstanding Law Faculty, but it also has an amazing diplomacy and an economic department. Hence, you get the unique chance of sitting for classes whose major focus is not only the law, but maybe the effects of a certain policy in the international environment. This perspective certainly helped me to broaden my horizons.

Nevertheless, if you want to have a strict legalist view of international law (PIL), it is definitely possible. It is up to you deciding the classes you want to take. The LL.M degree requirements are very flexible.

Finally, I can't say what the admissions team look for in an applicant. It is definitely out of my area of expertise. Still, an outstanding academic record, a great SofP and practical experience are certainly desirable.

Sorte!!!

Rafael


quote
fajats
Rafael,

Muito obrigado, that was really helpful, all I need to do know is start saving, look for scholarships and gather all the necessary documents.

Again thanks for your time.

Juan
Rafael,

Muito obrigado, that was really helpful, all I need to do know is start saving, look for scholarships and gather all the necessary documents.

Again thanks for your time.

Juan

quote
Hi
I have couple of questions..

I am interested in the MALD program
1. Is there any group like this (LLM) for MALD program as well?
2. What is the average GRE/GMAT score for the MALD program?
3. I am a software engineer with 3 years of industry experience and want to switch career to International relations. Would this be an obstacle?

Thanks in Advance..
Hi
I have couple of questions..

I am interested in the MALD program
1. Is there any group like this (LLM) for MALD program as well?
2. What is the average GRE/GMAT score for the MALD program?
3. I am a software engineer with 3 years of industry experience and want to switch career to International relations. Would this be an obstacle?

Thanks in Advance..
quote
ipilar
Hi, I think it would be easiest if you contact Fletcher directly about MALD questions as there won't be anyone here who can speak to it.
Hi, I think it would be easiest if you contact Fletcher directly about MALD questions as there won't be anyone here who can speak to it.

quote
Hi Rafael,
I must confess that I had not thought about The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, but after reading your posts and comments and looking over the school profile, I have come to admire Fletcher a great deal!
I have one question though, does Fletcher prepare LL.M. students for the Bar exams? My ultimate goal is to be a law professor but I think qualifying to practice in the jurisdiction where you studied or plan to teach is important.
Thanks!
E.R
Hi Rafael,
I must confess that I had not thought about The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, but after reading your posts and comments and looking over the school profile, I have come to admire Fletcher a great deal!
I have one question though, does Fletcher prepare LL.M. students for the Bar exams? My ultimate goal is to be a law professor but I think qualifying to practice in the jurisdiction where you studied or plan to teach is important.
Thanks!
E.R
quote
As far as I know, a school that is not accredited by the ABA does not qualify you for the bar exam.

I was wondering what the advantage or the reason behind having to take non-law classes at the Fletcher LL.M. program. I know what area I want to study and I think a better use of my time at Fletcher would be taking additional law classes.

What was your opinion of the additional 3 non-law classes. Do you think that the non-law classes were a benefit?
As far as I know, a school that is not accredited by the ABA does not qualify you for the bar exam.

I was wondering what the advantage or the reason behind having to take non-law classes at the Fletcher LL.M. program. I know what area I want to study and I think a better use of my time at Fletcher would be taking additional law classes.

What was your opinion of the additional 3 non-law classes. Do you think that the non-law classes were a benefit?
quote
ipilar
Hi, eligibility for the bar is determined separately in each state in the U.S.; most states require a JD degree although a few allow foreign attorneys to take the bar if they have LLM or similar degrees. This is often done on a case by case basis. Fletcher is not a law school, and is therefore non-ABA accredited so in general it would not fulfill the requirements for state bars. One could take some courses through cross-registration while at Fletcher that might count towards the bar requirements but Fletcher officially does not make any representations as to its graduates being able to take the bar exam in any US jurisdictions. For people wishing to enter academics, it is my opinion that bar admission is generally unimportant but that is largely a question of personal preference.

Oncesurreal-- this is also a question of personal preference. Fletcher prides itself on being multid-disciplinary so the requirement to take courses across all three baskets (Inter Legal Organizations or ILO, Economics and International Business or EIB, and Diplomacy, History and Politics or DHP) is part of the School's culture. While I can relate to your feeling that if you have a very targeted interest you might feel you would only like to take ILO courses, for example, the reality is that cross-border and cross-boundary work is the norm today. Of course, some courses can fit into more than one stream (international negotiation, for example) and I would also add that sometimes one is surprised how relevant other subjects are to one's interests. For example, a knowledge of microfinance can be extremely useful if you are interested in issues related to law and development. Part of what makes Fletcher unique is also that classes are open to everyone (subject to occasional prereqs) and unlike law school you will be taking courses with people from a very wide variety of backgrounds and interests. Personally, I have found that taking a class in ILO and having economists, historians, diplomats, human rights practitioners, and others in addition to lawyers adds a whole new dimension to class discussions. It's definitely different, and that's part of what makes Fletcher a good fit for some people -- but I would say the culture is quite a departure from your "typical" law school. Like everything, that makes it a perfect fit for some, and a bad choice for others. Hope this helps.
Hi, eligibility for the bar is determined separately in each state in the U.S.; most states require a JD degree although a few allow foreign attorneys to take the bar if they have LLM or similar degrees. This is often done on a case by case basis. Fletcher is not a law school, and is therefore non-ABA accredited so in general it would not fulfill the requirements for state bars. One could take some courses through cross-registration while at Fletcher that might count towards the bar requirements but Fletcher officially does not make any representations as to its graduates being able to take the bar exam in any US jurisdictions. For people wishing to enter academics, it is my opinion that bar admission is generally unimportant but that is largely a question of personal preference.

Oncesurreal-- this is also a question of personal preference. Fletcher prides itself on being multid-disciplinary so the requirement to take courses across all three baskets (Inter Legal Organizations or ILO, Economics and International Business or EIB, and Diplomacy, History and Politics or DHP) is part of the School's culture. While I can relate to your feeling that if you have a very targeted interest you might feel you would only like to take ILO courses, for example, the reality is that cross-border and cross-boundary work is the norm today. Of course, some courses can fit into more than one stream (international negotiation, for example) and I would also add that sometimes one is surprised how relevant other subjects are to one's interests. For example, a knowledge of microfinance can be extremely useful if you are interested in issues related to law and development. Part of what makes Fletcher unique is also that classes are open to everyone (subject to occasional prereqs) and unlike law school you will be taking courses with people from a very wide variety of backgrounds and interests. Personally, I have found that taking a class in ILO and having economists, historians, diplomats, human rights practitioners, and others in addition to lawyers adds a whole new dimension to class discussions. It's definitely different, and that's part of what makes Fletcher a good fit for some people -- but I would say the culture is quite a departure from your "typical" law school. Like everything, that makes it a perfect fit for some, and a bad choice for others. Hope this helps.
quote
Please i want to know more about International Law And Diplomacy
Please i want to know more about International Law And Diplomacy
quote
ipilar
Please visit our website, or post any specific questions you have and one of our students will be happy to respond!
Please visit our website, or post any specific questions you have and one of our students will be happy to respond!
quote

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