Employable LLMs


Brainy Smu...

From the data gathered, it seems these three options are the only lucrative LLMs with the highest rate of employment:

- Alternative Dispute Resolution

- Intellectual Property

- Taxation

If you take the time to research the legal market, you will understand these are the only feasible specialties. This is up for debate if you oppose.

Cheers.

From the data gathered, it seems these three options are the only lucrative LLMs with the highest rate of employment:

- Alternative Dispute Resolution

- Intellectual Property

- Taxation

If you take the time to research the legal market, you will understand these are the only feasible specialties. This is up for debate if you oppose.

Cheers.
quote

thank you for the research.

thank you for the research.
quote
Eurofan

thanks a lot! what do you mean by ADR - both mediation and arbitration? I have heard there is a slight tendency to employ llms in the arbitration sector.

what about corporate law?

thanks a lot! what do you mean by ADR - both mediation and arbitration? I have heard there is a slight tendency to employ llms in the arbitration sector.

what about corporate law?
quote

I think ADR has become a satisfied branch.

I think ADR has become a satisfied branch.
quote
spaniensis

thanks a lot! what do you mean by ADR - both mediation and arbitration? I have heard there is a slight tendency to employ llms in the arbitration sector.

what about corporate law?


In the UK with Alternative Dispute Resolutions (ADR) people think in Mediationi. n the US ADR is understood as Mediation and Arbitration. I am pursuing that speciality at NYU which has in my opinion one of the best program for that (the international business regulation, litigation and arbitration)... the best law school in ADR though is Peperdine. HLS is also highly regarded in Mediation but not in arbitration. CLS is also very strong in Arbitration.

<blockquote>thanks a lot! what do you mean by ADR - both mediation and arbitration? I have heard there is a slight tendency to employ llms in the arbitration sector.

what about corporate law?</blockquote>

In the UK with Alternative Dispute Resolutions (ADR) people think in Mediationi. n the US ADR is understood as Mediation and Arbitration. I am pursuing that speciality at NYU which has in my opinion one of the best program for that (the international business regulation, litigation and arbitration)... the best law school in ADR though is Peperdine. HLS is also highly regarded in Mediation but not in arbitration. CLS is also very strong in Arbitration.
quote
Brainy Smu...

Yes ADR inferring:
- Mediation,
- Arbitration,
- Adjudication,
- Ombudsmen,
- Conciliation,
- Online Dispute Resolution (ODR)

In considering corporate law. ADR is an useful specialty to have under your belt with regards to dispute resolution between companies. There are several fellowships that are interrelated in the practice of ADR. A good place to look for ADR-related materials and provisions would be the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) located here: http://www.iccwbo.org/. However, you can go anywhere in the world with ADR. As long as transnational corporations want to find an alternative in not going to court, ADR will always have a precedent.

Yes ADR inferring:
- Mediation,
- Arbitration,
- Adjudication,
- Ombudsmen,
- Conciliation,
- Online Dispute Resolution (ODR)

In considering corporate law. ADR is an useful specialty to have under your belt with regards to dispute resolution between companies. There are several fellowships that are interrelated in the practice of ADR. A good place to look for ADR-related materials and provisions would be the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) located here: http://www.iccwbo.org/. However, you can go anywhere in the world with ADR. As long as transnational corporations want to find an alternative in not going to court, ADR will always have a precedent.
quote
myadav

From the data gathered, it seems these three options are the only lucrative LLMs with the highest rate of employment:

- Alternative Dispute Resolution

- Intellectual Property

- Taxation

If you take the time to research the legal market, you will understand these are the only feasible specialties. This is up for debate if you oppose.

Cheers.

lol.

<blockquote>From the data gathered, it seems these three options are the only lucrative LLMs with the highest rate of employment:

- Alternative Dispute Resolution

- Intellectual Property

- Taxation

If you take the time to research the legal market, you will understand these are the only feasible specialties. This is up for debate if you oppose.

Cheers.</blockquote>
lol.
quote

Yes ADR inferring:
- Mediation,
- Arbitration,
- Adjudication,
- Ombudsmen,
- Conciliation,
- Online Dispute Resolution (ODR)

In considering corporate law. ADR is an useful specialty to have under your belt with regards to dispute resolution between companies. There are several fellowships that are interrelated in the practice of ADR. A good place to look for ADR-related materials and provisions would be the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) located here: http://www.iccwbo.org/. However, you can go anywhere in the world with ADR. As long as transnational corporations want to find an alternative in not going to court, ADR will always have a precedent.

Hi,
I actually would like to focus on IP law and so I am in between : Berkeley vs. Chicago
Berkeley got the 1 st rank in IP law but Chicago is better in general ranking and offers smaller classes, though seems to be less famous out of USA.
What do you think?

<blockquote>Yes ADR inferring:
- Mediation,
- Arbitration,
- Adjudication,
- Ombudsmen,
- Conciliation,
- Online Dispute Resolution (ODR)

In considering corporate law. ADR is an useful specialty to have under your belt with regards to dispute resolution between companies. There are several fellowships that are interrelated in the practice of ADR. A good place to look for ADR-related materials and provisions would be the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) located here: http://www.iccwbo.org/. However, you can go anywhere in the world with ADR. As long as transnational corporations want to find an alternative in not going to court, ADR will always have a precedent. </blockquote>
Hi,
I actually would like to focus on IP law and so I am in between : Berkeley vs. Chicago
Berkeley got the 1 st rank in IP law but Chicago is better in general ranking and offers smaller classes, though seems to be less famous out of USA.
What do you think?
quote
Brainy Smu...

Yes ADR inferring:
- Mediation,
- Arbitration,
- Adjudication,
- Ombudsmen,
- Conciliation,
- Online Dispute Resolution (ODR)

In considering corporate law. ADR is an useful specialty to have under your belt with regards to dispute resolution between companies. There are several fellowships that are interrelated in the practice of ADR. A good place to look for ADR-related materials and provisions would be the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) located here: http://www.iccwbo.org/. However, you can go anywhere in the world with ADR. As long as transnational corporations want to find an alternative in not going to court, ADR will always have a precedent.

Hi,
I actually would like to focus on IP law and so I am in between : Berkeley vs. Chicago
Berkeley got the 1 st rank in IP law but Chicago is better in general ranking and offers smaller classes, though seems to be less famous out of USA.
What do you think?



Overall, I agree that Chicago does have a comparative advantage over Berkeley in other law related courses. But looking into the market of IP. Berkeley, however, reigns over Chicago. Being that it has proximity to silicon valley and the city of San Francisco. IP has become a very lucrative specialty in law. Wherever you go, you will be OK. But the downfall of going to the US for an LLM is the lack of positions. Keep this in mind, Berkeley is ideal for IP but your chances to land an IP-related position will increase outside the state of California.

Hope this helps.

<blockquote><blockquote>Yes ADR inferring:
- Mediation,
- Arbitration,
- Adjudication,
- Ombudsmen,
- Conciliation,
- Online Dispute Resolution (ODR)

In considering corporate law. ADR is an useful specialty to have under your belt with regards to dispute resolution between companies. There are several fellowships that are interrelated in the practice of ADR. A good place to look for ADR-related materials and provisions would be the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) located here: http://www.iccwbo.org/. However, you can go anywhere in the world with ADR. As long as transnational corporations want to find an alternative in not going to court, ADR will always have a precedent. </blockquote>
Hi,
I actually would like to focus on IP law and so I am in between : Berkeley vs. Chicago
Berkeley got the 1 st rank in IP law but Chicago is better in general ranking and offers smaller classes, though seems to be less famous out of USA.
What do you think?</blockquote>


Overall, I agree that Chicago does have a comparative advantage over Berkeley in other law related courses. But looking into the market of IP. Berkeley, however, reigns over Chicago. Being that it has proximity to silicon valley and the city of San Francisco. IP has become a very lucrative specialty in law. Wherever you go, you will be OK. But the downfall of going to the US for an LLM is the lack of positions. Keep this in mind, Berkeley is ideal for IP but your chances to land an IP-related position will increase outside the state of California.

Hope this helps.
quote
Tristan

From the data gathered, it seems these three options are the only lucrative LLMs with the highest rate of employment:

- Alternative Dispute Resolution

- Intellectual Property

- Taxation

If you take the time to research the legal market, you will understand these are the only feasible specialties. This is up for debate if you oppose.

Cheers.


As I mentioned in another post, if you wish to be competitive candidate in the US in the area of IP law, you better have at least a bachelor's degree in engineering and/or computer science (in the case of nature sciences like biochem, physics at least a master's or higher) and preferably the patent bar. IP in the US, at the moment, is very heavy on patent work (not as much on copyright and trademark), hence the aforementioned requirements. An LL.B. (or equivalent from a foreign U) and an LL.M. will, generally, not get you the foot in the proverbial door.

<blockquote>From the data gathered, it seems these three options are the only lucrative LLMs with the highest rate of employment:

- Alternative Dispute Resolution

- Intellectual Property

- Taxation

If you take the time to research the legal market, you will understand these are the only feasible specialties. This is up for debate if you oppose.

Cheers.</blockquote>

As I mentioned in another post, if you wish to be competitive candidate in the US in the area of IP law, you better have at least a bachelor's degree in engineering and/or computer science (in the case of nature sciences like biochem, physics at least a master's or higher) and preferably the patent bar. IP in the US, at the moment, is very heavy on patent work (not as much on copyright and trademark), hence the aforementioned requirements. An LL.B. (or equivalent from a foreign U) and an LL.M. will, generally, not get you the foot in the proverbial door.
quote
Brainy Smu...

From the data gathered, it seems these three options are the only lucrative LLMs with the highest rate of employment:

- Alternative Dispute Resolution

- Intellectual Property

- Taxation

If you take the time to research the legal market, you will understand these are the only feasible specialties. This is up for debate if you oppose.

Cheers.


As I mentioned in another post, if you wish to be competitive candidate in the US in the area of IP law, you better have at least a bachelor's degree in engineering and/or computer science (in the case of nature sciences like biochem, physics at least a master's or higher) and preferably the patent bar. IP in the US, at the moment, is very heavy on patent work (not as much on copyright and trademark), hence the aforementioned requirements. An LL.B. (or equivalent from a foreign U) and an LL.M. will, generally, not get you the foot in the proverbial door.


Very true. However, that is where experience comes into view.

No experience = no job.

No experience + education = maybe

Some experience + education = chance

Experience + education = job

The listing I post have the highest rate of employment. Meaning; the figures are low if you are competitive but there is a chance of getting in. Just having an education does not make the cut anymore. If you lack experience in the area of IP (no background), than I grandly concur with your rebut.

Kind regards.

<blockquote><blockquote>From the data gathered, it seems these three options are the only lucrative LLMs with the highest rate of employment:

- Alternative Dispute Resolution

- Intellectual Property

- Taxation

If you take the time to research the legal market, you will understand these are the only feasible specialties. This is up for debate if you oppose.

Cheers.</blockquote>

As I mentioned in another post, if you wish to be competitive candidate in the US in the area of IP law, you better have at least a bachelor's degree in engineering and/or computer science (in the case of nature sciences like biochem, physics at least a master's or higher) and preferably the patent bar. IP in the US, at the moment, is very heavy on patent work (not as much on copyright and trademark), hence the aforementioned requirements. An LL.B. (or equivalent from a foreign U) and an LL.M. will, generally, not get you the foot in the proverbial door. </blockquote>

Very true. However, that is where experience comes into view.

No experience = no job.

No experience + education = maybe

Some experience + education = chance

Experience + education = job

The listing I post have the highest rate of employment. Meaning; the figures are low if you are competitive but there is a chance of getting in. Just having an education does not make the cut anymore. If you lack experience in the area of IP (no background), than I grandly concur with your rebut.

Kind regards.
quote
Tristan

From the data gathered, it seems these three options are the only lucrative LLMs with the highest rate of employment:

- Alternative Dispute Resolution

- Intellectual Property

- Taxation

If you take the time to research the legal market, you will understand these are the only feasible specialties. This is up for debate if you oppose.

Cheers.


As I mentioned in another post, if you wish to be competitive candidate in the US in the area of IP law, you better have at least a bachelor's degree in engineering and/or computer science (in the case of nature sciences like biochem, physics at least a master's or higher) and preferably the patent bar. IP in the US, at the moment, is very heavy on patent work (not as much on copyright and trademark), hence the aforementioned requirements. An LL.B. (or equivalent from a foreign U) and an LL.M. will, generally, not get you the foot in the proverbial door.


Very true. However, that is where experience comes into view.

No experience = no job.

No experience + education = maybe

Some experience + education = chance

Experience + education = job

The listing I post have the highest rate of employment. Meaning; the figures are low if you are competitive but there is a chance of getting in. Just having an education does not make the cut anymore. If you lack experience in the area of IP (no background), I grandly concur with your rebut.

Kind regards.


Actually, in the area of patent law, experience is not per se necessary so long as you have the right education. I have two friends, both of whom got jobs with pretty big firms right out of law school, and neither of which had really any experience, save for two summer internships between their 1st and 2nd years in a JD program. One has a Ph.D. in biochemistry as well as the patent bar (two short summer internships) and had a LOT of interviews; the other had a bachelor's and a master's in electrical engineering, the patent bar, and one summer internship. One went to a top 50 law school and the other to a law school ranked in the 60s. It was their background in the sciences, and the patent bar, that had firms chasing after them. Sure, if you have experience, in addition to the right schooling, you'll have a great advantage but not a lot of students have that. My point was that an LL.M. will not open the door into patent law, at least in the U.S. These days, in order to be competitive in the area of patent law (which makes up a huge percentage of the case load in IP work these days) you have to have the right undergraduate education, namely engineering/hard sciences. An LL.M. in IP will, generally, not make you a more attractive applicant if your undergraduate is an LL.B., even if you have experience.

<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>From the data gathered, it seems these three options are the only lucrative LLMs with the highest rate of employment:

- Alternative Dispute Resolution

- Intellectual Property

- Taxation

If you take the time to research the legal market, you will understand these are the only feasible specialties. This is up for debate if you oppose.

Cheers.</blockquote>

As I mentioned in another post, if you wish to be competitive candidate in the US in the area of IP law, you better have at least a bachelor's degree in engineering and/or computer science (in the case of nature sciences like biochem, physics at least a master's or higher) and preferably the patent bar. IP in the US, at the moment, is very heavy on patent work (not as much on copyright and trademark), hence the aforementioned requirements. An LL.B. (or equivalent from a foreign U) and an LL.M. will, generally, not get you the foot in the proverbial door. </blockquote>

Very true. However, that is where experience comes into view.

No experience = no job.

No experience + education = maybe

Some experience + education = chance

Experience + education = job

The listing I post have the highest rate of employment. Meaning; the figures are low if you are competitive but there is a chance of getting in. Just having an education does not make the cut anymore. If you lack experience in the area of IP (no background), I grandly concur with your rebut.

Kind regards.</blockquote>

Actually, in the area of patent law, experience is not per se necessary so long as you have the right education. I have two friends, both of whom got jobs with pretty big firms right out of law school, and neither of which had really any experience, save for two summer internships between their 1st and 2nd years in a JD program. One has a Ph.D. in biochemistry as well as the patent bar (two short summer internships) and had a LOT of interviews; the other had a bachelor's and a master's in electrical engineering, the patent bar, and one summer internship. One went to a top 50 law school and the other to a law school ranked in the 60s. It was their background in the sciences, and the patent bar, that had firms chasing after them. Sure, if you have experience, in addition to the right schooling, you'll have a great advantage but not a lot of students have that. My point was that an LL.M. will not open the door into patent law, at least in the U.S. These days, in order to be competitive in the area of patent law (which makes up a huge percentage of the case load in IP work these days) you have to have the right undergraduate education, namely engineering/hard sciences. An LL.M. in IP will, generally, not make you a more attractive applicant if your undergraduate is an LL.B., even if you have experience.
quote

I may partially agree. But luckily I have specialization about IT other than law in practice.

I may partially agree. But luckily I have specialization about IT other than law in practice.
quote

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