Oxford BCL straight after undergraduate?


lotsalag

Hi,

I'm in my fifth year of a Bachelor of Arts (International Relations)/Bachelor of Laws undergraduate double degree which I'm doing in Australia. I plan to graduate in June 2008.

Now I know with US Masters programmes, they prefer applicants to have a year of experience before applying.

However, I have heard with the Oxford BCL that you should apply to it straight after you finish your undergraduate degree. Is this correct?

I would like to work for a year before applying for the BCL as I think it would give me a better chance at a scholarship and the like but I don't want to miss the boat so to speak.

Thanks for any help!

Hi,

I'm in my fifth year of a Bachelor of Arts (International Relations)/Bachelor of Laws undergraduate double degree which I'm doing in Australia. I plan to graduate in June 2008.

Now I know with US Masters programmes, they prefer applicants to have a year of experience before applying.

However, I have heard with the Oxford BCL that you should apply to it straight after you finish your undergraduate degree. Is this correct?

I would like to work for a year before applying for the BCL as I think it would give me a better chance at a scholarship and the like but I don't want to miss the boat so to speak.

Thanks for any help!
quote
AndrewC

Well, I got a place on the BCL and all I'd done was a three-year LLB. I have worked this year but only in order to fund myself come autumn time. It hasn't really been "experience" either, just bog-standard clerical work. I'd say go for it, it certainly seems to me like their selection criteria are more geared towards your academic abilities / potential than anything else.

Well, I got a place on the BCL and all I'd done was a three-year LLB. I have worked this year but only in order to fund myself come autumn time. It hasn't really been "experience" either, just bog-standard clerical work. I'd say go for it, it certainly seems to me like their selection criteria are more geared towards your academic abilities / potential than anything else.
quote
IPCT

I got a place for the BCL this year after a year working as a solicitor. It certainly isn't a disadvantage to have work experience, if your academic marks are good enough in the first place. Plus, you are correct there's more capacity to get a scholarship if you have worked as well as studied. If you want to stay in the UK and work after the BCL, it would also be a good idea to have some work experience.

I got a place for the BCL this year after a year working as a solicitor. It certainly isn't a disadvantage to have work experience, if your academic marks are good enough in the first place. Plus, you are correct there's more capacity to get a scholarship if you have worked as well as studied. If you want to stay in the UK and work after the BCL, it would also be a good idea to have some work experience.
quote
Catullus

I agree -- I don't think work matters as much as your academic credentials; if you have been out of school for a while, it's probably best to have worked though.

I agree -- I don't think work matters as much as your academic credentials; if you have been out of school for a while, it's probably best to have worked though.
quote
Rumpole

I agree with the above posters. i got into the BCL without any work ex. but I don't think there is any 'acceptance bias' in favour of people fresh out of law school. I know an equal number of people who got in with and without work ex.

Prof. John Gardner, who used to head the BCL admission panel has emphasised that it IS primarily an academic degree and therefore academic qualfications are what concern them the most when taking an admision decision. See-

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?p=7478560#post7478560

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=351169&page=2

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?p=7524888#post7524888

He's still active on that Board so maybe you just post there and ask him!

I agree with the above posters. i got into the BCL without any work ex. but I don't think there is any 'acceptance bias' in favour of people fresh out of law school. I know an equal number of people who got in with and without work ex.

Prof. John Gardner, who used to head the BCL admission panel has emphasised that it IS primarily an academic degree and therefore academic qualfications are what concern them the most when taking an admision decision. See-

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?p=7478560#post7478560

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=351169&page=2

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?p=7524888#post7524888

He's still active on that Board so maybe you just post there and ask him!
quote

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