Contacts with Prof, Oxford MPhil in Law


Ju Liu

Hello everyone!

I have noticed that the website of the Oxford MPhil in Law has stated it is not necessary to make contact with the academic staff in advance.

However, is it still advisable to reach the preferable professors to make exchanges on, say, the availability of your planned dissertation? The website of DPhil in Law also suggested not to make contact, but such contact for Ph.D. candidates is somehow obviously necessary.

Therefore, would you contact with target professors? What is the common practice for MPhil applicants? Many thanks.

Hello everyone!

I have noticed that the website of the Oxford MPhil in Law has stated it is not necessary to make contact with the academic staff in advance.

However, is it still advisable to reach the preferable professors to make exchanges on, say, the availability of your planned dissertation? The website of DPhil in Law also suggested not to make contact, but such contact for Ph.D. candidates is somehow obviously necessary.

Therefore, would you contact with target professors? What is the common practice for MPhil applicants? Many thanks.
quote
Mombastic

There's nothing to lose. I know someone that contacted a professor to see if it's possible to consult with him about his PHD proposal and the prof agreed to.

There's nothing to lose. I know someone that contacted a professor to see if it's possible to consult with him about his PHD proposal and the prof agreed to.
quote
Geckmon

You can likely send an email to your prospective supervisor to gauge whether they would be interested in the research and, importantly, whether they are available to supervise your project. However, I would be cautious sending over either a full research proposal or a significant amount of the proposed research since this could be viewed as placing other candidates at a disadvantage (as a friend of mine found out the hard way).

That said, it really depends on the professor and I'm sure most would appreciate your proactive approach. I hope that helps! :)

[Edited by Geckmon on Jan 05, 2020]

You can likely send an email to your prospective supervisor to gauge whether they would be interested in the research and, importantly, whether they are available to supervise your project. However, I would be cautious sending over either a full research proposal or a significant amount of the proposed research since this could be viewed as placing other candidates at a disadvantage (as a friend of mine found out the hard way).

That said, it really depends on the professor and I'm sure most would appreciate your proactive approach. I hope that helps! :)
quote
Ju Liu

You can likely send an email to your prospective supervisor to gauge whether they would be interested in the research and, importantly, whether they are available to supervise your project. However, I would be cautious sending over either a full research proposal or a significant amount of the proposed research since this could be viewed as placing other candidates at a disadvantage (as a friend of mine found out the hard way).

That said, it really depends on the professor and I'm sure most would appreciate your proactive approach. I hope that helps! :)


Thanks a lot! I would then contact some of my preferable professors. :-)

[quote]You can likely send an email to your prospective supervisor to gauge whether they would be interested in the research and, importantly, whether they are available to supervise your project. However, I would be cautious sending over either a full research proposal or a significant amount of the proposed research since this could be viewed as placing other candidates at a disadvantage (as a friend of mine found out the hard way).

That said, it really depends on the professor and I'm sure most would appreciate your proactive approach. I hope that helps! :) [/quote]

Thanks a lot! I would then contact some of my preferable professors. :-)
quote
Geckmon

You can likely send an email to your prospective supervisor to gauge whether they would be interested in the research and, importantly, whether they are available to supervise your project. However, I would be cautious sending over either a full research proposal or a significant amount of the proposed research since this could be viewed as placing other candidates at a disadvantage (as a friend of mine found out the hard way).

That said, it really depends on the professor and I'm sure most would appreciate your proactive approach. I hope that helps! :)


Thanks a lot! I would then contact some of my preferable professors. :-)


Hi again - how did the 'first contact' go if (you don't mind my asking)?

[quote][quote]You can likely send an email to your prospective supervisor to gauge whether they would be interested in the research and, importantly, whether they are available to supervise your project. However, I would be cautious sending over either a full research proposal or a significant amount of the proposed research since this could be viewed as placing other candidates at a disadvantage (as a friend of mine found out the hard way).

That said, it really depends on the professor and I'm sure most would appreciate your proactive approach. I hope that helps! :) [/quote]

Thanks a lot! I would then contact some of my preferable professors. :-)[/quote]

Hi again - how did the 'first contact' go if (you don't mind my asking)?
quote
Ju Liu

You can likely send an email to your prospective supervisor to gauge whether they would be interested in the research and, importantly, whether they are available to supervise your project. However, I would be cautious sending over either a full research proposal or a significant amount of the proposed research since this could be viewed as placing other candidates at a disadvantage (as a friend of mine found out the hard way).

That said, it really depends on the professor and I'm sure most would appreciate your proactive approach. I hope that helps! :)


Thanks a lot! I would then contact some of my preferable professors. :-)


Hi again - how did the 'first contact' go if (you don't mind my asking)?


Bad luck. I have asked several professors. One has replied rather quickly, but he has retired from the formal position and would take no more postgraduates. Still waiting for other professors to reply.

[quote][quote][quote]You can likely send an email to your prospective supervisor to gauge whether they would be interested in the research and, importantly, whether they are available to supervise your project. However, I would be cautious sending over either a full research proposal or a significant amount of the proposed research since this could be viewed as placing other candidates at a disadvantage (as a friend of mine found out the hard way).

That said, it really depends on the professor and I'm sure most would appreciate your proactive approach. I hope that helps! :) [/quote]

Thanks a lot! I would then contact some of my preferable professors. :-)[/quote]

Hi again - how did the 'first contact' go if (you don't mind my asking)? [/quote]

Bad luck. I have asked several professors. One has replied rather quickly, but he has retired from the formal position and would take no more postgraduates. Still waiting for other professors to reply.
quote
Geckmon



Thanks a lot! I would then contact some of my preferable professors. :-)


Hi again - how did the 'first contact' go if (you don't mind my asking)?


Bad luck. I have asked several professors. One has replied rather quickly, but he has retired from the formal position and would take no more postgraduates. Still waiting for other professors to reply.


Ah, damn. I hope that you get a response soon. Which area of law are you looking to research?

[quote][quote][quote][quote]You can likely send an email to your prospective supervisor to gauge whether they would be interested in the research and, importantly, whether they are available to supervise your project. However, I would be cautious sending over either a full research proposal or a significant amount of the proposed research since this could be viewed as placing other candidates at a disadvantage (as a friend of mine found out the hard way).

That said, it really depends on the professor and I'm sure most would appreciate your proactive approach. I hope that helps! :) [/quote]

Thanks a lot! I would then contact some of my preferable professors. :-)[/quote]

Hi again - how did the 'first contact' go if (you don't mind my asking)? [/quote]

Bad luck. I have asked several professors. One has replied rather quickly, but he has retired from the formal position and would take no more postgraduates. Still waiting for other professors to reply.[/quote]

Ah, damn. I hope that you get a response soon. Which area of law are you looking to research?
quote

You can likely send an email to your prospective supervisor to gauge whether they would be interested in the research and, importantly, whether they are available to supervise your project. However, I would be cautious sending over either a full research proposal or a significant amount of the proposed research since this could be viewed as placing other candidates at a disadvantage (as a friend of mine found out the hard way).

That said, it really depends on the professor and I'm sure most would appreciate your proactive approach. I hope that helps! :)


Thanks a lot! I would then contact some of my preferable professors. :-)


Hi again - how did the 'first contact' go if (you don't mind my asking)?


Well, in my case the professor answered quite rapidly. He told me that my line of research was interesting and asked me to send him my research proposal so he can review it!

[quote][quote][quote]You can likely send an email to your prospective supervisor to gauge whether they would be interested in the research and, importantly, whether they are available to supervise your project. However, I would be cautious sending over either a full research proposal or a significant amount of the proposed research since this could be viewed as placing other candidates at a disadvantage (as a friend of mine found out the hard way).

That said, it really depends on the professor and I'm sure most would appreciate your proactive approach. I hope that helps! :) [/quote]

Thanks a lot! I would then contact some of my preferable professors. :-)[/quote]

Hi again - how did the 'first contact' go if (you don't mind my asking)? [/quote]

Well, in my case the professor answered quite rapidly. He told me that my line of research was interesting and asked me to send him my research proposal so he can review it!

quote

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