LLM in Germany


Sword
Hi all
I am an Egyptian Lawyer with 20 years experience, LLB Alexandria university 1995
Now I am thinking about optaning LLM from Germany and I am wondering if I take that step will I be able to work in Germany as a Lawyer or in legal field generally .
Please I need help about that matter with details.
Thanks in advance
Hi all
I am an Egyptian Lawyer with 20 years experience, LLB Alexandria university 1995
Now I am thinking about optaning LLM from Germany and I am wondering if I take that step will I be able to work in Germany as a Lawyer or in legal field generally .
Please I need help about that matter with details.
Thanks in advance
quote
flori

Now I am thinking about optaning LLM from Germany and I am wondering if I take that step will I be able to work in Germany as a Lawyer or in legal field generally .


Hello,
"as a lawyer": No. http://www.ibanet.org/PPID/Constituent/Student_Committee/qualify_lawyer_Germany.aspx
https://www.anerkennung-in-deutschland.de/html/en/lawyer.php

Bye
flori
<blockquote>
Now I am thinking about optaning LLM from Germany and I am wondering if I take that step will I be able to work in Germany as a Lawyer or in legal field generally .
</blockquote>

Hello,
"as a lawyer": No. http://www.ibanet.org/PPID/Constituent/Student_Committee/qualify_lawyer_Germany.aspx
https://www.anerkennung-in-deutschland.de/html/en/lawyer.php

Bye
flori
quote
rjrg1989
Hello flori, any advice for a foreing lawyer about what is possible to do to get a job in germany? Is an LLM useful? What kind of jobs could she apply to then?
Thanks
Hello flori, any advice for a foreing lawyer about what is possible to do to get a job in germany? Is an LLM useful? What kind of jobs could she apply to then?
Thanks
quote
Alain
https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=foreign+lawyer+germany

An LLM does not qualify you to practice law in Germany, but may be helpful for other reasons.

[Edited by Alain on Aug 13, 2016]

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=foreign+lawyer+germany

An LLM does not qualify you to practice law in Germany, but may be helpful for other reasons.
quote
rjrg1989
Could you say wich reasons? If someone is a lawyer in another country and wants to go to Germany to practice corporate law for example (not be a Volljurist) what would she/he require??
Could you say wich reasons? If someone is a lawyer in another country and wants to go to Germany to practice corporate law for example (not be a Volljurist) what would she/he require??
quote
MBL-FU
Hi Sword, I'm a bit late to the party but if you want to work as a lawyer in Germany with an LLM degree, your best bet is to look for bigger companies or law firms. Without a state examination you might not be entitled to practice law in courts, but international law firms and companies still value your ability to to understand both jurisdictions. I work at FU Berlin and we had some graduates who decided to stay here after obtaining the degree and they work for business law firms or companies which need their expertise in their home jurisdiction as well as their understanding of European law.

As a practical example: An international company/client usually needs a broad range of advice when concluding agreements or merging or just introducing a new product. This entails an in-depth understanding of the requirements of each market. If an international merger results in a dominant market position in only a few market, these could still foil the whole deal. If product cannot be marketed in Egypt because it violates consumer protection laws, most companies will decide to manufacturer the product in a compliant way right from the start. You get the idea.

I hope this also partially answers your question, rjrg1989? Whether you succeed or not depends on a variety of aspects: The type of law you specialise in (commercial and business law or international public and international criminal law work better than labour law, for instance), how important knowledge in your home jurisdiction is in this field and of course the work environment (urban cities usually offer more jobs for internationals, but sometimes 'hidden champions' can also be an option in slightly more rural areas).

Good luck with whatever decision you make!
MBL-FU from Berlin
Hi Sword, I'm a bit late to the party but if you want to work as a lawyer in Germany with an LLM degree, your best bet is to look for bigger companies or law firms. Without a state examination you might not be entitled to practice law in courts, but international law firms and companies still value your ability to to understand both jurisdictions. I work at FU Berlin and we had some graduates who decided to stay here after obtaining the degree and they work for business law firms or companies which need their expertise in their home jurisdiction as well as their understanding of European law.

As a practical example: An international company/client usually needs a broad range of advice when concluding agreements or merging or just introducing a new product. This entails an in-depth understanding of the requirements of each market. If an international merger results in a dominant market position in only a few market, these could still foil the whole deal. If product cannot be marketed in Egypt because it violates consumer protection laws, most companies will decide to manufacturer the product in a compliant way right from the start. You get the idea.

I hope this also partially answers your question, rjrg1989? Whether you succeed or not depends on a variety of aspects: The type of law you specialise in (commercial and business law or international public and international criminal law work better than labour law, for instance), how important knowledge in your home jurisdiction is in this field and of course the work environment (urban cities usually offer more jobs for internationals, but sometimes 'hidden champions' can also be an option in slightly more rural areas).

Good luck with whatever decision you make!
MBL-FU from Berlin
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