relevance of grades in second degree program


Ralph Wigg...

Dear all,

After graduating from law school three years ago (top of class), I began to study for a second degree (a four-year Master's degree program named 'Business and Economics'). One year ago, I started to work as a full-time researcher and lecturer (in law) at university (some publications). I am also reading for a PhD in law since then. However, as you may imagine, studying for a second degree besides my full-time job at the law school is a tough job. This gives way to the possibility that my grades in this second degree programm will possibly be not that brilliant, but only average. I am wondering, regarding my "dual burden" of working full-time and studying, whether average grades in my second degree program could reduce my chances of getting admitted to top LLM-programs in the US or in the UK. Shouldn't a second degree, even one passed with average grades, always be regarded as a plus factor?

Your opinion is highly appreciated. Many thanks

Dear all,

After graduating from law school three years ago (top of class), I began to study for a second degree (a four-year Master's degree program named 'Business and Economics'). One year ago, I started to work as a full-time researcher and lecturer (in law) at university (some publications). I am also reading for a PhD in law since then. However, as you may imagine, studying for a second degree besides my full-time job at the law school is a tough job. This gives way to the possibility that my grades in this second degree programm will possibly be not that brilliant, but only average. I am wondering, regarding my "dual burden" of working full-time and studying, whether average grades in my second degree program could reduce my chances of getting admitted to top LLM-programs in the US or in the UK. Shouldn't a second degree, even one passed with average grades, always be regarded as a plus factor?

Your opinion is highly appreciated. Many thanks
quote
Ralph Wigg...

Does anyone have an idea / opinion / experience in this respect?

Does anyone have an idea / opinion / experience in this respect?
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Ralph Wigg...

Is there somebody out there?

Is there somebody out there?
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TwelfthMon...

Nobody can and will give you a definite answer, as it's all speculations. My common sense tells me that applicant X with excellent grades and no additional education is less impressive than applicant Y with excellent grades and an additonal - albeit "less successful"- academic performance. Try to look at it as an "extracurricular activity" on top your your law degree. Does somebody care about the actualy quality of these activities? I don't think so.

Nobody can and will give you a definite answer, as it's all speculations. My common sense tells me that applicant X with excellent grades and no additional education is less impressive than applicant Y with excellent grades and an additonal - albeit "less successful"- academic performance. Try to look at it as an "extracurricular activity" on top your your law degree. Does somebody care about the actualy quality of these activities? I don't think so.
quote
Ralph Wigg...

Nobody can and will give you a definite answer, as it's all speculations. My common sense tells me that applicant X with excellent grades and no additional education is less impressive than applicant Y with excellent grades and an additonal - albeit "less successful"- academic performance. Try to look at it as an "extracurricular activity" on top your your law degree. Does somebody care about the actualy quality of these activities? I don't think so.


Many thanks for posting your opinion. It's highly appreciated. However, I have doubts whether it is really adequate to equalize a second, successfully completed university degree with any 'extracurricular activity'. Harvard Law School's website, for example, states the following: 'In evaluating applications, the Committee takes into consideration the applicant's grades and rank in his or her law and other university studies. ...' The question remains, however, how strongly this applies to 'other university studies'?

<blockquote>Nobody can and will give you a definite answer, as it's all speculations. My common sense tells me that applicant X with excellent grades and no additional education is less impressive than applicant Y with excellent grades and an additonal - albeit "less successful"- academic performance. Try to look at it as an "extracurricular activity" on top your your law degree. Does somebody care about the actualy quality of these activities? I don't think so. </blockquote>

Many thanks for posting your opinion. It's highly appreciated. However, I have doubts whether it is really adequate to equalize a second, successfully completed university degree with any 'extracurricular activity'. Harvard Law School's website, for example, states the following: 'In evaluating applications, the Committee takes into consideration the applicant's grades and rank in his or her law and other university studies. ...' The question remains, however, how strongly this applies to 'other university studies'?
quote
TwelfthMon...

Well, Harvard is Harvard (shocking, I know). At the end of the day you're applying to a legal educational program. Clearly your previous academic performance in this very field is the most important evaluation factor and indication for future success at the university at hand. If you have an excellent record at your law school and can selfconfidently refer to your second degree more as a bonus complementing you, rather than something you need to be ashamed of or justify (after all, thats what personal satements are for), I don't see any problems at all.

Well, Harvard is Harvard (shocking, I know). At the end of the day you're applying to a legal educational program. Clearly your previous academic performance in this very field is the most important evaluation factor and indication for future success at the university at hand. If you have an excellent record at your law school and can selfconfidently refer to your second degree more as a bonus complementing you, rather than something you need to be ashamed of or justify (after all, thats what personal satements are for), I don't see any problems at all.
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Gregor2009

I agree with TwelfthMonkey. IN MY OPINION, your second degree in economics would probably be taken into account but most of the weight will be given to your legal studies where it will speak highly of whether you are going to be successful in your LLM studies (which I dont should be a problem).

Similar to job interviews, I am sure the committee will notice that you are studying and working at the same time etc so less emphasis may be placed on your additional studies.

Cheers,
Greg

I agree with TwelfthMonkey. IN MY OPINION, your second degree in economics would probably be taken into account but most of the weight will be given to your legal studies where it will speak highly of whether you are going to be successful in your LLM studies (which I dont should be a problem).

Similar to job interviews, I am sure the committee will notice that you are studying and working at the same time etc so less emphasis may be placed on your additional studies.

Cheers,
Greg
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Ralph Wigg...

Many thanks for posting your opinions!

So far, I have the impression that people tend to attach rather little value to a second degree. However, as I am studying for an additional degree in a field (business and economics) that is, after all, relevant to lawyers dealing with business or competition law (which I plan to do) - couldn't this be regarded rather as a considerable advantage in the application process?

Many thanks for posting your opinions!

So far, I have the impression that people tend to attach rather little value to a second degree. However, as I am studying for an additional degree in a field (business and economics) that is, after all, relevant to lawyers dealing with business or competition law (which I plan to do) - couldn't this be regarded rather as a considerable advantage in the application process?
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Gregor2009

Hello Chief Wiggum,

I would think it would be considered an advantage but the key emphasis would be on your law degree. I personally have several masters, with good results, and I think it would just give me an 'advantage', not 'considerable advantage'.

Of course, if your grades is spectular in all your studies then perhaps it would add more value to your application.

Which universities are you applying to?


Cheers,
G

Hello Chief Wiggum,

I would think it would be considered an advantage but the key emphasis would be on your law degree. I personally have several masters, with good results, and I think it would just give me an 'advantage', not 'considerable advantage'.

Of course, if your grades is spectular in all your studies then perhaps it would add more value to your application.

Which universities are you applying to?


Cheers,
G
quote
Ralph Wigg...

Hello Chief Wiggum,

I would think it would be considered an advantage but the key emphasis would be on your law degree. I personally have several masters, with good results, and I think it would just give me an 'advantage', not 'considerable advantage'.

Of course, if your grades is spectular in all your studies then perhaps it would add more value to your application.

Which universities are you applying to?


Cheers,
G



Dear Gregor2008,

Many thanks for posting your opinion. I haven't applied to any universities yet. I plan to apply next year or in two years maybe. First, I want to complete my economics degree and possibly my PhD in law. Only after that, I will make up mind about which law school would be most appropriate and attractive to me.

Best,
Chief Wiggum

<blockquote>Hello Chief Wiggum,

I would think it would be considered an advantage but the key emphasis would be on your law degree. I personally have several masters, with good results, and I think it would just give me an 'advantage', not 'considerable advantage'.

Of course, if your grades is spectular in all your studies then perhaps it would add more value to your application.

Which universities are you applying to?


Cheers,
G</blockquote>


Dear Gregor2008,

Many thanks for posting your opinion. I haven't applied to any universities yet. I plan to apply next year or in two years maybe. First, I want to complete my economics degree and possibly my PhD in law. Only after that, I will make up mind about which law school would be most appropriate and attractive to me.

Best,
Chief Wiggum
quote

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