LLM or MSc-degree - Does it impact my career options?


malte
Hi,

I will graduate with a liberal arts & science degree (with 1/3 of my credits in law) from the Netherlands this summer. My intention is to continue with postgraduate study for a year afterwards, followed by both GDL & LPC and (hopefully) a training contract in England.

Since I do not have a "proper" law degree, admission into law-related programmes at postgraduate level has obviously been somewhat difficult. I received offers for the following programmes:

- Edinburgh LLM International Law
- UCL MA Human Rights
- LSE MSc Human Rights

I am currently torn between LSE and Edinburgh. Paradoxically, my curriculum would be very similar at both places - a general focus on human rights law with 1-2 additional legal theory courses. Edinburgh offers the advantage of awarding a proper LLM in International Law rather than just an MA or MSc in Human Rights. LSE on the other hand has an even better reputation and the faculty seems to be a little better.

My question is this: Does the title of my postgraduate degree have any influence on my future career options; especially on my chances of obtaining a TC to fund both GDL & LPC?

If an MsC in Human Rights from LSE would be less highly regarded than an LLM from Edinburgh, that would probably be an important factor in my decision-making. After all, nearly all other factors don't provide a strong indication for me (though I have a slight tendency towards LSE). Or maybe the "brand name" of LSE plays a big enough role to make up for the name of the degree?

My postgraduate-study is really purely based on academic interest, so it does not imply that I aim to focus on human rights as a practitioner.

Any advice (especially from practitioners) would be much appreciated.

Thanks,

Malte
Hi,

I will graduate with a liberal arts & science degree (with 1/3 of my credits in law) from the Netherlands this summer. My intention is to continue with postgraduate study for a year afterwards, followed by both GDL & LPC and (hopefully) a training contract in England.

Since I do not have a "proper" law degree, admission into law-related programmes at postgraduate level has obviously been somewhat difficult. I received offers for the following programmes:

- Edinburgh LLM International Law
- UCL MA Human Rights
- LSE MSc Human Rights

I am currently torn between LSE and Edinburgh. Paradoxically, my curriculum would be very similar at both places - a general focus on human rights law with 1-2 additional legal theory courses. Edinburgh offers the advantage of awarding a proper LLM in International Law rather than just an MA or MSc in Human Rights. LSE on the other hand has an even better reputation and the faculty seems to be a little better.

My question is this: Does the title of my postgraduate degree have any influence on my future career options; especially on my chances of obtaining a TC to fund both GDL & LPC?

If an MsC in Human Rights from LSE would be less highly regarded than an LLM from Edinburgh, that would probably be an important factor in my decision-making. After all, nearly all other factors don't provide a strong indication for me (though I have a slight tendency towards LSE). Or maybe the "brand name" of LSE plays a big enough role to make up for the name of the degree?

My postgraduate-study is really purely based on academic interest, so it does not imply that I aim to focus on human rights as a practitioner.

Any advice (especially from practitioners) would be much appreciated.

Thanks,

Malte
quote
I have similar concerns, Oxford msc in criminology and criminal justice or LSE llm.
I have similar concerns, Oxford msc in criminology and criminal justice or LSE llm.
quote
Alexkos
In my view, if you are focused on criminology and criminal justice - there is nothing to think of - choose Oxford. Oxford traditionally doesn't have a LLM course, every employer in the legal world knows that.

And about LLM or MSc in human rights - well, it depends on what r you career plans. If you wanna concentrate on human rights only, while being solicitor - thats one thing, and brand and reputation of LSE would help you largely. If you wanna do commercial/corporate/commercial or anything else apart from human rights, then choose LLM and particular subjects you decide.

Well, thats only my opinion, and quite a subjective though.
In my view, if you are focused on criminology and criminal justice - there is nothing to think of - choose Oxford. Oxford traditionally doesn't have a LLM course, every employer in the legal world knows that.

And about LLM or MSc in human rights - well, it depends on what r you career plans. If you wanna concentrate on human rights only, while being solicitor - thats one thing, and brand and reputation of LSE would help you largely. If you wanna do commercial/corporate/commercial or anything else apart from human rights, then choose LLM and particular subjects you decide.

Well, thats only my opinion, and quite a subjective though.
quote
At this stage I am not sure that I wish to work specifically in crim but rather in the international sector, human rights, int criminal law etc. But I was wondering if the name of Oxford is just worth getting on my CV and whether it really matters as to the subject matter. In the LLM i would do crim, int law and human rights law most likely.

Alternatively I am thinking of reapplying at the end of the year for a more general law degree at ox/cam but not sure whether its worth wasting a year.

I think the brand at LSE may be better? So perhaps that would be the way to go?
At this stage I am not sure that I wish to work specifically in crim but rather in the international sector, human rights, int criminal law etc. But I was wondering if the name of Oxford is just worth getting on my CV and whether it really matters as to the subject matter. In the LLM i would do crim, int law and human rights law most likely.

Alternatively I am thinking of reapplying at the end of the year for a more general law degree at ox/cam but not sure whether its worth wasting a year.

I think the brand at LSE may be better? So perhaps that would be the way to go?

quote
Alexkos
I am not sure that LSEs brand is stronger than Oxfords. I tend to think that the situation is quite the contrary. The subjects which you would choose to study are important for employers, when your job is somehow connected to them, but not that crucial. I mean when you r applying for a job in The Int Crim Court, MSc from Oxford might be hugely beneficial, comparing to someone who studied int business law. But is not that crucial if you have LLM with subjects studied in the sphere of int crim law or int public law generally.

Mate, maybe you should make some research regarding in what Uni had the best experts in your field of interest studied?

However, if you are not sure about your specialization - then take an LLM at LSE - you might choose whichever subjects you want in October. I am not sure also whether it worth reapplying in a year. So, in other words, if you want to do int crime and int human rights, then I strongly recommend Ox. On the other hand, if you r not sure about your specialization and subjects you want to study, then LSE would be the best option.

I hope this would help you somehow ;)
I am not sure that LSEs brand is stronger than Oxfords. I tend to think that the situation is quite the contrary. The subjects which you would choose to study are important for employers, when your job is somehow connected to them, but not that crucial. I mean when you r applying for a job in The Int Crim Court, MSc from Oxford might be hugely beneficial, comparing to someone who studied int business law. But is not that crucial if you have LLM with subjects studied in the sphere of int crim law or int public law generally.

Mate, maybe you should make some research regarding in what Uni had the best experts in your field of interest studied?

However, if you are not sure about your specialization - then take an LLM at LSE - you might choose whichever subjects you want in October. I am not sure also whether it worth reapplying in a year. So, in other words, if you want to do int crime and int human rights, then I strongly recommend Ox. On the other hand, if you r not sure about your specialization and subjects you want to study, then LSE would be the best option.

I hope this would help you somehow ;)

quote
Sorry I meant to say the brand of LSE is better than Edinburgh in my opinion. I would def agree that Oxford has a better brand over LSE.

Thanks for your helpful reply.

I am leaning towards the MSc thats for sure!

Sorry for highjacking the post!
Sorry I meant to say the brand of LSE is better than Edinburgh in my opinion. I would def agree that Oxford has a better brand over LSE.

Thanks for your helpful reply.

I am leaning towards the MSc thats for sure!

Sorry for highjacking the post!

quote
malte

And about LLM or MSc in human rights - well, it depends on what r you career plans. If you wanna concentrate on human rights only, while being solicitor - thats one thing, and brand and reputation of LSE would help you largely. If you wanna do commercial/corporate/commercial or anything else apart from human rights, then choose LLM and particular subjects you decide.

Well, thats only my opinion, and quite a subjective though.


Thanks!
I have no ambition to concentrate on human rights only as a practitioner, it's really more of an academic interest (with a strong theoretical edge to it, actually). The same would be true for the LLM at Edinburgh - my motivation to do it is purely academic, so I do not intend to tailor it to my interests as a practitioner.

The question is really whether, even though my motivation behind doing a postgrad is purely academic, the title / name of the degree (or the name of the school) would have an impact on my prospects of becoming a practitioner.
<blockquote>
And about LLM or MSc in human rights - well, it depends on what r you career plans. If you wanna concentrate on human rights only, while being solicitor - thats one thing, and brand and reputation of LSE would help you largely. If you wanna do commercial/corporate/commercial or anything else apart from human rights, then choose LLM and particular subjects you decide.

Well, thats only my opinion, and quite a subjective though.</blockquote>

Thanks!
I have no ambition to concentrate on human rights only as a practitioner, it's really more of an academic interest (with a strong theoretical edge to it, actually). The same would be true for the LLM at Edinburgh - my motivation to do it is purely academic, so I do not intend to tailor it to my interests as a practitioner.

The question is really whether, even though my motivation behind doing a postgrad is purely academic, the title / name of the degree (or the name of the school) would have an impact on my prospects of becoming a practitioner.
quote
lakaria
I have similar concerns, Oxford msc in criminology and criminal justice or LSE llm.


Have you been admitted to any of the courses? I am also having similar issue of doing a general llm or Oxford msc in criminology.
<blockquote>I have similar concerns, Oxford msc in criminology and criminal justice or LSE llm. </blockquote>

Have you been admitted to any of the courses? I am also having similar issue of doing a general llm or Oxford msc in criminology.
quote
lakaria
I think Oxford is definitely better than LSE. I saw your posts in another forum. I can say that after working in big law firms previously, Oxford, Harvard, Cambridge etc are worldwide brand name. LSE or Columbia etc is good but not so famous that any Tom, Dick and Harry will know them. In the end, partners from big law firms don't care about the cert or content of your course but rather which school you are from.
I think Oxford is definitely better than LSE. I saw your posts in another forum. I can say that after working in big law firms previously, Oxford, Harvard, Cambridge etc are worldwide brand name. LSE or Columbia etc is good but not so famous that any Tom, Dick and Harry will know them. In the end, partners from big law firms don't care about the cert or content of your course but rather which school you are from.
quote
Hi there

Just a note - if you are planning to go into the corporate sector in England I think the name of your degree does make a difference. Training contracts are highly competitive and to get into the big firms you have to show your commitment to the corporate environment. I have friends that got training contracts with big commercial firms but they were able to justify their subject choices i.e. they took the human rights course at Edinburgh (which is an amazing course I highly recommend it) but also took courses such as international investment law etc thus she could still show that she was "committed to the interests of he firm."
My advice - if you're not sure what you want to do then go as broad as possible that way jobs are easier to come by and you might just realise what you want to specialise in through exposure to different areas.
Hi there

Just a note - if you are planning to go into the corporate sector in England I think the name of your degree does make a difference. Training contracts are highly competitive and to get into the big firms you have to show your commitment to the corporate environment. I have friends that got training contracts with big commercial firms but they were able to justify their subject choices i.e. they took the human rights course at Edinburgh (which is an amazing course I highly recommend it) but also took courses such as international investment law etc thus she could still show that she was "committed to the interests of he firm."
My advice - if you're not sure what you want to do then go as broad as possible that way jobs are easier to come by and you might just realise what you want to specialise in through exposure to different areas.
quote

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