First class honours?


pipiripao
Hi all,

Does anyone know what first class honors equals to in US GPA? This is for oxbridge.

Thank you all very much in advance.

-P
Hi all,

Does anyone know what first class honors equals to in US GPA? This is for oxbridge.

Thank you all very much in advance.

-P
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adam81
(GPA = 3.7 - 4.0)
(GPA = 3.7 - 4.0)
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flightum
I've noticed that some of the UK schools' websites (including the Oxford MLF program) suggest that students should be a 3.7 on the U.S. grading system.

I'm really hoping this is simply a gross oversimplification, though, considering how wildly grade curves and student body quality vary at the 200+ law schools in the U.S. To piggy back on pipiripao's post (and my apologies for doing so), does anyone know if these programs take into account such considerations from U.S. applicants?

For example, I'm going to be graduating from a top-10 U.S. law school somewhere around the top 20-25% of my class, but unfortunately outside the top 10% (which is around 3.7). Without meaning to sound entitled (and merely for the sake of context -- my sincere apologies for when this does), I've been fortunate enough with those types of grades and the quality of my J.D. to have a large number of options for post-graduation employment at many of the world's top law firms; I'll be working at the leading global firm in my practice area -- a firm which generally requires students to have GPAs that are .2-.3 higher than required to land a position with any of the UK's Magic Circle firms -- because employers recognize the difficulty of achieving high marks at the very top schools and adjust their recruiting requirements accordingly. But if the Oxford admissions committee looks at my transcript without any context, I am afraid I will look very uncompetitive next to a top 10% student from a significantly lower-ranked school.

Perhaps this is just obnoxious complaining, but I am committed to an M&A/capital markets career and would hate to not be considered for these programs despite what is otherwise a not-terrible overall application. If anyone has any insight into whether the 3.7 range is a variable target based on the quality of the school and applicant's overall application, it would be greatly appreciated.
I've noticed that some of the UK schools' websites (including the Oxford MLF program) suggest that students should be a 3.7 on the U.S. grading system.

I'm really hoping this is simply a gross oversimplification, though, considering how wildly grade curves and student body quality vary at the 200+ law schools in the U.S. To piggy back on pipiripao's post (and my apologies for doing so), does anyone know if these programs take into account such considerations from U.S. applicants?

For example, I'm going to be graduating from a top-10 U.S. law school somewhere around the top 20-25% of my class, but unfortunately outside the top 10% (which is around 3.7). Without meaning to sound entitled (and merely for the sake of context -- my sincere apologies for when this does), I've been fortunate enough with those types of grades and the quality of my J.D. to have a large number of options for post-graduation employment at many of the world's top law firms; I'll be working at the leading global firm in my practice area -- a firm which generally requires students to have GPAs that are .2-.3 higher than required to land a position with any of the UK's Magic Circle firms -- because employers recognize the difficulty of achieving high marks at the very top schools and adjust their recruiting requirements accordingly. But if the Oxford admissions committee looks at my transcript without any context, I am afraid I will look very uncompetitive next to a top 10% student from a significantly lower-ranked school.

Perhaps this is just obnoxious complaining, but I am committed to an M&A/capital markets career and would hate to not be considered for these programs despite what is otherwise a not-terrible overall application. If anyone has any insight into whether the 3.7 range is a variable target based on the quality of the school and applicant's overall application, it would be greatly appreciated.
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Dubie
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