Advice about a career change later in life (GDL vs LLB vs Forget About It)


Dear All,

I am currently working in Asia in the area of Marketing. I am happy with my current job, but since an early age I had always had a strong interest in Law. Due to the situation of Law in Spain (you´ll probably have heard -not sure of it´s actual numbers of a rough calculation- that there are more lawyers in Madrid than in all of France), and seeing the poor prospects of many of my acquaintances that had a law degree, I decided to go for business instead of studying Spanish law. However, in recent years, the thought of studying English law has crossed my mind.
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As for my academic background, it is... complicated (skip this part if you don´t need to know that much).

A) 4-Year Degree in International Business (Taken at a public university but not legally recognised, it is one of the so-called spanish own-degrees, they are granted by the university but the gov´t won´t recognise them.), Grades equivalent to a 2:1
B) 3-Year Degree in Business (Taken in just 1 year, it is some sort of a top-up degree, taken mostly due to some legal requirements) grade equivalent to a 2:1
C) 2-year Master´s Degree in Chinese Studies, grade equivalent to a First.
D) 4-Year degree, business and marketing (top-up, obtained in 1 year, taken for the extra courses and to qualify for some things such as being a Spanish public servant, should I want to)

So, in brief, A was my original degree, but for different purposes I had to take B and D in 1 year each to qualify for some specific things. As for the grades, all undergrad qualifications a 2:1 and the MA a first.

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Now, the problems:

1. I'm close to 30 years old. I´m not that young anymore.

2. I am a Spanish native speaker and also fluent (as in being able to read -not yet write- contracts without problem, speaking fluently, etc) in Chinese. My English is supposed to be good (I got an A at Cambridge´s CPE; which is deemed by Oxford among others to be equivalent to a high level of English) but I´m not sure how English law firms look at non-native English speakers?

3. I am not sure of whether a GDL (distance), a graduate entry LLB (distance, such as open), or taking it a bit more slowly and going for a LLB is the best option. The GDL is undoubtedly the fastest and most expensive (I can still pay for it with my current income, though, so I wouldn't be getting in debt), but to my knowledge it is also seen as giving you a less in-depth knowledge of the law, and limiting your chances for applications for graduate studies. On the other hand the graduate LLB and the standard LLB would take both either a bit or a lot longer, but would probably give me a far deeper understanding of Law. Which route should I go?

4. Does somebody know if a lawyer in English law qualified through a GDL has the same chances of working as a European Lawyer (i.e. later practising Spanish law) and in 3 years obtaining the local Abogado professional title? Or is it restricted to people with a LLB?

5- Specialization: I have a personal interest in several areas:
- Intellectual Property Law
- Commercial Law
- Public Law (constitutional, international law, intl. institutions...)

6- While my academic credentials at university level, I have a feeling that my A-level equivalents (selectividad and bachillerato, in which I performed terribly and got the equivalent of a BCC or CCC) are going to be a big problem. Do this kind of qualifications totally disqualify you from a serious career in law? Should I just forget about it?


So, in the end, and seeing what I´ve been up to, do you think I should just forget about this whole law thing, or opt instead for a Spanish distance law degree and qualify there? Apart from the practice thing, I am honestly interested in Law as a personal academic interest, but the price of a legal education for the UK means that It´d only make sense to go for it if it was for practising.

Thanks to everybody!

Dear All,

I am currently working in Asia in the area of Marketing. I am happy with my current job, but since an early age I had always had a strong interest in Law. Due to the situation of Law in Spain (you´ll probably have heard -not sure of it´s actual numbers of a rough calculation- that there are more lawyers in Madrid than in all of France), and seeing the poor prospects of many of my acquaintances that had a law degree, I decided to go for business instead of studying Spanish law. However, in recent years, the thought of studying English law has crossed my mind.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

As for my academic background, it is... complicated (skip this part if you don´t need to know that much).

A) 4-Year Degree in International Business (Taken at a public university but not legally recognised, it is one of the so-called spanish own-degrees, they are granted by the university but the gov´t won´t recognise them.), Grades equivalent to a 2:1
B) 3-Year Degree in Business (Taken in just 1 year, it is some sort of a top-up degree, taken mostly due to some legal requirements) grade equivalent to a 2:1
C) 2-year Master´s Degree in Chinese Studies, grade equivalent to a First.
D) 4-Year degree, business and marketing (top-up, obtained in 1 year, taken for the extra courses and to qualify for some things such as being a Spanish public servant, should I want to)

So, in brief, A was my original degree, but for different purposes I had to take B and D in 1 year each to qualify for some specific things. As for the grades, all undergrad qualifications a 2:1 and the MA a first.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Now, the problems:

1. I'm close to 30 years old. I´m not that young anymore.

2. I am a Spanish native speaker and also fluent (as in being able to read -not yet write- contracts without problem, speaking fluently, etc) in Chinese. My English is supposed to be good (I got an A at Cambridge´s CPE; which is deemed by Oxford among others to be equivalent to a high level of English) but I´m not sure how English law firms look at non-native English speakers?

3. I am not sure of whether a GDL (distance), a graduate entry LLB (distance, such as open), or taking it a bit more slowly and going for a LLB is the best option. The GDL is undoubtedly the fastest and most expensive (I can still pay for it with my current income, though, so I wouldn't be getting in debt), but to my knowledge it is also seen as giving you a less in-depth knowledge of the law, and limiting your chances for applications for graduate studies. On the other hand the graduate LLB and the standard LLB would take both either a bit or a lot longer, but would probably give me a far deeper understanding of Law. Which route should I go?

4. Does somebody know if a lawyer in English law qualified through a GDL has the same chances of working as a European Lawyer (i.e. later practising Spanish law) and in 3 years obtaining the local Abogado professional title? Or is it restricted to people with a LLB?

5- Specialization: I have a personal interest in several areas:
- Intellectual Property Law
- Commercial Law
- Public Law (constitutional, international law, intl. institutions...)

6- While my academic credentials at university level, I have a feeling that my A-level equivalents (selectividad and bachillerato, in which I performed terribly and got the equivalent of a BCC or CCC) are going to be a big problem. Do this kind of qualifications totally disqualify you from a serious career in law? Should I just forget about it?


So, in the end, and seeing what I´ve been up to, do you think I should just forget about this whole law thing, or opt instead for a Spanish distance law degree and qualify there? Apart from the practice thing, I am honestly interested in Law as a personal academic interest, but the price of a legal education for the UK means that It´d only make sense to go for it if it was for practising.

Thanks to everybody!

quote
Eppendorf

Forget about it.

Forget about it.
quote

Thank you. Could you elaborate on why? Is there anything I could to do improve my prospects?

Thank you. Could you elaborate on why? Is there anything I could to do improve my prospects?
quote
Wheretogo_

My own perspective is law is a profession in decline. You have so many degrees already (which is such a good thing) and you would be looking at another 3 to 4 years of studies, debt and all for a profession that these days is becoming a document review mess.

Save your money and do something interesting with all the knowledge you have. You may even try doing a one year masters in law (business law) since you have a background in business as well.

My own perspective is law is a profession in decline. You have so many degrees already (which is such a good thing) and you would be looking at another 3 to 4 years of studies, debt and all for a profession that these days is becoming a document review mess.

Save your money and do something interesting with all the knowledge you have. You may even try doing a one year masters in law (business law) since you have a background in business as well.

quote
waywardMVR

My own perspective is law is a profession in decline. [...] for a profession that these days is becoming a document review mess.


I could not agree more.

<blockquote>My own perspective is law is a profession in decline. [...] for a profession that these days is becoming a document review mess.</blockquote>

I could not agree more.
quote

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