LLM in Corporation Law 2020-2021 Class


edx
Hi,

I'm interested in applying for NYU's LLM program in Corporation Law. Does this program better help graduates get jobs in corporate law firms in New York city, over and above graduates from the traditional LLM program?
Hi,

I'm interested in applying for NYU's LLM program in Corporation Law. Does this program better help graduates get jobs in corporate law firms in New York city, over and above graduates from the traditional LLM program?
quote
Clark 804
As an LLM—any LLM—would not qualify you to work as an attorney in the US, I doubt it.

Are you already a permanent resident in the US? Have you passed the New York bar exam?
As an LLM—any LLM—would not qualify you to work as an attorney in the US, I doubt it.

Are you already a permanent resident in the US? Have you passed the New York bar exam?
quote
I think the question infers that the LLM student would have passed the BAR and is a permanent resident...I am thinking of applying to an LLm in Corporation Law as well. I am a US Citizen, but I went to Law School in Brazil. Since I didn't wnat to go through the whole law school again, would it be worth it to just do an LLM, pass the BAR and try to get a job? Should I just do a JD (I am a little scared of the LSAT)?
I think the question infers that the LLM student would have passed the BAR and is a permanent resident...I am thinking of applying to an LLm in Corporation Law as well. I am a US Citizen, but I went to Law School in Brazil. Since I didn't wnat to go through the whole law school again, would it be worth it to just do an LLM, pass the BAR and try to get a job? Should I just do a JD (I am a little scared of the LSAT)?
quote
edx
As an LLM—any LLM—would not qualify you to work as an attorney in the US, I doubt it.

Are you already a permanent resident in the US? Have you passed the New York bar exam?


Nope, neither a permanent resident of the US, nor have I passed the NY Bar. What I meant is - are there opportunities (scarce but available nonetheless) for LLM graduates from NYU's Corporation Law course.
[quote]As an LLM—any LLM—would not qualify you to work as an attorney in the US, I doubt it.

Are you already a permanent resident in the US? Have you passed the New York bar exam? [/quote]

Nope, neither a permanent resident of the US, nor have I passed the NY Bar. What I meant is - are there opportunities (scarce but available nonetheless) for LLM graduates from NYU's Corporation Law course.
quote
chicken so...
What did you have in mind? As a non-permanent resident, you would be eligible for an OPT visa after you finished the LLM, where you get 12 months in the country with the ability to work.

Maybe you can find *something*, but due to the uncertainty of the situation - after the 12 month you'd need to have an employer sponsor your H1B visa, which is awarded by lottery - many employers might not think that it's worth the risk.

A good bet might be, if you have experience practicing law in your home country, trying to consult with a law firm or organization who does work in your country.
What did you have in mind? As a non-permanent resident, you would be eligible for an OPT visa after you finished the LLM, where you get 12 months in the country with the ability to work.

Maybe you can find *something*, but due to the uncertainty of the situation - after the 12 month you'd need to have an employer sponsor your H1B visa, which is awarded by lottery - many employers might not think that it's worth the risk.

A good bet might be, if you have experience practicing law in your home country, trying to consult with a law firm or organization who does work in your country.
quote
edx
What did you have in mind? As a non-permanent resident, you would be eligible for an OPT visa after you finished the LLM, where you get 12 months in the country with the ability to work.

Maybe you can find *something*, but due to the uncertainty of the situation - after the 12 month you'd need to have an employer sponsor your H1B visa, which is awarded by lottery - many employers might not think that it's worth the risk.

A good bet might be, if you have experience practicing law in your home country, trying to consult with a law firm or organization who does work in your country.


Thanks, the info on sponsoring a H1B visa was quite helpful. Will talk it out with organisations in my home country.
[quote]What did you have in mind? As a non-permanent resident, you would be eligible for an OPT visa after you finished the LLM, where you get 12 months in the country with the ability to work.

Maybe you can find *something*, but due to the uncertainty of the situation - after the 12 month you'd need to have an employer sponsor your H1B visa, which is awarded by lottery - many employers might not think that it's worth the risk.

A good bet might be, if you have experience practicing law in your home country, trying to consult with a law firm or organization who does work in your country.[/quote]

Thanks, the info on sponsoring a H1B visa was quite helpful. Will talk it out with organisations in my home country.
quote
srs594
Hi,

I'm interested in applying for NYU's LLM program in Corporation Law. Does this program better help graduates get jobs in corporate law firms in New York city, over and above graduates from the traditional LLM program?


I'm in the Corporation Law LLM program this year and it doesn't appear as if employers have any specific leaning towards the Corporation Law LLM as compared to the Traditional LLM. There are people in the Traditional LLM program that have taken subjects falling within the broad ambit of corporate law as well. Ultimately, the degree specification in the US doesn't have a bearing on your job opportunities. Tying back to the LLM specialisation point, I've seen many candidates with the Traditional LLM landing more interviews/job offers mostly because the decision to hire you depends largely on your language skills, prior experience, country of first legal education, citizenship/residency status, etc. It doesn't appear to me as if the specialisation has any specific bearing on your employability.

Employment opportunities are fairly scarce here if you aren't from certain countries. There's a demand for lawyers from Brazil, Mexico and other Latin American countries, mostly because a lot of legal work from those countries is routed through American law firms, and also because some law firms require native Spanish/Portuguese speakers to cater to their Latin American and European markets. If you're from India, it's very hard to break into the legal market (speaking as an Indian lawyer and a candidate for the LLM program myself) because too much India work is not routed through US law firms (as compared to Hong Kong or Singapore). So there is no real demand for Indian lawyers specifically in the US legal market, unfortunately.

The visa is another sore spot for candidates and employers alike, as it is expensive, unpredictable and is becoming especially difficult to obtain. If you do decide to come to the US, you should accept and be aware of the fact that the LLM is not a degree that will help you migrate or break into a new legal system. It is not a traditional degree to break into a new job market (unlike the MBA) so it is important to recognise the difference. You will get limited help and support from career services offices of your law school in this regard as well, as this is not a traditional degree that you can leverage to break into a good job market. You can try your best to network and build contacts within the legal fraternity of New York or any other state in which you intend to practice, but it will definitely be a significant barrier. Although, do keep in mind that some people have managed to break into the legal market here, although they are in the minority.

This, however, shouldn't discourage you from applying if the costs of the program + living expenses, opportunity cost of being unemployed, etc., are accepted by you. Regardless of the outcome at the end of the year, you will definitely have an intellectually stimulating, fruitful year ahead. Good luck!
[quote]Hi,

I'm interested in applying for NYU's LLM program in Corporation Law. Does this program better help graduates get jobs in corporate law firms in New York city, over and above graduates from the traditional LLM program?[/quote]

I'm in the Corporation Law LLM program this year and it doesn't appear as if employers have any specific leaning towards the Corporation Law LLM as compared to the Traditional LLM. There are people in the Traditional LLM program that have taken subjects falling within the broad ambit of corporate law as well. Ultimately, the degree specification in the US doesn't have a bearing on your job opportunities. Tying back to the LLM specialisation point, I've seen many candidates with the Traditional LLM landing more interviews/job offers mostly because the decision to hire you depends largely on your language skills, prior experience, country of first legal education, citizenship/residency status, etc. It doesn't appear to me as if the specialisation has any specific bearing on your employability.

Employment opportunities are fairly scarce here if you aren't from certain countries. There's a demand for lawyers from Brazil, Mexico and other Latin American countries, mostly because a lot of legal work from those countries is routed through American law firms, and also because some law firms require native Spanish/Portuguese speakers to cater to their Latin American and European markets. If you're from India, it's very hard to break into the legal market (speaking as an Indian lawyer and a candidate for the LLM program myself) because too much India work is not routed through US law firms (as compared to Hong Kong or Singapore). So there is no real demand for Indian lawyers specifically in the US legal market, unfortunately.

The visa is another sore spot for candidates and employers alike, as it is expensive, unpredictable and is becoming especially difficult to obtain. If you do decide to come to the US, you should accept and be aware of the fact that the LLM is not a degree that will help you migrate or break into a new legal system. It is not a traditional degree to break into a new job market (unlike the MBA) so it is important to recognise the difference. You will get limited help and support from career services offices of your law school in this regard as well, as this is not a traditional degree that you can leverage to break into a good job market. You can try your best to network and build contacts within the legal fraternity of New York or any other state in which you intend to practice, but it will definitely be a significant barrier. Although, do keep in mind that some people have managed to break into the legal market here, although they are in the minority.

This, however, shouldn't discourage you from applying if the costs of the program + living expenses, opportunity cost of being unemployed, etc., are accepted by you. Regardless of the outcome at the end of the year, you will definitely have an intellectually stimulating, fruitful year ahead. Good luck!
quote
chicken so...
If you do decide to come to the US, you should accept and be aware of the fact that the LLM is not a degree that will help you migrate or break into a new legal system. It is not a traditional degree to break into a new job market (unlike the MBA) so it is important to recognise the difference. You will get limited help and support from career services offices of your law school in this regard as well, as this is not a traditional degree that you can leverage to break into a good job market.

This is excellent advice. I think a lot of applicants come to US LLM programs with the expectation that they will help them make the transition to the US legal system. Although it does happen in some cases, the LLM is not specifically useful for international mobility.
[quote]If you do decide to come to the US, you should accept and be aware of the fact that the LLM is not a degree that will help you migrate or break into a new legal system. It is not a traditional degree to break into a new job market (unlike the MBA) so it is important to recognise the difference. You will get limited help and support from career services offices of your law school in this regard as well, as this is not a traditional degree that you can leverage to break into a good job market. [/quote]
This is excellent advice. I think a lot of applicants come to US LLM programs with the expectation that they will help them make the transition to the US legal system. Although it does happen in some cases, the LLM is not specifically useful for international mobility.
quote
edx
Hi,

I'm interested in applying for NYU's LLM program in Corporation Law. Does this program better help graduates get jobs in corporate law firms in New York city, over and above graduates from the traditional LLM program?


I'm in the Corporation Law LLM program this year and it doesn't appear as if employers have any specific leaning towards the Corporation Law LLM as compared to the Traditional LLM. There are people in the Traditional LLM program that have taken subjects falling within the broad ambit of corporate law as well. Ultimately, the degree specification in the US doesn't have a bearing on your job opportunities. Tying back to the LLM specialisation point, I've seen many candidates with the Traditional LLM landing more interviews/job offers mostly because the decision to hire you depends largely on your language skills, prior experience, country of first legal education, citizenship/residency status, etc. It doesn't appear to me as if the specialisation has any specific bearing on your employability.

Employment opportunities are fairly scarce here if you aren't from certain countries. There's a demand for lawyers from Brazil, Mexico and other Latin American countries, mostly because a lot of legal work from those countries is routed through American law firms, and also because some law firms require native Spanish/Portuguese speakers to cater to their Latin American and European markets. If you're from India, it's very hard to break into the legal market (speaking as an Indian lawyer and a candidate for the LLM program myself) because too much India work is not routed through US law firms (as compared to Hong Kong or Singapore). So there is no real demand for Indian lawyers specifically in the US legal market, unfortunately.

The visa is another sore spot for candidates and employers alike, as it is expensive, unpredictable and is becoming especially difficult to obtain. If you do decide to come to the US, you should accept and be aware of the fact that the LLM is not a degree that will help you migrate or break into a new legal system. It is not a traditional degree to break into a new job market (unlike the MBA) so it is important to recognise the difference. You will get limited help and support from career services offices of your law school in this regard as well, as this is not a traditional degree that you can leverage to break into a good job market. You can try your best to network and build contacts within the legal fraternity of New York or any other state in which you intend to practice, but it will definitely be a significant barrier. Although, do keep in mind that some people have managed to break into the legal market here, although they are in the minority.

This, however, shouldn't discourage you from applying if the costs of the program + living expenses, opportunity cost of being unemployed, etc., are accepted by you. Regardless of the outcome at the end of the year, you will definitely have an intellectually stimulating, fruitful year ahead. Good luck!


This was the kind of "spot-on" feedback that I was looking for. Thank you so much :).
[quote][quote]Hi,

I'm interested in applying for NYU's LLM program in Corporation Law. Does this program better help graduates get jobs in corporate law firms in New York city, over and above graduates from the traditional LLM program?[/quote]

I'm in the Corporation Law LLM program this year and it doesn't appear as if employers have any specific leaning towards the Corporation Law LLM as compared to the Traditional LLM. There are people in the Traditional LLM program that have taken subjects falling within the broad ambit of corporate law as well. Ultimately, the degree specification in the US doesn't have a bearing on your job opportunities. Tying back to the LLM specialisation point, I've seen many candidates with the Traditional LLM landing more interviews/job offers mostly because the decision to hire you depends largely on your language skills, prior experience, country of first legal education, citizenship/residency status, etc. It doesn't appear to me as if the specialisation has any specific bearing on your employability.

Employment opportunities are fairly scarce here if you aren't from certain countries. There's a demand for lawyers from Brazil, Mexico and other Latin American countries, mostly because a lot of legal work from those countries is routed through American law firms, and also because some law firms require native Spanish/Portuguese speakers to cater to their Latin American and European markets. If you're from India, it's very hard to break into the legal market (speaking as an Indian lawyer and a candidate for the LLM program myself) because too much India work is not routed through US law firms (as compared to Hong Kong or Singapore). So there is no real demand for Indian lawyers specifically in the US legal market, unfortunately.

The visa is another sore spot for candidates and employers alike, as it is expensive, unpredictable and is becoming especially difficult to obtain. If you do decide to come to the US, you should accept and be aware of the fact that the LLM is not a degree that will help you migrate or break into a new legal system. It is not a traditional degree to break into a new job market (unlike the MBA) so it is important to recognise the difference. You will get limited help and support from career services offices of your law school in this regard as well, as this is not a traditional degree that you can leverage to break into a good job market. You can try your best to network and build contacts within the legal fraternity of New York or any other state in which you intend to practice, but it will definitely be a significant barrier. Although, do keep in mind that some people have managed to break into the legal market here, although they are in the minority.

This, however, shouldn't discourage you from applying if the costs of the program + living expenses, opportunity cost of being unemployed, etc., are accepted by you. Regardless of the outcome at the end of the year, you will definitely have an intellectually stimulating, fruitful year ahead. Good luck![/quote]

This was the kind of "spot-on" feedback that I was looking for. Thank you so much :).
quote

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