Becoming a student again?


Lit

I know quite a number of people on the board have gone back to do their LLMs after having done a few years of work. I just wanted to know how those people felt about the adjustment to being a student again? The primary readjustment would probabbly be financial, going back to living from hand to mouth, as opposed to earning a decent salary as a qualified attorney (for some). But other considerations would include the fact that being a student is predominantly more theoratical than practising and if you're in the States, I understand you're often in the same class as JDs, who might be younger and therefore less mature than you.

That was a bit long-winded, but it would be nice to hear some views from people who were once practising, and then went back to study, how difficult or easy the readjustment was??

I know quite a number of people on the board have gone back to do their LLMs after having done a few years of work. I just wanted to know how those people felt about the adjustment to being a student again? The primary readjustment would probabbly be financial, going back to living from hand to mouth, as opposed to earning a decent salary as a qualified attorney (for some). But other considerations would include the fact that being a student is predominantly more theoratical than practising and if you're in the States, I understand you're often in the same class as JDs, who might be younger and therefore less mature than you.

That was a bit long-winded, but it would be nice to hear some views from people who were once practising, and then went back to study, how difficult or easy the readjustment was??
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dcllm

Yes, it is quite an adjustment to be a student again after practicing law. I just graduated from American University (WCL), but I continued to work full time while going to school only part time. It was hard work, but it was very enjoyable. It also allowed me to maintain the standard of living to which I was accustomed. And yes, you will have JDs in your class. But at WCL, the JDs are very bright, and I found them to have a lot of insight for being younger. Some of the insight I think is a direct result of many JDs working for government agencies, non-profits and firms while going to school. So, if you choose the right school, I think you will find being a student again a wonderful experience.

Best of luck to you.

Yes, it is quite an adjustment to be a student again after practicing law. I just graduated from American University (WCL), but I continued to work full time while going to school only part time. It was hard work, but it was very enjoyable. It also allowed me to maintain the standard of living to which I was accustomed. And yes, you will have JDs in your class. But at WCL, the JDs are very bright, and I found them to have a lot of insight for being younger. Some of the insight I think is a direct result of many JDs working for government agencies, non-profits and firms while going to school. So, if you choose the right school, I think you will find being a student again a wonderful experience.

Best of luck to you.
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Lit

Thanks for the response dcllm. I have heard from quite a number of people that the JDs are terribly smart, which is good, but just two other concerns then: 1. Finances, I understand that most LLM degreees in top schools are too demanding to take a part-time job, so how hard is this on someone who was accustomed to living quite well? 2. Academia v practice, did you find that it was difficult to write and think academically again, as opposed to the more pragmatic practice where you are writitng letters and drafting agreements?

Thanks for the response dcllm. I have heard from quite a number of people that the JDs are terribly smart, which is good, but just two other concerns then: 1. Finances, I understand that most LLM degreees in top schools are too demanding to take a part-time job, so how hard is this on someone who was accustomed to living quite well? 2. Academia v practice, did you find that it was difficult to write and think academically again, as opposed to the more pragmatic practice where you are writitng letters and drafting agreements?
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dcllm

1. Finances. Yes, it will be difficult to get your LLM from a top school and to work at the same time. I had no other option but to work full time and go part time. I know others who went full time and worked part time. I think they had it a little easier than I did, but it was still hard work. I am sure you can do it if you must. It will all be about managing your time wisely.

2. Academia v. Practice. Actually, working made it easy for me to apply the skills I use every day at work in the classroom setting. It made me a better student, and I did very well.

1. Finances. Yes, it will be difficult to get your LLM from a top school and to work at the same time. I had no other option but to work full time and go part time. I know others who went full time and worked part time. I think they had it a little easier than I did, but it was still hard work. I am sure you can do it if you must. It will all be about managing your time wisely.

2. Academia v. Practice. Actually, working made it easy for me to apply the skills I use every day at work in the classroom setting. It made me a better student, and I did very well.
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richardvf

I don't see why it would be difficult to work part-time while attending law school for an LL.M full-time. Most LL.M programs consist of 12 hours per semester of JD classes. Not that difficult. I worked 20 hours per week as a 2L and 3L while averaging 14 hours per semester.

I don't see why it would be difficult to work part-time while attending law school for an LL.M full-time. Most LL.M programs consist of 12 hours per semester of JD classes. Not that difficult. I worked 20 hours per week as a 2L and 3L while averaging 14 hours per semester.
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