Jobs after LLM


jo_rahul
LLM in IPR is a good option if ur a science or an engineering graduate. u have criminal experience. i think u should go for a general corporate or commercial law option rather than a narrow option like IPR.
LLM in IPR is a good option if ur a science or an engineering graduate. u have criminal experience. i think u should go for a general corporate or commercial law option rather than a narrow option like IPR.
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Well Thank's a lot jo_rahul for your reply to my post.
Intellectual property law or Trade marks and copy rights was one of my subjects for my {optional} for LLB in India . Moreover have heard that there is a good scope for IPR in California due to ample of IT companies . A part from that i feel that rather doing something in general IPR would be providing me with a specialization .
Well Thank's a lot jo_rahul for your reply to my post.
Intellectual property law or Trade marks and copy rights was one of my subjects for my {optional} for LLB in India . Moreover have heard that there is a good scope for IPR in California due to ample of IT companies . A part from that i feel that rather doing something in general IPR would be providing me with a specialization .
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york
US law school cut classes due to bad job market: http://biglaw.org/news/6745/51-of-us-law-schools-cut-size-of-incoming-classes
US law school cut classes due to bad job market: http://biglaw.org/news/6745/51-of-us-law-schools-cut-size-of-incoming-classes
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york
It definitely looks like the number of law school applicants (JD) is dropping:

http://biglaw.org/news/6748/lsat-figures-drop-by-16.4

I wonder whether the situation with LLM applications is similar.
It definitely looks like the number of law school applicants (JD) is dropping:

http://biglaw.org/news/6748/lsat-figures-drop-by-16.4

I wonder whether the situation with LLM applications is similar.
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Brainy Smu...
It is hilarious how non-US resident applicants believe they have a chance of employment within the borders of the US without a single,if any, connection. Attending top universities does not ensure a competitive advantage of employment. The US is an experience-base country. And if the only measure you have are exceptional marks/grades and little experience in the field of choice. Why would any LLC even bother considering your resume/CV?

Before applying to any US uni. Be certain to be flexible and passionate about what ought to be your primary objective. Because within the US, there are many people like yourself who are already there and are not employed or if they are employed, they are in the profession they do not desire.

So many variables to this enquiry.

It remains incomprehensible to non-US residents that good unis do not ensure employment. I am excited, like the next person, if you gain admittance. Once breaching the subjective matters that keep others out and freely being enable to access everything within the borders of an elitist uni. A student should come up with a strategy determining the aftermath of receiving their LLM. To make thyself marketable within the US. You are going to have to spend more time in the US acquiring a JD. After recognising that a LLM was not worth the 6 to 9 month effort. On the contrary, how often to you hear of LLMs being gainfully employed within the US at a fortune 500 company?

Whatever state in the US you set your aim on. Be certain to research their economy. Some US state's economies are better than others. Some of the better economies might be in states you have no recollection about or, possibly, have no interest in residing. That is the major fault of the US. You will have to compromise (conscious decision) with yourself. What will it be?

A good field. Those who are aware will tell you, Taxation/Tax Law. They are correct. You are moving to a capital driven country. Also look into other undesirable fields like Agriculture, Medical, and Maritime.
It is hilarious how non-US resident applicants believe they have a chance of employment within the borders of the US without a single,if any, connection. Attending top universities does not ensure a competitive advantage of employment. The US is an experience-base country. And if the only measure you have are exceptional marks/grades and little experience in the field of choice. Why would any LLC even bother considering your resume/CV?

Before applying to any US uni. Be certain to be flexible and passionate about what ought to be your primary objective. Because within the US, there are many people like yourself who are already there and are not employed or if they are employed, they are in the profession they do not desire.

So many variables to this enquiry.

It remains incomprehensible to non-US residents that good unis do not ensure employment. I am excited, like the next person, if you gain admittance. Once breaching the subjective matters that keep others out and freely being enable to access everything within the borders of an elitist uni. A student should come up with a strategy determining the aftermath of receiving their LLM. To make thyself marketable within the US. You are going to have to spend more time in the US acquiring a JD. After recognising that a LLM was not worth the 6 to 9 month effort. On the contrary, how often to you hear of LLMs being gainfully employed within the US at a fortune 500 company?

Whatever state in the US you set your aim on. Be certain to research their economy. Some US state's economies are better than others. Some of the better economies might be in states you have no recollection about or, possibly, have no interest in residing. That is the major fault of the US. You will have to compromise (conscious decision) with yourself. What will it be?

A good field. Those who are aware will tell you, Taxation/Tax Law. They are correct. You are moving to a capital driven country. Also look into other undesirable fields like Agriculture, Medical, and Maritime.
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hawkme
This is, by far, the best single piece of advice anyone will ever get should they think of landing a job in the US following the LLM.

:)
This is, by far, the best single piece of advice anyone will ever get should they think of landing a job in the US following the LLM.

:)
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york
The US job market for lawyers is still in a downward spiral:

US summer associate numbers drop, continuing a four year trend.
http://biglaw.org/news/6933/us-summer-associate-numbers-drop

The number of people applying to law school in the US is heading for a 30-year (!) low
http://biglaw.org/news/6913/law-school-application-numbers-head-south
The US job market for lawyers is still in a downward spiral:

US summer associate numbers drop, continuing a four year trend.
http://biglaw.org/news/6933/us-summer-associate-numbers-drop

The number of people applying to law school in the US is heading for a 30-year (!) low
http://biglaw.org/news/6913/law-school-application-numbers-head-south
quote
I'm reading that it's basically impossible to find a job for a foreign trained attorney post LLM.

What if you get a visa in the US (eg: getting married)?

Would that help? How much?

And what about it in 3/4 years from now, as the economy seems to get better in California ?
I'm reading that it's basically impossible to find a job for a foreign trained attorney post LLM.

What if you get a visa in the US (eg: getting married)?

Would that help? How much?

And what about it in 3/4 years from now, as the economy seems to get better in California ?
quote
NebNeb
I'm reading that it's basically impossible to find a job for a foreign trained attorney post LLM.

What if you get a visa in the US (eg: getting married)?

Would that help? How much?

And what about it in 3/4 years from now, as the economy seems to get better in California ?


I find it hard to believe that having a visa wedding or a visa baby would give you any foothold. Big law companies have resources to fix you a visa, they do not require you to have it. So don't waist your time on that. I might be wrong but none should be that desperate. There might be people on this forum that have the skill to see to the future and see what will be the economic situation in Cali in 4 years. However I wouldn't trust their insight. Just get good connections and a good plan B.
<blockquote>I'm reading that it's basically impossible to find a job for a foreign trained attorney post LLM.

What if you get a visa in the US (eg: getting married)?

Would that help? How much?

And what about it in 3/4 years from now, as the economy seems to get better in California ?</blockquote>

I find it hard to believe that having a visa wedding or a visa baby would give you any foothold. Big law companies have resources to fix you a visa, they do not require you to have it. So don't waist your time on that. I might be wrong but none should be that desperate. There might be people on this forum that have the skill to see to the future and see what will be the economic situation in Cali in 4 years. However I wouldn't trust their insight. Just get good connections and a good plan B.
quote
quote
york
Signs of recovery:

Big US law firms increase entry-level recruitment

http://biglaw.org/news/7984/biglaw-firms-increase-entry-level-recruitment
Signs of recovery:

Big US law firms increase entry-level recruitment

http://biglaw.org/news/7984/biglaw-firms-increase-entry-level-recruitment
quote
olivers
Signs of recovery:

Big US law firms increase entry-level recruitment

http://biglaw.org/news/7984/biglaw-firms-increase-entry-level-recruitment


As an LL.M. you can ignore that news. As a JD you will think, that is not true ...

Then read this:
http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2014/06/23/odds-improve-for-new-law-graduates-though-hiring-levels-remain-soft/

Exact opposite of this:

http://online.wsj.com/articles/big-law-firms-resume-hiring-1403477513

Both in WSJ. The hiring isn't up. Just news reports of doom and gloom are being suppressed. The other key is to notice, that they all suggest, it is going up. Not the number unemployed.

If you are an LL.M. don't waste your money. US went through another contraction. This time the largest since the great depression at the beginning of the year. So, tread carefully.

And any news on hiring being up does not apply to LLM's. There are plenty of JD's, so why hire an LLM with just a year of education?

Please folks, don't pin your hopes on WSJ and be dissapointed in a year.
<blockquote>Signs of recovery:

Big US law firms increase entry-level recruitment

http://biglaw.org/news/7984/biglaw-firms-increase-entry-level-recruitment</blockquote>

As an LL.M. you can ignore that news. As a JD you will think, that is not true ...

Then read this:
http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2014/06/23/odds-improve-for-new-law-graduates-though-hiring-levels-remain-soft/

Exact opposite of this:

http://online.wsj.com/articles/big-law-firms-resume-hiring-1403477513

Both in WSJ. The hiring isn't up. Just news reports of doom and gloom are being suppressed. The other key is to notice, that they all suggest, it is going up. Not the number unemployed.

If you are an LL.M. don't waste your money. US went through another contraction. This time the largest since the great depression at the beginning of the year. So, tread carefully.

And any news on hiring being up does not apply to LLM's. There are plenty of JD's, so why hire an LLM with just a year of education?

Please folks, don't pin your hopes on WSJ and be dissapointed in a year.


quote
york

And any news on hiring being up does not apply to LLM's. There are plenty of JD's, so why hire an LLM with just a year of education?


That's true, except that LLM graduates don't have just one year of education (you mean legal education in the US).
<blockquote>
And any news on hiring being up does not apply to LLM's. There are plenty of JD's, so why hire an LLM with just a year of education?
</blockquote>

That's true, except that LLM graduates don't have just one year of education (you mean legal education in the US).
quote
olivers

And any news on hiring being up does not apply to LLM's. There are plenty of JD's, so why hire an LLM with just a year of education?


That's true, except that LLM graduates don't have just one year of education (you mean legal education in the US).


Well that's how the market views LLM's: one year of education, lacking sufficient depth of coverage. JD's have three years of legal education, lacking practical skills. They are also apprehensive about the quality of work output, even from students of otherwise haloed institutions. We can argue about semantics on education vs legal education. LLM is a cash machine for otherwise loss making law schools. They even went so far as to get WSJ to blog on how the hiring has gone back to 2009 levels. Well 2009 wasn't the high, it was 2006. Even before 2009, the hiring had tapered off. It took the 2009 shock to send some firms into oblivion and for the rest to realize they were need to change or they too will go under.
<blockquote><blockquote>
And any news on hiring being up does not apply to LLM's. There are plenty of JD's, so why hire an LLM with just a year of education?
</blockquote>

That's true, except that LLM graduates don't have just one year of education (you mean legal education in the US).</blockquote>

Well that's how the market views LLM's: one year of education, lacking sufficient depth of coverage. JD's have three years of legal education, lacking practical skills. They are also apprehensive about the quality of work output, even from students of otherwise haloed institutions. We can argue about semantics on education vs legal education. LLM is a cash machine for otherwise loss making law schools. They even went so far as to get WSJ to blog on how the hiring has gone back to 2009 levels. Well 2009 wasn't the high, it was 2006. Even before 2009, the hiring had tapered off. It took the 2009 shock to send some firms into oblivion and for the rest to realize they were need to change or they too will go under.
quote
grumpyJD
The US economy is still not great and the job market for new grads (JD) hasn't really improved that much. If there's a slight market correction it's because there are fewer new graduates looking for jobs. Hopefully that trend will continue because the market is flooded with lawyers and the employers can be very selective with new hires. The lawyers I know who are involved in hiring don't care if an applicant has an LLM. Maybe they will care if it's in tax and they are hiring for a boutique tax firm. If not, they consider the LLM as a waste of money and a sign that someone is more interested in academics than the practice of law. Most Americans won't do an LLM because it's expensive and can actually work against them when applying to jobs.
The US economy is still not great and the job market for new grads (JD) hasn't really improved that much. If there's a slight market correction it's because there are fewer new graduates looking for jobs. Hopefully that trend will continue because the market is flooded with lawyers and the employers can be very selective with new hires. The lawyers I know who are involved in hiring don't care if an applicant has an LLM. Maybe they will care if it's in tax and they are hiring for a boutique tax firm. If not, they consider the LLM as a waste of money and a sign that someone is more interested in academics than the practice of law. Most Americans won't do an LLM because it's expensive and can actually work against them when applying to jobs.
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