Why do Indians prefer BCL over the MJur?


I'm confused! Indians are from a Common Law background, so are they even allowed to read for the MJur? My most important question: How is the BCL superior to the MJur? BCL or MJur: Which one is better for a person intending to teach law? Which one is better for a person intending to work as an associate with a global law firm?

I'm confused! Indians are from a Common Law background, so are they even allowed to read for the MJur? My most important question: How is the BCL superior to the MJur? BCL or MJur: Which one is better for a person intending to teach law? Which one is better for a person intending to work as an associate with a global law firm?
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llmguider

I'm confused! Indians are from a Common Law background, so are they even allowed to read for the MJur? My most important question: How is the BCL superior to the MJur? BCL or MJur: Which one is better for a person intending to teach law? Which one is better for a person intending to work as an associate with a global law firm?


Hi

The fact is that the BCL is not in any sense superior to the MJur. Students share same electives, thus they share same lectures, seminars and exams, and they have the same workload.

But indeed, the fact differs from tradition. Traditionally, the BCL is somehow considered superior to the MJur. This inexplicable discrimination exists even inside the University, as some colleges do not accept MJur students, but accept BCL students. I think the problem here is, as far as I know, that the MJur is a relatively new degree (1991), while the BCL has been well established for centuries (I mean as a degree, not namely at Oxford).

The BCL/MJur degree is really good for future litigators (barristers) and academics. Although this does not mean that you cannot pursue other jobs, say as an associate.

Hope this helps

<blockquote>I'm confused! Indians are from a Common Law background, so are they even allowed to read for the MJur? My most important question: How is the BCL superior to the MJur? BCL or MJur: Which one is better for a person intending to teach law? Which one is better for a person intending to work as an associate with a global law firm?</blockquote>

Hi

The fact is that the BCL is not in any sense superior to the MJur. Students share same electives, thus they share same lectures, seminars and exams, and they have the same workload.

But indeed, the fact differs from tradition. Traditionally, the BCL is somehow considered superior to the MJur. This inexplicable discrimination exists even inside the University, as some colleges do not accept MJur students, but accept BCL students. I think the problem here is, as far as I know, that the MJur is a relatively new degree (1991), while the BCL has been well established for centuries (I mean as a degree, not namely at Oxford).

The BCL/MJur degree is really good for future litigators (barristers) and academics. Although this does not mean that you cannot pursue other jobs, say as an associate.

Hope this helps
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law01

I'm confused! Indians are from a Common Law background, so are they even allowed to read for the MJur? My most important question: How is the BCL superior to the MJur? BCL or MJur: Which one is better for a person intending to teach law? Which one is better for a person intending to work as an associate with a global law firm?


Hi

The fact is that the BCL is not in any sense superior to the MJur. Students share same electives, thus they share same lectures, seminars and exams, and they have the same workload.

But indeed, the fact differs from tradition. Traditionally, the BCL is somehow considered superior to the MJur. This inexplicable discrimination exists even inside the University, as some colleges do not accept MJur students, but accept BCL students. I think the problem here is, as far as I know, that the MJur is a relatively new degree (1991), while the BCL has been well established for centuries (I mean as a degree, not namely at Oxford).

The BCL/MJur degree is really good for future litigators (barristers) and academics. Although this does not mean that you cannot pursue other jobs, say as an associate.

Hope this helps


I do agree with you on some points, however it should be noted that:

1) The BCL extremely weel respected within chambers, if you want to become a barrister then the only post-grad degrees that would add something to your CV are the BCL or the Harvard LLM
2) The BCL is considered as the most intellectually challenging post-grad degree in the world together with the Harvard LLM
3) Major difference though is this:
'The MJur is a one-year postgraduate degree programme for students who already hold
an undergraduate law degree (or equivalent) in a jurisdiction outside the common-law
world.'

So the mjur will add nothing if you want to work in the UK

<blockquote><blockquote>I'm confused! Indians are from a Common Law background, so are they even allowed to read for the MJur? My most important question: How is the BCL superior to the MJur? BCL or MJur: Which one is better for a person intending to teach law? Which one is better for a person intending to work as an associate with a global law firm?</blockquote>

Hi

The fact is that the BCL is not in any sense superior to the MJur. Students share same electives, thus they share same lectures, seminars and exams, and they have the same workload.

But indeed, the fact differs from tradition. Traditionally, the BCL is somehow considered superior to the MJur. This inexplicable discrimination exists even inside the University, as some colleges do not accept MJur students, but accept BCL students. I think the problem here is, as far as I know, that the MJur is a relatively new degree (1991), while the BCL has been well established for centuries (I mean as a degree, not namely at Oxford).

The BCL/MJur degree is really good for future litigators (barristers) and academics. Although this does not mean that you cannot pursue other jobs, say as an associate.

Hope this helps</blockquote>

I do agree with you on some points, however it should be noted that:

1) The BCL extremely weel respected within chambers, if you want to become a barrister then the only post-grad degrees that would add something to your CV are the BCL or the Harvard LLM
2) The BCL is considered as the most intellectually challenging post-grad degree in the world together with the Harvard LLM
3) Major difference though is this:
'The MJur is a one-year postgraduate degree programme for students who already hold
an undergraduate law degree (or equivalent) in a jurisdiction outside the common-law
world.'

So the mjur will add nothing if you want to work in the UK
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Mac23

There are two differences between the two pograms: the BCL is for students from common law countries, the MJur for students from civil law countries. Second, those reading for the MJur can select one course from the BA curriculum.
In brief, they are the same, and I don't think there is any difference in terms of reputation, because there simply is no rational explanation accounting for such difference!

There are two differences between the two pograms: the BCL is for students from common law countries, the MJur for students from civil law countries. Second, those reading for the MJur can select one course from the BA curriculum.
In brief, they are the same, and I don't think there is any difference in terms of reputation, because there simply is no rational explanation accounting for such difference!
quote

@llmguider Indians are from the Common Law background, so are they allowed to read for the MJur?

@llmguider Indians are from the Common Law background, so are they allowed to read for the MJur?
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Mac23

I think the answer is a plain no. When I did my MJur there, I knew a number of Indians, all doing the BCL.

I think the answer is a plain no. When I did my MJur there, I knew a number of Indians, all doing the BCL.
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I think the answer is a plain no. When I did my MJur there, I knew a number of Indians, all doing the BCL.


I guess so. Even all 14 current Indian students who enrolled for a postgraduate program in law at Oxford including Rhodes scholar Arushi Garg read for the BCL, not even one read for the MJur. I still asked because Wikipedia states that India has a hybrid legal system (Refer: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_national_legal_systems#Hybrid_law ).

<blockquote>I think the answer is a plain no. When I did my MJur there, I knew a number of Indians, all doing the BCL.</blockquote>

I guess so. Even all 14 current Indian students who enrolled for a postgraduate program in law at Oxford including Rhodes scholar Arushi Garg read for the BCL, not even one read for the MJur. I still asked because Wikipedia states that India has a hybrid legal system (Refer: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_national_legal_systems#Hybrid_law ).
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Mac23

If India is a hybrid legal system then Oxford may allow you to do the MJur rather than the BCL, but given that the two programs are the same I don't see why one should ask for a special permission to do one instead of the other.

If India is a hybrid legal system then Oxford may allow you to do the MJur rather than the BCL, but given that the two programs are the same I don't see why one should ask for a special permission to do one instead of the other.
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