LLB from India and LLM from U.K/U.S/Singapore


asplaw28
Does a basic law degree from an Indian University and an LLM from a university in U.K. or U.S or even Singapore help secure jobs as a legal counsel in companies in any of these 3 countries? If yes, what are the requirements?
Does a basic law degree from an Indian University and an LLM from a university in U.K. or U.S or even Singapore help secure jobs as a legal counsel in companies in any of these 3 countries? If yes, what are the requirements?
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chicken so...
I think this is usually very complicated and not possible for most students.

Good advice in this article on England:

https://llm-guide.com/articles/living-an-international-life-in-england

On recent changes in visa laws: "Fagan says the changes have made it more difficult for Essex students to pursue internships while at school. But he also says the changes haven't caused enrollment to drop or driven international students away from LL.M. programs in the country.

That could be because many international students want to come to England to study, learn the country's legal system and language, but then move on instead of trying to stay and work in the country."

There's a lot of discussion on this in the board already. For example:

https://llm-guide.com/board/uk-ireland/job-prospects-after-ucl-llm-173983

From a UCL grad: "If you aren't qualified in the UK and you're doing the LLM hoping it'll open you the doors to a legal job in the UK, then save the time and the money and go do something else."

It's really true that legal jobs are scarce in these countries and tend to go to domestics. However, it's also a matter of qualification. If you want to qualify to practice law as a solicitor/barrister in the UK, you'll need to do a BPTC (bar practice training course) - and to practice law in the US you need to of course take a bar exam. Would your LLM would prepare you for pursuing these qualifications? Maybe, maybe not.

There are exceptions - for instance if a Big Law firm wants to expand into India, and sees that you have valuable experience in Indian law, they might hire you for your connections. But they'll most likely transition you back to India after a couple years at a main office in London/NYC or wherever.

In sum, if you want to transition abroad then getting an LL.M. usually isn't the best way to go about this. You'd probably have more luck with an MBA and aiming for a non-law job.
I think this is usually very complicated and not possible for most students.

Good advice in this article on England:

https://llm-guide.com/articles/living-an-international-life-in-england

On recent changes in visa laws: "Fagan says the changes have made it more difficult for Essex students to pursue internships while at school. But he also says the changes haven't caused enrollment to drop or driven international students away from LL.M. programs in the country.

That could be because many international students want to come to England to study, learn the country's legal system and language, but then move on instead of trying to stay and work in the country."

There's a lot of discussion on this in the board already. For example:

https://llm-guide.com/board/uk-ireland/job-prospects-after-ucl-llm-173983

From a UCL grad: "If you aren't qualified in the UK and you're doing the LLM hoping it'll open you the doors to a legal job in the UK, then save the time and the money and go do something else."

It's really true that legal jobs are scarce in these countries and tend to go to domestics. However, it's also a matter of qualification. If you want to qualify to practice law as a solicitor/barrister in the UK, you'll need to do a BPTC (bar practice training course) - and to practice law in the US you need to of course take a bar exam. Would your LLM would prepare you for pursuing these qualifications? Maybe, maybe not.

There are exceptions - for instance if a Big Law firm wants to expand into India, and sees that you have valuable experience in Indian law, they might hire you for your connections. But they'll most likely transition you back to India after a couple years at a main office in London/NYC or wherever.

In sum, if you want to transition abroad then getting an LL.M. usually isn't the best way to go about this. You'd probably have more luck with an MBA and aiming for a non-law job.
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asplaw28
Thank you chicken soup!

The articles that you shared all talk about practicing in the different countries. It is undoubtedly difficult to do so with a basic Indian law degree. However, working in the legal department of any company( not a law firm), wouldn't just be restricted to local lawyers. If I did my LL.M in International commercial or business laws and had a good amount of work ex with an MNC in India, wouldn't that help me or give me an edge to work for a company based in the U.K, or U.S or Singapore?
Thank you chicken soup!

The articles that you shared all talk about practicing in the different countries. It is undoubtedly difficult to do so with a basic Indian law degree. However, working in the legal department of any company( not a law firm), wouldn't just be restricted to local lawyers. If I did my LL.M in International commercial or business laws and had a good amount of work ex with an MNC in India, wouldn't that help me or give me an edge to work for a company based in the U.K, or U.S or Singapore?
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flori
No, at least not in 95% of the cases. And the 5% would get the job without the LLM as well.
Bye
Flori
No, at least not in 95% of the cases. And the 5% would get the job without the LLM as well.
Bye
Flori
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asplaw28
That means I would have to come back to India. So is practising a better option abroad?
That means I would have to come back to India. So is practising a better option abroad?
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If you are intent on working in the U.S., you really will need a JD degree. At Drexel, we offer what we call the Global Access JD for students who have an LLB (or even an LLM) from outside the U.S. No LSAT is required and we can give you up to one year's credit for the work you did on your LLB so that you can complete your JD in as little as two years. More info on our website.

Leslie A. Friedman
Director, Dean's Office

Thomas R. Kline School of Law
Drexel University
3320 Market Street, Suite 452
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Tel: 215.571.4729 | Fax: 215.571.4763
drexel.edu/law

Skype: leslieafriedman

[Edited by LeslieAFriedman on Aug 18, 2016]

If you are intent on working in the U.S., you really will need a JD degree. At Drexel, we offer what we call the Global Access JD for students who have an LLB (or even an LLM) from outside the U.S. No LSAT is required and we can give you up to one year's credit for the work you did on your LLB so that you can complete your JD in as little as two years. More info on our website.

Leslie A. Friedman
Director, Dean's Office

Thomas R. Kline School of Law
Drexel University
3320 Market Street, Suite 452
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Tel: 215.571.4729 | Fax: 215.571.4763
drexel.edu/law

Skype: leslieafriedman


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asplaw28
So how is LLM beneficial apart from the knowledge aspect?
So how is LLM beneficial apart from the knowledge aspect?
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