JD at NSU


marcosca
Hi, my italian law school gives the possibility to get a double degree (italian degree and jd) attending Nova Southeastern University (FL) for two years without paying its expansive fees (but only accomodation, books and transportation).
I'd like to know if this is a good opportunity considering that NSU is a fourth tier law school and the expenses for two years amount to 25.000 $.
I'd like to work in US, but FL is not my favourite potential destination!
Hi, my italian law school gives the possibility to get a double degree (italian degree and jd) attending Nova Southeastern University (FL) for two years without paying its expansive fees (but only accomodation, books and transportation).
I'd like to know if this is a good opportunity considering that NSU is a fourth tier law school and the expenses for two years amount to 25.000 $.
I'd like to work in US, but FL is not my favourite potential destination!




quote
ectax
I'm not sure it is a good deal, especially since you may not want to work in Florida. It may be better to go for a JD or LLM at a much better U.S. law school. I recommend asking to speak with other students who have completed the program at NSU and see how their job search efforts went and how they feel now about spending two years and $25,000.
I'm not sure it is a good deal, especially since you may not want to work in Florida. It may be better to go for a JD or LLM at a much better U.S. law school. I recommend asking to speak with other students who have completed the program at NSU and see how their job search efforts went and how they feel now about spending two years and $25,000.
quote
marcosca
Thank you ectax.
I thought that the JD was attractive even though taken in a 4th tier school. Moreover young foreign lawyers with LLM are increasing while there are not many with JD and, since it's too much expensive get a JD in a more prestigious university, I thought it was a good deal. Don't you think?
Thank you ectax.
I thought that the JD was attractive even though taken in a 4th tier school. Moreover young foreign lawyers with LLM are increasing while there are not many with JD and, since it's too much expensive get a JD in a more prestigious university, I thought it was a good deal. Don't you think?
quote
ectax
I feel bad saying this but here I go:

I do not think the JD will help much unless you intend to practice outside of the U.S. and it appears most people will NOT know enough about the ranking of the law school so as to be biased against it.

If I were advising someone from the U.S., then I would say do NOT attend a 4th tier school UNLESS you already have high level contacts some place, another "in" at a job, OR you are willing to stay local to the area and are not picky about what you do to get started in the legal profession.

If you stay local, then chances are there are a number of attorneys, either solo practitioners or in small firms, quite a few state/local government agencies, and perhaps even some local companies who will give you a chance.

If you venture out of the local area without another "in" or good contacts, everyone will just see you as someone who has attended a 4th tier law school and one that is not even local to their own area.

If cost is the only factor driving you, but you can get in to a much better law school, then I would consider it a good investment. Indeed, anyone graduating from a top 14 law school has over a 90% chance of graduating with a job! The lower ranked law school you attend, the harder it becomes. By the time you get to 4th tier, the odds may no longer be in your favor.
I feel bad saying this but here I go:

I do not think the JD will help much unless you intend to practice outside of the U.S. and it appears most people will NOT know enough about the ranking of the law school so as to be biased against it.

If I were advising someone from the U.S., then I would say do NOT attend a 4th tier school UNLESS you already have high level contacts some place, another "in" at a job, OR you are willing to stay local to the area and are not picky about what you do to get started in the legal profession.

If you stay local, then chances are there are a number of attorneys, either solo practitioners or in small firms, quite a few state/local government agencies, and perhaps even some local companies who will give you a chance.

If you venture out of the local area without another "in" or good contacts, everyone will just see you as someone who has attended a 4th tier law school and one that is not even local to their own area.

If cost is the only factor driving you, but you can get in to a much better law school, then I would consider it a good investment. Indeed, anyone graduating from a top 14 law school has over a 90% chance of graduating with a job! The lower ranked law school you attend, the harder it becomes. By the time you get to 4th tier, the odds may no longer be in your favor.

quote
marcosca
Thank you!
Thank you!
quote
ectax
I'm sorry, it wasn't positive though! I agree with you that it seems there are not as many foreign attorneys with JDs versus LLMs, so your JD idea is a good one.

It is just that when it comes to a JD, the general rule is you should go to the best possible law school you can. Of course, as with nearly every rule, there are exceptions, such as: you are doing law school part-time; this is a second career and you already bringing a wealth of experience to it; you already have a job and just want to add the degree (or your work is paying for it); you already have a good 'in' at a job; you have great contracts; or you are a 'fighter' and don't mind taking the risk that after the time/money spent on law school, you still might have to start from the bottom and work very hard to climb your way up.
I'm sorry, it wasn't positive though! I agree with you that it seems there are not as many foreign attorneys with JDs versus LLMs, so your JD idea is a good one.

It is just that when it comes to a JD, the general rule is you should go to the best possible law school you can. Of course, as with nearly every rule, there are exceptions, such as: you are doing law school part-time; this is a second career and you already bringing a wealth of experience to it; you already have a job and just want to add the degree (or your work is paying for it); you already have a good 'in' at a job; you have great contracts; or you are a 'fighter' and don't mind taking the risk that after the time/money spent on law school, you still might have to start from the bottom and work very hard to climb your way up.
quote

Reply to Post

Related Law Schools

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 9 Followers 4 Discussions

Hot Discussions