opportunities for foreign students in JD programs in US


I understand that this board is mostly for foreign students who have their basic law degree from their respective countries and are now interested in pursuing an LLM degree at a US law school. From what little research I have done, they face tough problems finding a job after the completion of their LLMs because most US law firms do not recognize anyone without a JD from US law schools and career centers at most law schools do not allow these foreign LLMs to participate in on-campus interviews.

However, I am a foreign citizen (India) interested in pursuing a JD at a US law school and here is my question:

What about somone who is a citizen of a different country but has got a JD from a US law school?

(1). What are his/her chances in getting a job at the end of the JD program? (I am talking about ALL types of job - conventional big/mid-size/small US law firms, public organizations in US - American or International, I understand that due to citizenship requirements such a person will be ineligible for any job positions in the US Federal or State Govt)

(2). And also will there be any restrictions on him/her being eligible to sit for bar exam in any of the states?

Thanks and will appreciate any helpful response...

I understand that this board is mostly for foreign students who have their basic law degree from their respective countries and are now interested in pursuing an LLM degree at a US law school. From what little research I have done, they face tough problems finding a job after the completion of their LLMs because most US law firms do not recognize anyone without a JD from US law schools and career centers at most law schools do not allow these foreign LLMs to participate in on-campus interviews.

However, I am a foreign citizen (India) interested in pursuing a JD at a US law school and here is my question:

What about somone who is a citizen of a different country but has got a JD from a US law school?

(1). What are his/her chances in getting a job at the end of the JD program? (I am talking about ALL types of job - conventional big/mid-size/small US law firms, public organizations in US - American or International, I understand that due to citizenship requirements such a person will be ineligible for any job positions in the US Federal or State Govt)

(2). And also will there be any restrictions on him/her being eligible to sit for bar exam in any of the states?

Thanks and will appreciate any helpful response...
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well???
well???
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acr
Well?? Ok, I'll answer.

Your chances after a JD are the same that an American JD would have. The only limitations that I can think of are the absence of contacts (which are not as important as in other countries), language profficiency and citizenship for some federal jobs. I know several foreign JD working for big law firms in NY (from Ecuador, Dominican Rep., Canada, Mexico, Austria). Actually, I have known some partners that did not born in the US and did their JD in the US.
As far as I know, there are no restrictions for the bar based on nationality.
Obviously, just like any other JD, if you want a job in one of the big NY or DC law firms, you should have a JD in a 1st tier law school and have really good grades (at least during the 1st year).
Well?? Ok, I'll answer.

Your chances after a JD are the same that an American JD would have. The only limitations that I can think of are the absence of contacts (which are not as important as in other countries), language profficiency and citizenship for some federal jobs. I know several foreign JD working for big law firms in NY (from Ecuador, Dominican Rep., Canada, Mexico, Austria). Actually, I have known some partners that did not born in the US and did their JD in the US.
As far as I know, there are no restrictions for the bar based on nationality.
Obviously, just like any other JD, if you want a job in one of the big NY or DC law firms, you should have a JD in a 1st tier law school and have really good grades (at least during the 1st year).
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gkh_2005
Well if you are able to shell out about $15,000(Tuiton + living expenses), you can try doing ur J.D. in U.S. I believe it would be out of reach for an average Indian Student.
Well if you are able to shell out about $15,000(Tuiton + living expenses), you can try doing ur J.D. in U.S. I believe it would be out of reach for an average Indian Student.

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gkh_2005
I am currently doing a LL.M from Southern Methodist University and the total cost of doing this program is close $45,000
I am currently doing a LL.M from Southern Methodist University and the total cost of doing this program is close $45,000
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ipforme
Your chances of getting a job in the US are much much MUCH better if you earn a JD from an ABA American law school, than just doing a LLM program in the U.S. That being said, you MUST go to a tier 1 school, preferably in the top 20-30, if you want any shot at jobs at a big firm, and/or jobs in popular cities (New York, Boston, San Francisco, Los Angeles, etc.)

You also must get excellent grades, and it is stellar to have law review or moot court (where you are chosen, not when just anyone can participate) also. But you may face some obstacles still....some American firms may not think you will stay in the US permanently, or some may not want to deal with the process of sponsoring your work visa/papers, and sad to say, you may experience some employers who just prefer to hire Americans over foreigners.

Keep in mind cost too. I did my JD at a top 20 law school in the US (I'm American) and it cost me almost $150,000 ($48,000 per year, about $26,000 was tuition and fees, the rest was for living expenses). I am now doing my LLM at NYU and this 1 year program is costing me about $65,000 total. Yes it's crazy. No, there's not much you can do about it. You can keep costs down some by attending a public law school, but you'll still have to pay out of state tution for at least the first year. Public law schools do cost a little less than private ones though. But then again, you still need to be accepted to a top tier public law school in order to get the price break. Good luck.
Your chances of getting a job in the US are much much MUCH better if you earn a JD from an ABA American law school, than just doing a LLM program in the U.S. That being said, you MUST go to a tier 1 school, preferably in the top 20-30, if you want any shot at jobs at a big firm, and/or jobs in popular cities (New York, Boston, San Francisco, Los Angeles, etc.)

You also must get excellent grades, and it is stellar to have law review or moot court (where you are chosen, not when just anyone can participate) also. But you may face some obstacles still....some American firms may not think you will stay in the US permanently, or some may not want to deal with the process of sponsoring your work visa/papers, and sad to say, you may experience some employers who just prefer to hire Americans over foreigners.

Keep in mind cost too. I did my JD at a top 20 law school in the US (I'm American) and it cost me almost $150,000 ($48,000 per year, about $26,000 was tuition and fees, the rest was for living expenses). I am now doing my LLM at NYU and this 1 year program is costing me about $65,000 total. Yes it's crazy. No, there's not much you can do about it. You can keep costs down some by attending a public law school, but you'll still have to pay out of state tution for at least the first year. Public law schools do cost a little less than private ones though. But then again, you still need to be accepted to a top tier public law school in order to get the price break. Good luck.
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That said, it's still not easy.

I obtained a JD from a first-tier law school (top 20-30), competed to get onto Moot Court, received Moot Court honors thereafter, obtained top 40% class ranking, speak foreign languages, and have a law degree and license from my own country (UK).

While at law school I landed over a dozen on-campus interviews with top-tier Cal and NY firms my 2L fall semester. However, not one of them bore fruit (even though I got good feedback from my interviewers who said I shouldn't have a problem getting work at a reputable firm). I suspect it was because of my non-traditional i.e. dual-qualification background and British accent etc.

So, I spent my second summer doing an unpaid internship with the prosecutors office. I eventually found a job just after sitting the bar exam - I'm still at the same firm 3 years later earning less than $30,000 and have been unable to obtain any interviews with decent firms since then.
That said, it's still not easy.

I obtained a JD from a first-tier law school (top 20-30), competed to get onto Moot Court, received Moot Court honors thereafter, obtained top 40% class ranking, speak foreign languages, and have a law degree and license from my own country (UK).

While at law school I landed over a dozen on-campus interviews with top-tier Cal and NY firms my 2L fall semester. However, not one of them bore fruit (even though I got good feedback from my interviewers who said I shouldn't have a problem getting work at a reputable firm). I suspect it was because of my non-traditional i.e. dual-qualification background and British accent etc.

So, I spent my second summer doing an unpaid internship with the prosecutors office. I eventually found a job just after sitting the bar exam - I'm still at the same firm 3 years later earning less than $30,000 and have been unable to obtain any interviews with decent firms since then.
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