Practicing Law in UK


data_xa

Hi all
I was wondering what are the academic criteria in order to practice law in England (either barrister or solicitor) for the law graduate from civil law jurisdiction.

- What would be a fastest track for civil law graduate to get the academic component of legal practicing complied with. Does Mjur which is designated for civil lawyers help for this purpose to transmit to comon law system and practice law in the UK?

- If it appears that I need to undertake another undergraduate degree now in the UK how do you think is it possible to get some of the credits of my home country LLB recognized (for instance: Roman Law/Public International Law which seems to be similar)

- Is there any chance to avoid undertaking undergrad once more? for instance are there any programs like JD?

Hi all
I was wondering what are the academic criteria in order to practice law in England (either barrister or solicitor) for the law graduate from civil law jurisdiction.

- What would be a fastest track for civil law graduate to get the academic component of legal practicing complied with. Does Mjur which is designated for civil lawyers help for this purpose to transmit to comon law system and practice law in the UK?

- If it appears that I need to undertake another undergraduate degree now in the UK how do you think is it possible to get some of the credits of my home country LLB recognized (for instance: Roman Law/Public International Law which seems to be similar)

- Is there any chance to avoid undertaking undergrad once more? for instance are there any programs like JD?
quote
Good Gosh

1) no

2) your best bet is either a GDL (graduate diploma in law), a one year 'conversion course' (see BPP or College of Law, for example). alternatively you could read for a 'senior status LLB', which only takes two years.

good luck

1) no

2) your best bet is either a GDL (graduate diploma in law), a one year 'conversion course' (see BPP or College of Law, for example). alternatively you could read for a 'senior status LLB', which only takes two years.

good luck
quote
rpsnrbr

Pardon me, GoodGosh, but your answer is off on this one.

Actually, if you are a qualified lawyer in any of the countries listed by the SRA, you can take the QLTT to be able to practice in England and Wales.

http://www.sra.org.uk/solicitors/qltt.page

Pardon me, GoodGosh, but your answer is off on this one.

Actually, if you are a qualified lawyer in any of the countries listed by the SRA, you can take the QLTT to be able to practice in England and Wales.

http://www.sra.org.uk/solicitors/qltt.page
quote
CoL Yank

Hello. There are several options available. See the Discussion Board for "The reputation of the college of law (of england and whales)"..... i think you will find alot of useful info for you there.

Hello. There are several options available. See the Discussion Board for "The reputation of the college of law (of england and whales)"..... i think you will find alot of useful info for you there.
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Kerfuffle

As a graduate (and not a qualified lawyer) you have two paths:
- GDL, plus LPC, and then two years TC.
- Two year law degree, plus LPC, then two years TC.

As a graduate (and not a qualified lawyer) you have two paths:
- GDL, plus LPC, and then two years TC.
- Two year law degree, plus LPC, then two years TC.
quote
rpsnrbr

Sorry, apparently I assumed you were already qualified to practise in your home jurisdiction, given that in my country, upon graduation, you just have to pass the bar; you can hardly find anyone who graduates and does not attempt to do just that.

Anyway, it could be faster for you to just pass the bar in your home country, than study for the transfer exam and apply.

Sorry, apparently I assumed you were already qualified to practise in your home jurisdiction, given that in my country, upon graduation, you just have to pass the bar; you can hardly find anyone who graduates and does not attempt to do just that.

Anyway, it could be faster for you to just pass the bar in your home country, than study for the transfer exam and apply.
quote
data_xa

Thank you very much, it helped a lot :))
Unfortunately my country is not included in QLTS eligible jurisdictions list.
I wanted to ask about the draduate diploma in law. Like Oxford also has it in IP. However when I checked it on http://www.sra.org.uk/
It seems that this course is not an academic prerequisite for taking another step for practicing.
I was wondering if all the Graduate Diploma Courses are providing an opportunity for practicing?
thank you again

Thank you very much, it helped a lot :))
Unfortunately my country is not included in QLTS eligible jurisdictions list.
I wanted to ask about the draduate diploma in law. Like Oxford also has it in IP. However when I checked it on http://www.sra.org.uk/
It seems that this course is not an academic prerequisite for taking another step for practicing.
I was wondering if all the Graduate Diploma Courses are providing an opportunity for practicing?
thank you again
quote
Good Gosh

you're confused here, to practice you need to take course called a 'Graduate Diploma in Law', which is a crash course of English law. the main providers include BPP, College of Law, and City University. Go to their websites to find out more.

you're confused here, to practice you need to take course called a 'Graduate Diploma in Law', which is a crash course of English law. the main providers include BPP, College of Law, and City University. Go to their websites to find out more.
quote

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