Masters in financial/economic law


Hi everyone!

Since everyone here is getting good advice on their LLM choices, I hope you guys will have a suggestion for me as well :)

With yet another enrollment term approaching, one who wishes to do an LLM in a finance/economic related field, faces a plethora of choices... There's obviously Oxford with it's MLF, Kings with International Financial Law, UCL with International Banking and Finance law, Queen Mary with MSc in Law and Finance, Cambridge with its MCL, ILF in Frankfurt, Harvard, Boston (heard it's a very good program), NYU, University of Singapore, etc.

An obvious choice would be applying to the most prestigious ones such as Oxford, Harvard, etc... However, taking into account the current job market where even Oxbridge or Ivy League graduates face difficulties in obtaining a job and the prospect of incurring a considerable amount of debt by going straight for the most prestigious programs makes the choice of a prospective student quite difficult. Since all of the programs are very interesting and have its benefits and drawbacks.

I'm quite drawn to the interdisciplinary programs where one would learn not only legal but also economic/financial subjects. These appeal greatly to me as I am deliberating of obtaining an MBA in the future, so having some academic knowledge in economics, finance, accounting would help me both in my MBA studies but also at work or making financial decisions (say, investing). However, I'm a bit concerned as such interdisciplinary degrees might seem a bit too generalist and I might miss out on having more detailed and specialized legal courses such as Kings or UCL. On the other hand, Kings, LSE, UCL seem a bit too pricey for what you get - 4 full taught modules in the course of one year, while in comparison at ILF you'd get 6 full law courses as well as 4 courses in economics, finance + an internship, or MLF - 4 finance/economic courses and 2-3 law courses.

Any thoughts, input or deliberations would be greatly appreciated :)
Hi everyone!

Since everyone here is getting good advice on their LLM choices, I hope you guys will have a suggestion for me as well :)

With yet another enrollment term approaching, one who wishes to do an LLM in a finance/economic related field, faces a plethora of choices... There's obviously Oxford with it's MLF, Kings with International Financial Law, UCL with International Banking and Finance law, Queen Mary with MSc in Law and Finance, Cambridge with its MCL, ILF in Frankfurt, Harvard, Boston (heard it's a very good program), NYU, University of Singapore, etc.

An obvious choice would be applying to the most prestigious ones such as Oxford, Harvard, etc... However, taking into account the current job market where even Oxbridge or Ivy League graduates face difficulties in obtaining a job and the prospect of incurring a considerable amount of debt by going straight for the most prestigious programs makes the choice of a prospective student quite difficult. Since all of the programs are very interesting and have its benefits and drawbacks.

I'm quite drawn to the interdisciplinary programs where one would learn not only legal but also economic/financial subjects. These appeal greatly to me as I am deliberating of obtaining an MBA in the future, so having some academic knowledge in economics, finance, accounting would help me both in my MBA studies but also at work or making financial decisions (say, investing). However, I'm a bit concerned as such interdisciplinary degrees might seem a bit too generalist and I might miss out on having more detailed and specialized legal courses such as Kings or UCL. On the other hand, Kings, LSE, UCL seem a bit too pricey for what you get - 4 full taught modules in the course of one year, while in comparison at ILF you'd get 6 full law courses as well as 4 courses in economics, finance + an internship, or MLF - 4 finance/economic courses and 2-3 law courses.

Any thoughts, input or deliberations would be greatly appreciated :)
quote
No thoughts from anyone? Even currently enrolled students or alumni of the abovementioned programs? :)
No thoughts from anyone? Even currently enrolled students or alumni of the abovementioned programs? :)
quote
Nic25
I believe, I would decide for King's College in London. It is a strong asset that the course is in London. If you want to stay on the continent. The LL.M. of Zurich in Banking and Finance Law is also considerable.
I believe, I would decide for King's College in London. It is a strong asset that the course is in London. If you want to stay on the continent. The LL.M. of Zurich in Banking and Finance Law is also considerable.
quote
aastha
Anyone from India applying for ILF 2013?
Anyone from India applying for ILF 2013?
quote
Hi: I am applying to ILF for 2013. I'm from the United States. I have a quesiton about the application process. Is it necessary to get transcripts notarized if they are already certified by the school? For example, my university and law school transcripts are certified and sent to me in sealed envelopes directly from the school. Do I also need to get them certified by a notary? Also, I was wondering if anyone from the States actually sent in copies of their high school transcripts? I've been out of high school for over 10 years and have no clue where to find my high school diploma -- you just don't really need a high school diploma to apply for graduate programs in the States once you've already obtained your University degree.

Also, I was wondering if anyone knows how difficult it is to get accepted into ILF. I graduated in the top 15% of my law school class but had quite average grades in my University and High School program.

Thanks!! And good luck to everyone who is applying!
Hi: I am applying to ILF for 2013. I'm from the United States. I have a quesiton about the application process. Is it necessary to get transcripts notarized if they are already certified by the school? For example, my university and law school transcripts are certified and sent to me in sealed envelopes directly from the school. Do I also need to get them certified by a notary? Also, I was wondering if anyone from the States actually sent in copies of their high school transcripts? I've been out of high school for over 10 years and have no clue where to find my high school diploma -- you just don't really need a high school diploma to apply for graduate programs in the States once you've already obtained your University degree.

Also, I was wondering if anyone knows how difficult it is to get accepted into ILF. I graduated in the top 15% of my law school class but had quite average grades in my University and High School program.

Thanks!! And good luck to everyone who is applying!
quote
aastha
Try contacting Ms. Jennifer ( schmid@ilf.uni-frankfurt.de)

She is very helpful. Will answer all your queries.
Try contacting Ms. Jennifer ( schmid@ilf.uni-frankfurt.de)

She is very helpful. Will answer all your queries.
quote

Reply to Post

Related Law Schools

Oxford, United Kingdom 736 Followers 783 Discussions
Oxford, United Kingdom 28 Followers 40 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 690 Followers 878 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 519 Followers 865 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 814 Followers 808 Discussions
Cambridge, United Kingdom 674 Followers 705 Discussions
Frankfurt am Main, Germany 162 Followers 99 Discussions
Cambridge, Massachusetts 1018 Followers 852 Discussions
Boston, Massachusetts 317 Followers 336 Discussions
New York City, New York 1850 Followers 1527 Discussions
Singapore 239 Followers 218 Discussions
Zürich, Switzerland 74 Followers 16 Discussions

Related Articles

LL.M. Programs in Financial Regulation

Jan 04, 2013

Can specialized programs help lawyers seeking to work in one of the hottest fields of law?

The LL.M. in Finance and Banking Law

Jun 01, 2009

With no bull market in sight, does a specialized finance LL.M. still make sense?

More Articles