Master in Human Rights


subsister
Heya!
got accepted to these three programmes for 2008, but still haven't been able to make up my mind. any thoughts?

MA in Human Rights Law - Soas
MSc in Human Rights - LSE
E.MA in Human Rights and Democratisation - Venice

Cheers,
-s
Heya!
got accepted to these three programmes for 2008, but still haven't been able to make up my mind. any thoughts?

MA in Human Rights Law - Soas
MSc in Human Rights - LSE
E.MA in Human Rights and Democratisation - Venice

Cheers,
-s
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In my opinion, the MSc in Human Rights at the LSE would be a good choice among the three. Congratulations and good luck on your studies.
In my opinion, the MSc in Human Rights at the LSE would be a good choice among the three. Congratulations and good luck on your studies.
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haroldjam
I need opinions fast.

I am a British Chevening Scholar. I got accepted into the MSc Human Rights Programme at LSE because my application for the LLM Human Rights was received late because of a transcript mix up from my last university. I was therefore not considered.

I have an acceptance/offer letter from Nottingham for a LLM Human RIghts. What do I choose? LSE has a stronger reputation but Nottingham will award me a LLM. Help me to decide someone.

I i did get into the LLM
I need opinions fast.

I am a British Chevening Scholar. I got accepted into the MSc Human Rights Programme at LSE because my application for the LLM Human Rights was received late because of a transcript mix up from my last university. I was therefore not considered.

I have an acceptance/offer letter from Nottingham for a LLM Human RIghts. What do I choose? LSE has a stronger reputation but Nottingham will award me a LLM. Help me to decide someone.

I i did get into the LLM
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upnorth
Is it just the MSc title of LSE's course that puts you off or the content of the MSc course? How different is it in substance to the LLM?
Is it just the MSc title of LSE's course that puts you off or the content of the MSc course? How different is it in substance to the LLM?

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It all depends on your career objectives. The difference in nomenclature is incidental. Both are Master's degrees and will provide you excellent training in the field of human rights. You may need to evaluate both your short-term and long-term objectives as a lawyer. Good luck.
It all depends on your career objectives. The difference in nomenclature is incidental. Both are Master's degrees and will provide you excellent training in the field of human rights. You may need to evaluate both your short-term and long-term objectives as a lawyer. Good luck.
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haroldjam
Thank you for responding to my post. Your questions have helped to clarify because in truth it is the title MSc which was a bother to me. I wanted a LLM. The courses I will do are most likely very similar and in many instances will be the same. I guess I am going lse because I think it has a stronger reputation even though like Nottingham its part of the Russell group. Also, I hadn't gotten accommodation from LsE while Nottingham giving me a studio. I guess I can always do the phd at camridge or oxford

Thank you for responding to my post. Your questions have helped to clarify because in truth it is the title MSc which was a bother to me. I wanted a LLM. The courses I will do are most likely very similar and in many instances will be the same. I guess I am going lse because I think it has a stronger reputation even though like Nottingham its part of the Russell group. Also, I hadn't gotten accommodation from LsE while Nottingham giving me a studio. I guess I can always do the phd at camridge or oxford
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Pit Possum
@haroldjam:

I attended the University of Nottingham from 2007 to 2008 and graduated with an LL.M. International Commercial Law. However, according to what I have heard from my fellow students, Nottingham has a very strong reputation for Human Rights Law and the courses seem to be very good. In addition, they have some kind of human rights research centre where you can get a student job. Can't say much about the LSE, apart from the fact that it is a quite prestiguous (and expensive...:-) ) university. In addition, living in Nottingham of course cannot compare to living in London...
@haroldjam:

I attended the University of Nottingham from 2007 to 2008 and graduated with an LL.M. International Commercial Law. However, according to what I have heard from my fellow students, Nottingham has a very strong reputation for Human Rights Law and the courses seem to be very good. In addition, they have some kind of human rights research centre where you can get a student job. Can't say much about the LSE, apart from the fact that it is a quite prestiguous (and expensive...:-) ) university. In addition, living in Nottingham of course cannot compare to living in London...
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haroldjam
LSE is indeed prestigious. I have come full circle and I am accepting the LLM at nottingham. The point is that for phd work etc I think I am better off with a LLM and I am not sure if the Msc will have that much. Weight especially when I want to teach even though it is LSE. They too have a Human rights centre but its not run by the law department more like the sociology department. I really had wished for a LLM and LSE but it just seem I can't get both this year. As for expense I have a full scholarship wherever I go

LSE is indeed prestigious. I have come full circle and I am accepting the LLM at nottingham. The point is that for phd work etc I think I am better off with a LLM and I am not sure if the Msc will have that much. Weight especially when I want to teach even though it is LSE. They too have a Human rights centre but its not run by the law department more like the sociology department. I really had wished for a LLM and LSE but it just seem I can't get both this year. As for expense I have a full scholarship wherever I go
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Banking
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haroldjam
What is the status of nottingham

Now I am even more confused. I was told that the programme completely filled.

What is the status of nottingham

Now I am even more confused. I was told that the programme completely filled.
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Banking
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Banking
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haroldjam
People reading these posts must think I am the most indecisive person in the world going wherever the wind blows because as of now I am back with LSE *and just to ensure I can't cancel I am going to decline the offer from nottingham officially... That way there is no turning back and I will have no choice. I also will check unite and goodenough trust and in the end I will take a reference go ealry and try and switch programmes



People reading these posts must think I am the most indecisive person in the world going wherever the wind blows because as of now I am back with LSE *and just to ensure I can't cancel I am going to decline the offer from nottingham officially... That way there is no turning back and I will have no choice. I also will check unite and goodenough trust and in the end I will take a reference go ealry and try and switch programmes
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Interalia


haroldjam:

People reading these posts must think I am the most indecisive person in the world going wherever the wind blows because as of now I am back with LSE *and just to ensure I can't cancel I am going to decline the offer from nottingham officially... That way there is no turning back and I will have no choice. I also will check unite and goodenough trust and in the end I will take a reference go ealry and try and switch programmes


My advice below only applies if you intend to further your studies with a phD. From your posts above it is a little unclear, so if you're not intending to, just ignore it.

The actual minimum requirement to do a phD is only a LLB, although universities STRONGLY prefer a LLM. Before doing anything rash like declining the nottingham offer, maybe you should call the universities you intend to apply to do a phD with and ask whether a MSc suffices in place of a LLM, just to be on the safe side. You might be able to transfer LSE's LLM when you get there, then again there's an equal chance you might not. Personally, if I were in your shoes I wouldn't want to take the chance of wasting a year of my life doing a Msc and then realizing it's useless for entry into a Law phD - regardless of whether it's LSE.

I have to disagree with Banking on the value of a LSE degree with regards to academia, and especially on entering a phD program. I think he is right when you're considering the corporate world where LSE is treated with almost god like reverence but academia is a whole different animal. In academic circles, I personally think nottingham is the bigger name in human rights and the selection committees all know it. As lmwoods said in another post, when you think human rights you think nottingham and essex not the london schools. Furthermore, school brand name does not carry as much weight with phD selection committees as they do in the corporate world. The most important thing really is your masters thesis, grades and recommendations. Oxford and Cambridge do routinely take in candidates from so called lesser schools.

At the end of the day, if your intention to get a final phD degree from oxford or cambridge anyway, I don't see what's the relevance of your LLM's degree brand name. I don't think any perspective employer is going to fault you just because your intermediate LLM degree was from a lesser brand name school.
<blockquote>

haroldjam:

People reading these posts must think I am the most indecisive person in the world going wherever the wind blows because as of now I am back with LSE *and just to ensure I can't cancel I am going to decline the offer from nottingham officially... That way there is no turning back and I will have no choice. I also will check unite and goodenough trust and in the end I will take a reference go ealry and try and switch programmes</blockquote>

My advice below only applies if you intend to further your studies with a phD. From your posts above it is a little unclear, so if you're not intending to, just ignore it.

The actual minimum requirement to do a phD is only a LLB, although universities STRONGLY prefer a LLM. Before doing anything rash like declining the nottingham offer, maybe you should call the universities you intend to apply to do a phD with and ask whether a MSc suffices in place of a LLM, just to be on the safe side. You might be able to transfer LSE's LLM when you get there, then again there's an equal chance you might not. Personally, if I were in your shoes I wouldn't want to take the chance of wasting a year of my life doing a Msc and then realizing it's useless for entry into a Law phD - regardless of whether it's LSE.

I have to disagree with Banking on the value of a LSE degree with regards to academia, and especially on entering a phD program. I think he is right when you're considering the corporate world where LSE is treated with almost god like reverence but academia is a whole different animal. In academic circles, I personally think nottingham is the bigger name in human rights and the selection committees all know it. As lmwoods said in another post, when you think human rights you think nottingham and essex not the london schools. Furthermore, school brand name does not carry as much weight with phD selection committees as they do in the corporate world. The most important thing really is your masters thesis, grades and recommendations. Oxford and Cambridge do routinely take in candidates from so called lesser schools.

At the end of the day, if your intention to get a final phD degree from oxford or cambridge anyway, I don't see what's the relevance of your LLM's degree brand name. I don't think any perspective employer is going to fault you just because your intermediate LLM degree was from a lesser brand name school.
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Banking
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Banking
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Interalia
Interalia is right, Nottingham might be a good name in human rights in the UK. But I'll disagree with her - LSE will open more doors for you should you decide to practice or move abroad to Europe, Asia or US. Nottingham is less known there...


Agree with you Banking. Nottingham's reputation does lag behind LSE in both Europe and the US. I should have clarified myself. The Original Poster was considering a phD in human rights in Cambridge and Oxford and I think with regards to those two schools at least, Nottingham would be just as good as LSE for a phD application. For a UK phD selection committee at least, I think Nottingham is just as good as LSE.

For a rough guide as to which foreign universities are normally considered reputable in the US, Harvard has produced a helpful list. It can be found at http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/degrees/special-programs/study-abroad/file-uploads/list-of-foreign-law-schools.html
<blockquote>Interalia is right, Nottingham might be a good name in human rights in the UK. But I'll disagree with her - LSE will open more doors for you should you decide to practice or move abroad to Europe, Asia or US. Nottingham is less known there...</blockquote>

Agree with you Banking. Nottingham's reputation does lag behind LSE in both Europe and the US. I should have clarified myself. The Original Poster was considering a phD in human rights in Cambridge and Oxford and I think with regards to those two schools at least, Nottingham would be just as good as LSE for a phD application. For a UK phD selection committee at least, I think Nottingham is just as good as LSE.

For a rough guide as to which foreign universities are normally considered reputable in the US, Harvard has produced a helpful list. It can be found at http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/degrees/special-programs/study-abroad/file-uploads/list-of-foreign-law-schools.html

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haroldjam
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Banking
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Banking
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