MIDS for 2010


DianaBerk
It depends on what you want to do. If you really want to specialize in arbitration, one or two courses at NYU or other university will not add anything to your background... arbitration is very complex for only a couple of courses (moreover if you want to manage the private, the public, and the mixed arbitration proceedings).... I dont want to be rude, but if you think that one or two coruses is enought, it is because probably you dont know too much of arbitration...

Geneva is as international as NY and London, but of course is much smaller and boring! However, Geneva is one of the most important centers of arbitration of the world. For sure, its more important than NY, and probably as important as London and Paris.

Last but not least, the faculty of MIDS is amazing... but again, you have to be familiar with the arbitration world to realize that you will not find that faculty in any other program of the world. Regarding the admision process, I dont know how competitive is, im still waiting for an answer, but if you check the background of the alumni in the website, most of the students have a very intresting and diverse background!
It depends on what you want to do. If you really want to specialize in arbitration, one or two courses at NYU or other university will not add anything to your background... arbitration is very complex for only a couple of courses (moreover if you want to manage the private, the public, and the mixed arbitration proceedings).... I dont want to be rude, but if you think that one or two coruses is enought, it is because probably you dont know too much of arbitration...

Geneva is as international as NY and London, but of course is much smaller and boring! However, Geneva is one of the most important centers of arbitration of the world. For sure, its more important than NY, and probably as important as London and Paris.

Last but not least, the faculty of MIDS is amazing... but again, you have to be familiar with the arbitration world to realize that you will not find that faculty in any other program of the world. Regarding the admision process, I dont know how competitive is, im still waiting for an answer, but if you check the background of the alumni in the website, most of the students have a very intresting and diverse background!
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bookcrazy
Diana
You have been a staunch supporter of the MIDS program, to the level that most of us here on the board think you are some marketing agent from MIDS itself.

You need to be sensitive to the purpose with which most LLM applicants come on this board. It is because they are looking for a top class education, some expertise, or various other things depending on individual needs. They are also here because the number of options out there are too much to know all of on your own. Therefore, we come here and share our views in ways such could be useful to the others.

You may be right in saying that Geneva is as much a center of arbitrations as London, though it sounds preposterous to me. London is not only rich in arbitrations domestically, but also is kind of the middle ground for all Asian business interactions with Europe or Americas. Further, English law is generally the law of choice for most international contracts and to avoid conflicts with procedural law, London is the preferred seat for most of these arbitrations. Geneva may be big within Europe, but it cannot compare with the amount of commercial disputes being handled at London as it includes pretty much the entire globe.

I doubt if anyone looking at MIDS contests that the faculty is unquestionably the best, I also doubt anyone can contest that if 'arbitration law' alone is what you want to read, probably MIDS will give you the most extensive course.

However, the fact remains that 'arbitration law' only decides matters related to the process of dispute resolution that arbitration is. It does not relate to the substantive law of the dispute. Contract Law is the base of all that comes to arbitration because arbitration is an alternate method of dispute resolution 'contracted to' by the parties. There are specific institutions which will have a little different methods and procedures, but the essential aspects of all arbitrations are jurisprudentially the same.

If one looks to practice arbitrations, deep knowledge of contracts and some knowledge of other fields of law is essential. For example, to do WTO arbitrations, knowing how WTO arbitrations are conducted is not sufficient. One must have a deep understanding of WTO laws. Similarly with WIPO. Similarly with maritime arbitration. One may not know anything about maritime arbitrations, but if you have done arbitrations before and you understand maritime law, you will be in a better position to handle maritime arbitrations than someone who knows all about LMAA rules but not much about maritime law.

Arbitration is a process of dispute resolution. It is not a seperate set of laws for dispute resolution. Knowledge of various other substantive laws is essential if one wants to practice arbitrations.

I have been dealing with arbitrations for the last 3 years as a lawyer, almost exclusively. It is wrong to suggest that the law of arbitration is rocket science. It is definitely not as complex as the law of evidence or as detailed as the civil procedure laws. It is new, certain approaches are unique and one can get the hang of it easily. I strongly feel an entire year studying only arbitration subjects may not be worth it unless one wants to become an academician in that field. From a practitioner's point of view, one module in arbitration is more than sufficient.

This comes from someone who might end up studying at MIDS if he finds some aid. MIDS is a great program and will definitely be exciting. But one must take a call knowing all there is to know.
Diana
You have been a staunch supporter of the MIDS program, to the level that most of us here on the board think you are some marketing agent from MIDS itself.

You need to be sensitive to the purpose with which most LLM applicants come on this board. It is because they are looking for a top class education, some expertise, or various other things depending on individual needs. They are also here because the number of options out there are too much to know all of on your own. Therefore, we come here and share our views in ways such could be useful to the others.

You may be right in saying that Geneva is as much a center of arbitrations as London, though it sounds preposterous to me. London is not only rich in arbitrations domestically, but also is kind of the middle ground for all Asian business interactions with Europe or Americas. Further, English law is generally the law of choice for most international contracts and to avoid conflicts with procedural law, London is the preferred seat for most of these arbitrations. Geneva may be big within Europe, but it cannot compare with the amount of commercial disputes being handled at London as it includes pretty much the entire globe.

I doubt if anyone looking at MIDS contests that the faculty is unquestionably the best, I also doubt anyone can contest that if 'arbitration law' alone is what you want to read, probably MIDS will give you the most extensive course.

However, the fact remains that 'arbitration law' only decides matters related to the process of dispute resolution that arbitration is. It does not relate to the substantive law of the dispute. Contract Law is the base of all that comes to arbitration because arbitration is an alternate method of dispute resolution 'contracted to' by the parties. There are specific institutions which will have a little different methods and procedures, but the essential aspects of all arbitrations are jurisprudentially the same.

If one looks to practice arbitrations, deep knowledge of contracts and some knowledge of other fields of law is essential. For example, to do WTO arbitrations, knowing how WTO arbitrations are conducted is not sufficient. One must have a deep understanding of WTO laws. Similarly with WIPO. Similarly with maritime arbitration. One may not know anything about maritime arbitrations, but if you have done arbitrations before and you understand maritime law, you will be in a better position to handle maritime arbitrations than someone who knows all about LMAA rules but not much about maritime law.

Arbitration is a process of dispute resolution. It is not a seperate set of laws for dispute resolution. Knowledge of various other substantive laws is essential if one wants to practice arbitrations.

I have been dealing with arbitrations for the last 3 years as a lawyer, almost exclusively. It is wrong to suggest that the law of arbitration is rocket science. It is definitely not as complex as the law of evidence or as detailed as the civil procedure laws. It is new, certain approaches are unique and one can get the hang of it easily. I strongly feel an entire year studying only arbitration subjects may not be worth it unless one wants to become an academician in that field. From a practitioner's point of view, one module in arbitration is more than sufficient.

This comes from someone who might end up studying at MIDS if he finds some aid. MIDS is a great program and will definitely be exciting. But one must take a call knowing all there is to know.


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DianaBerk
It is fine, you can think I am a top secret agent from the CIA hired by the MIDS to make some marketing... is up to you, but I dont beleive they need it, as you said they have the best faculty and that speaks by itself! That I like the MIDS is not news, I have been saying it the whole time and that is the reason I have applied for it. So maybe you will be a classmate of a CIA agent, thats cool! =)

I was just saying that if you want to learn about arbitration in general, one or two courses is not enough. I dont agree with your view. I never said it is rocket science... nothing in law is rocket science. What you say about the complexity of law of eveidence and civil procedure law might be true, but at the end it is the same in arbitration... you will have evidence and procedural problems also in arbitration. However, it will depend on the arbitration law and applicable rules, whether those problems are very complex or not. Some laws and rules are much more detailed than others... and sometimes you have much more problems when they are not very detalid, because the law or the rule doesnt give you the answer!

On the other hand, of course that you need to know substantial law... the procedural law alone is nothing, and substantial law alone is nothing! But if you enrole in a program like this, it is supposed that you should already know substantive law. All what you said about contract law is very nice, but contract law is basic and it is a subject, or several subjects, of any law degree. If you dont know contract law at this time, its a bit strange... Finally, and in my capacity of top secret agent, I should say that the MIDS also have substantive courses in WTO and other subjects...

Ahh one more thing, Geneva is defintly as important as London and Paris... probably Swiss and French courts are more pro-arbitration than English Courts... but no-one discusses that those three jurisdiction are great for arbitration! They are almost the same. besides the fact that Geneva has much more dispute settlement centers than London.

Diana
It is fine, you can think I am a top secret agent from the CIA hired by the MIDS to make some marketing... is up to you, but I dont beleive they need it, as you said they have the best faculty and that speaks by itself! That I like the MIDS is not news, I have been saying it the whole time and that is the reason I have applied for it. So maybe you will be a classmate of a CIA agent, thats cool! =)

I was just saying that if you want to learn about arbitration in general, one or two courses is not enough. I dont agree with your view. I never said it is rocket science... nothing in law is rocket science. What you say about the complexity of law of eveidence and civil procedure law might be true, but at the end it is the same in arbitration... you will have evidence and procedural problems also in arbitration. However, it will depend on the arbitration law and applicable rules, whether those problems are very complex or not. Some laws and rules are much more detailed than others... and sometimes you have much more problems when they are not very detalid, because the law or the rule doesnt give you the answer!

On the other hand, of course that you need to know substantial law... the procedural law alone is nothing, and substantial law alone is nothing! But if you enrole in a program like this, it is supposed that you should already know substantive law. All what you said about contract law is very nice, but contract law is basic and it is a subject, or several subjects, of any law degree. If you dont know contract law at this time, its a bit strange... Finally, and in my capacity of top secret agent, I should say that the MIDS also have substantive courses in WTO and other subjects...

Ahh one more thing, Geneva is defintly as important as London and Paris... probably Swiss and French courts are more pro-arbitration than English Courts... but no-one discusses that those three jurisdiction are great for arbitration! They are almost the same. besides the fact that Geneva has much more dispute settlement centers than London.

Diana
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tanay0903
Hey, I have finally decided to joining the MIDS program! Prospective classmates please contact me on tanay0903@gmail.com!
Hey, I have finally decided to joining the MIDS program! Prospective classmates please contact me on tanay0903@gmail.com!
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