SoP style for LSE LL.M.??? Would the US anecdote style work?


WAAstor

Hello, everyone!

I wonder if anyone could enlighten me with the preferred writing style of a personal statement for LSE LL.M. programme application, please?

I have learned that the US schools enjoy the more anecdote-styled, and Oxbridge likes hard facts and tangible results. But, how about the LSE?

Would it be alright to have my anecdote-styled personal statement I originally prepare for US schools tailored into British English for LSE? or I need to present my case in the same way as Oxbridge prefers the statement?

Thank you in advance! :D

Hello, everyone!

I wonder if anyone could enlighten me with the preferred writing style of a personal statement for LSE LL.M. programme application, please?

I have learned that the US schools enjoy the more anecdote-styled, and Oxbridge likes hard facts and tangible results. But, how about the LSE?

Would it be alright to have my anecdote-styled personal statement I originally prepare for US schools tailored into British English for LSE? or I need to present my case in the same way as Oxbridge prefers the statement?

Thank you in advance! :D
quote
llmadvise

Hello WAAstor,
LSE prefers facts and results like Oxbridge although they differ in their expectations.
Whilst LSE places an importance on the length of the statement (4,000 characters, or 47 lines), Oxbridge looks more for originality and that you followed up on your interest in law through extracurricular activities. You need to sell yourself so that you make them want to meet you (interview).
LSE doesn't have interviews so the statement is your chance to express yourself. You need to grab their attention. This works nicely with the anecdote- style but they want to see facts. Write about your academic standard, level of knowledge (including proficiency in English) and motivation, nature and extent of your interest and answer all the "W" questions.
About 25% of your LSE statement should be on your non-academic activities.
Best of luck!

Hello WAAstor,
LSE prefers facts and results like Oxbridge although they differ in their expectations.
Whilst LSE places an importance on the length of the statement (4,000 characters, or 47 lines), Oxbridge looks more for originality and that you followed up on your interest in law through extracurricular activities. You need to sell yourself so that you make them want to meet you (interview).
LSE doesn't have interviews so the statement is your chance to express yourself. You need to grab their attention. This works nicely with the anecdote- style but they want to see facts. Write about your academic standard, level of knowledge (including proficiency in English) and motivation, nature and extent of your interest and answer all the "W" questions.
About 25% of your LSE statement should be on your non-academic activities.
Best of luck!
quote

4000 characters limit?
Is that specifically mentioned somewhere?

4000 characters limit?
Is that specifically mentioned somewhere?
quote
WAAstor

Thank you for your advice, llmadvise ;)

to TiredApplicant,
well, I don't think there's anywhere that specifically mentions the characters limit of the personal statement for LSE though. They said they look for the length between 1,200-1,500 words, right? (on the online application page). I ended up writing around 1,350 words, and that would be around 7,000 something characters.

Thank you for your advice, llmadvise ;)

to TiredApplicant,
well, I don't think there's anywhere that specifically mentions the characters limit of the personal statement for LSE though. They said they look for the length between 1,200-1,500 words, right? (on the online application page). I ended up writing around 1,350 words, and that would be around 7,000 something characters.



quote
llmadvise

4000 characters limit?
Is that specifically mentioned somewhere?


Well, I found this information on LSE website about "What makes a good personal statement". In the paragraph above the section about mature students is mentioned "UCAS state that applicants can use a maximum of 4,000 characters, or 47 lines, in their statement and we would expect applicants to the School to fully use the space allowed. " As UCAS is relevant for undergraduates, I believe it is not binding. Nevertheless, I would stay within limit. Nobody wants to read a novel but if you don't reveal anything about you it might not convince.

<blockquote>4000 characters limit?
Is that specifically mentioned somewhere?</blockquote>

Well, I found this information on LSE website about "What makes a good personal statement". In the paragraph above the section about mature students is mentioned "UCAS state that applicants can use a maximum of 4,000 characters, or 47 lines, in their statement and we would expect applicants to the School to fully use the space allowed. " As UCAS is relevant for undergraduates, I believe it is not binding. Nevertheless, I would stay within limit. Nobody wants to read a novel but if you don't reveal anything about you it might not convince.
quote

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