Mst at Oxford?


pogomail
Hello again everyone,

I was wondering if anyone has any insights about the Mst in International Human Rights Law at Oxford.

It is not an LLM, but Oxford doesnt offer an LLM in Human Rights, and they explain that it is an equivalent degree.

However, I am concerned that it is not called an LLM, and that may cause problems for potential employers.

Moreover, it is a distance education program - 20 months part time off campus, 4 months on campus, and I concerned that may be a problem for employers too. Ie: they wont see it as a "proper" degree, even though it is from Oxford.

If any one has an thoughts on this program please let me know, I am struggling to get perspectives as most people have not heard of it.

Cheers
Jo (Australia.)
Hello again everyone,

I was wondering if anyone has any insights about the Mst in International Human Rights Law at Oxford.

It is not an LLM, but Oxford doesnt offer an LLM in Human Rights, and they explain that it is an equivalent degree.

However, I am concerned that it is not called an LLM, and that may cause problems for potential employers.

Moreover, it is a distance education program - 20 months part time off campus, 4 months on campus, and I concerned that may be a problem for employers too. Ie: they wont see it as a "proper" degree, even though it is from Oxford.

If any one has an thoughts on this program please let me know, I am struggling to get perspectives as most people have not heard of it.

Cheers
Jo (Australia.)
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You'd have to check with admissions about this - but I believe the reason the Mst is called the Mst and not an LLM is due to some silly bureaucratic reasons about part-time courses. I know this is definitely the case for Cambridge where a part-time MPhil is known as a Mst.

The Oxford course is very well known, and anyone who wants itl human rights training will try for this course. I wouldn't see any reason why employers would not see it as a 'proper' degree - presumably you'd be targetting international organisations and human rights specialists - all of who would be very aware of the reputation of the course.

I was very attracted to it myself - but didn't entertain it because of the cost :(
You'd have to check with admissions about this - but I believe the reason the Mst is called the Mst and not an LLM is due to some silly bureaucratic reasons about part-time courses. I know this is definitely the case for Cambridge where a part-time MPhil is known as a Mst.

The Oxford course is very well known, and anyone who wants itl human rights training will try for this course. I wouldn't see any reason why employers would not see it as a 'proper' degree - presumably you'd be targetting international organisations and human rights specialists - all of who would be very aware of the reputation of the course.

I was very attracted to it myself - but didn't entertain it because of the cost :(
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lakaria
Don worrie, oxford is always trying to be different from other. Eg. their Law deg is not LLB rather BA (Law) and their master is actually call Mst and BCI. BCI is for civil law and Mst is tor criminal. If u want a full time and in house study, go for BCI. But both is reputable enough. Did u get admitted for it already?
Don worrie, oxford is always trying to be different from other. Eg. their Law deg is not LLB rather BA (Law) and their master is actually call Mst and BCI. BCI is for civil law and Mst is tor criminal. If u want a full time and in house study, go for BCI. But both is reputable enough. Did u get admitted for it already?
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exbcler
Don worrie, oxford is always trying to be different from other. Eg. their Law deg is not LLB rather BA (Law) and their master is actually call Mst and BCI. BCI is for civil law and Mst is tor criminal. If u want a full time and in house study, go for BCI. But both is reputable enough. Did u get admitted for it already?


Um, no. The BCL is the postgraduate degree for graduates of universities in Commonwealth (common law) jurisdictions. The parallel programme for civilian lawyers is the MJur (Magister Juris).

The MSt is the human rights degree.

There is an MSc in criminology.

http://denning.law.ox.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught.shtml
<blockquote>Don worrie, oxford is always trying to be different from other. Eg. their Law deg is not LLB rather BA (Law) and their master is actually call Mst and BCI. BCI is for civil law and Mst is tor criminal. If u want a full time and in house study, go for BCI. But both is reputable enough. Did u get admitted for it already?</blockquote>

Um, no. The BCL is the postgraduate degree for graduates of universities in Commonwealth (common law) jurisdictions. The parallel programme for civilian lawyers is the MJur (Magister Juris).

The MSt is the human rights degree.

There is an MSc in criminology.

http://denning.law.ox.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught.shtml
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lakaria
Mst is still a law degree and for your information Australia is a common law countries so BCL is pefectly good for the asker as it is master level for civil law. I am quite sure he do not need MJur since he is not from a civil law country so I am bewildered in your advice for MJur at all. Lastly, MSc is also a law degree in certain sense but it is name Master in Science which does not look too legal correct for me and criminology is too much of a sociology subject as far as I concern. If you are interested in substantial law then BCL or Mst is the one for you.

Australia is a commonwealth countries unless I g
Mst is still a law degree and for your information Australia is a common law countries so BCL is pefectly good for the asker as it is master level for civil law. I am quite sure he do not need MJur since he is not from a civil law country so I am bewildered in your advice for MJur at all. Lastly, MSc is also a law degree in certain sense but it is name Master in Science which does not look too legal correct for me and criminology is too much of a sociology subject as far as I concern. If you are interested in substantial law then BCL or Mst is the one for you.

Australia is a commonwealth countries unless I g
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exbcler
@Lakaria: thanks for your mini-lecture, but I was actually at Oxford for the BCL, so my post was intended to clear up the misconception that the BCL is for civil law, and the MSt is for criminal law.

In any case, the info direct from source is available at the URL I posted.
@Lakaria: thanks for your mini-lecture, but I was actually at Oxford for the BCL, so my post was intended to clear up the misconception that the BCL is for civil law, and the MSt is for criminal law.

In any case, the info direct from source is available at the URL I posted.

quote
mm
I realize this reply may come too late to answer your question, but I wanted to respond in case others have a similar question. I did the Mst in Intl Human Rights at Oxford, and I simply write "LLM equivalent" on my CV. That helps potential employers understand it, and even encourages them to ask me about it in the interview -- it opens up an opportunity to discuss it further. Oxford likes to have different names for their degrees, but employers recognize the name and reputation of the university. I do not advertise that it was part-time on my CV, but if asked, I can explain how the program worked, and emphasize the fantastic group of professional colleagues that came together BECAUSE they did not have to leave their jobs.
After all that, I have to say that this is an amazing, incredible, wonderful program. I learned so much and met very impressive and accomplished individuals from all over the world. I can't say how this program compares to other LLM programs, but if it fits into what you think you're looking for out of an academic experience, definitely consider it.
I realize this reply may come too late to answer your question, but I wanted to respond in case others have a similar question. I did the Mst in Intl Human Rights at Oxford, and I simply write "LLM equivalent" on my CV. That helps potential employers understand it, and even encourages them to ask me about it in the interview -- it opens up an opportunity to discuss it further. Oxford likes to have different names for their degrees, but employers recognize the name and reputation of the university. I do not advertise that it was part-time on my CV, but if asked, I can explain how the program worked, and emphasize the fantastic group of professional colleagues that came together BECAUSE they did not have to leave their jobs.
After all that, I have to say that this is an amazing, incredible, wonderful program. I learned so much and met very impressive and accomplished individuals from all over the world. I can't say how this program compares to other LLM programs, but if it fits into what you think you're looking for out of an academic experience, definitely consider it.
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