Law of the sea


Jerbin
Thank you for click my

I wanna learn about law of the sea. it is not about shipping insurance and logistics but territorial waters. when i searched for law of the sea, i only found maritime law. i think people wander between law of the sea and maritime law.
i hope you suggest good path to learn law of the sea.
1. where is famous for law of the sea in UK?
2. I've career for 5 years in marine engineer. Does it help me to enter into the subject?

Thank you to read ^_______^
Thank you for click my

I wanna learn about law of the sea. it is not about shipping insurance and logistics but territorial waters. when i searched for law of the sea, i only found maritime law. i think people wander between law of the sea and maritime law.
i hope you suggest good path to learn law of the sea.
1. where is famous for law of the sea in UK?
2. I've career for 5 years in marine engineer. Does it help me to enter into the subject?

Thank you to read ^_______^
quote
flori
Hello Jerbin,

Thank you for click my

I wanna learn about law of the sea. it is not about shipping insurance and logistics but territorial waters. when i searched for law of the sea, i only found maritime law. i think people wander between law of the sea and maritime law.


In general: No. they don't. On the one hand we are talking about marine insurance, carriage of goods by sea, salvage, collisions etc., on the other hand we are talking about a part of public international law (fishing rights, economic zones etc.)

i hope you suggest good path to learn law of the sea.
1. where is famous for law of the sea in UK?
2. I've career for 5 years in marine engineer. Does it help me to enter into the subject?


1.:
http://www.southampton.ac.uk/law/postgraduate/taught_modules/laws6062_international_law_of_the_sea.page

https://intranet.swan.ac.uk/catalogue/default.asp?type=moddetail&dept=any&mod=LAGM06&ayr=15%2f16&psl=TB1%2b2&detailOnly=false

2: No.

Best greetings
flori
Hello Jerbin,

[quote]Thank you for click my

I wanna learn about law of the sea. it is not about shipping insurance and logistics but territorial waters. when i searched for law of the sea, i only found maritime law. i think people wander between law of the sea and maritime law.
[/quote]

In general: No. they don't. On the one hand we are talking about marine insurance, carriage of goods by sea, salvage, collisions etc., on the other hand we are talking about a part of public international law (fishing rights, economic zones etc.)
[quote]
i hope you suggest good path to learn law of the sea.
1. where is famous for law of the sea in UK?
2. I've career for 5 years in marine engineer. Does it help me to enter into the subject?
[/quote]

1.:
http://www.southampton.ac.uk/law/postgraduate/taught_modules/laws6062_international_law_of_the_sea.page

https://intranet.swan.ac.uk/catalogue/default.asp?type=moddetail&dept=any&mod=LAGM06&ayr=15%2f16&psl=TB1%2b2&detailOnly=false

2: No.

Best greetings
flori
quote
NapZ
I don't have much knowledge about LL.M.s in law of the sea, but I am replying to correct what has been said above:

"2: No."

The answer is actually yes. Even if there is no law background in marine engineering (I assume there is not), you still have experience in the maritime field, and for sure it can help you support your application, since it gives you practical experience. In your letter of motivation, you could emphasize your interest for the "maritime world" through your experience and that (if this is true) you can link your practical experience + the legal experience you would acquire with the LL.M.

It's as if a military wanted to have an LL.M. in law of armed conflict, or a businessman an LL.M. in international business law. Of course it gives you better chances of getting admitted (if you know how to use this at your advantage)!

You would also want to check out the LLM.s they offer in the Netherlands and Norway (I saw there are some they offer there, I would not be surprised if they were good).

Hope this helps!
I don't have much knowledge about LL.M.s in law of the sea, but I am replying to correct what has been said above:

"2: No."

The answer is actually yes. Even if there is no law background in marine engineering (I assume there is not), you still have experience in the maritime field, and for sure it can help you support your application, since it gives you practical experience. In your letter of motivation, you could emphasize your interest for the "maritime world" through your experience and that (if this is true) you can link your practical experience + the legal experience you would acquire with the LL.M.

It's as if a military wanted to have an LL.M. in law of armed conflict, or a businessman an LL.M. in international business law. Of course it gives you better chances of getting admitted (if you know how to use this at your advantage)!

You would also want to check out the LLM.s they offer in the Netherlands and Norway (I saw there are some they offer there, I would not be surprised if they were good).

Hope this helps!
quote

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