BPP Law School: LLM or LPC?


I am a student studying towards a combined bachelor and master in Law in Italy, interested in international legal career within golden circle firms.
BPP has been recently recognized as a full university - so able to issue regular degree certifications - and even if it is not listed among the leading universities rankings on llmguide website, I'm wondering how good it could be to pursue an LLM there.
LinkedIn ex-alumni statistics are outstanding and if you check the people section of the golden circle firms it's always the top uni.
Do you think people get in into golden circle firms because of LLM or LPC?
Do you think it would be better to choose Oxforbridge, LSE, Kings for an LLM rather than BPP? If yes, why?
How about the LPC program? do you suggest to take it at BPP? why? and if yes, is it better after the bachelor or after the LLM?
I saw that they also offer an LLM LPC (sounds like a mixed program), could it be the solution?
Thanks in advance!

[Edited by Federico Lo Bianco on Apr 25, 2020]

I am a student studying towards a combined bachelor and master in Law in Italy, interested in international legal career within golden circle firms.
BPP has been recently recognized as a full university - so able to issue regular degree certifications - and even if it is not listed among the leading universities rankings on llmguide website, I'm wondering how good it could be to pursue an LLM there.
LinkedIn ex-alumni statistics are outstanding and if you check the people section of the golden circle firms it's always the top uni.
Do you think people get in into golden circle firms because of LLM or LPC?
Do you think it would be better to choose Oxforbridge, LSE, Kings for an LLM rather than BPP? If yes, why?
How about the LPC program? do you suggest to take it at BPP? why? and if yes, is it better after the bachelor or after the LLM?
I saw that they also offer an LLM LPC (sounds like a mixed program), could it be the solution?
Thanks in advance!
quote

LLMs in general are not the most important points for hiring. Your undergraduate degree and soft skills are. A more prestigious LLM is going to go further for you anyway if that’s why you want it.

The LPC is being abolished next year. It’ll be replaced by the SQE. Do not take an LPC course, it’s a waste of time and money.

LLMs in general are not the most important points for hiring. Your undergraduate degree and soft skills are. A more prestigious LLM is going to go further for you anyway if that’s why you want it.

The LPC is being abolished next year. It’ll be replaced by the SQE. Do not take an LPC course, it’s a waste of time and money.
quote

How about if I have an LLB with outstanding scores but from a not well-known uni?
Do you suggest me LLM and then SQE or SQE only?

How about if I have an LLB with outstanding scores but from a not well-known uni?
Do you suggest me LLM and then SQE or SQE only?
quote

If your LLB from your home country was obtained with high scores, I’m sure they’ll consider it and weigh it with the relative strengths of the university. If you’re moving to another country, you will have trouble selling yourself no matter what since law is just not a very mobile career and the legal systems are fundamentally different.
The LLM might give you some networking opportunity, and if you pick mostly common law courses it may help you study a little bit for the SQE, but I think you will need to take a preparation course for that, which is what most people will be doing. 
The point is this - the LPC is a waste As of now. If you are going to do an LLM, doing it a major research university like LSE, Kings, UCL, SOAS, Queen Mary, Oxbridge or any Russell Group uni will be better than doing an LLM with BPP or University of Law, frankly.

If your LLB from your home country was obtained with high scores, I’m sure they’ll consider it and weigh it with the relative strengths of the university. If you’re moving to another country, you will have trouble selling yourself no matter what since law is just not a very mobile career and the legal systems are fundamentally different.<div><br></div><div>The LLM might give you some networking opportunity, and if you pick mostly common law courses it may help you study a little bit for the SQE, but I think you will need to take a preparation course for that, which is what most people will be doing.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>The point is this - the LPC is a waste As of now. If you are going to do an LLM, doing it a major research university like LSE, Kings, UCL, SOAS, Queen Mary, Oxbridge or any Russell Group uni will be better than doing an LLM with BPP or University of Law, frankly.</div>
quote

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