LLM in Europe taught in English


the1whale
Hi everyone, just wondering which European universities offer LLMs taught in English? Is there a comprehensive list somewhere?
Hi everyone, just wondering which European universities offer LLMs taught in English? Is there a comprehensive list somewhere?
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MBL-FU
Hi the1whale, here's one amazing programme in Berlin taught completely in English: https://llm-guide.com/schools/europe/germany/fu-berlin-institute-for-german-and-european-business-competition-and-regulatory-law Needless to say, I work for the programme but have a look at what a current student of us had to say over here: https://llm-guide.com/board/europe/business-and-competition-berlin-198117

I would strongly suggest to be a bit more specific in your request, what kind of law are you interested in? :-)
Best regards from Berlin!
Hi the1whale, here's one amazing programme in Berlin taught completely in English: https://llm-guide.com/schools/europe/germany/fu-berlin-institute-for-german-and-european-business-competition-and-regulatory-law Needless to say, I work for the programme but have a look at what a current student of us had to say over here: https://llm-guide.com/board/europe/business-and-competition-berlin-198117

I would strongly suggest to be a bit more specific in your request, what kind of law are you interested in? :-)
Best regards from Berlin!
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Laws
Yes we offer a LLM in European & Comparative Law and LLM in European Business Law at the University of Malta and the courses are all in English.
Yes we offer a LLM in European & Comparative Law and LLM in European Business Law at the University of Malta and the courses are all in English.
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Vera N
I'm a graduate from London (but not British origin) who is accepted to the LL.M International Legal Studies in Vienna and to the Leiden International Law Program- both taught in English. Vienna's professors are so well known academically, that my English superviser recommended to give Vienna the number one chance. Vienna has many international organisations and also the OSCE and UNCITRAL. Leiden is famous too. Perhaps we ought to aim at the reputation of the teachers? The program in Leiden is enormous, while the Viennese program has several focuses taught by real insiders. What do you say? Geneva, Leiden or LL.M. International Legal Studies in Vienna? I think Vienna has so much to offer altogether.
I'm a graduate from London (but not British origin) who is accepted to the LL.M International Legal Studies in Vienna and to the Leiden International Law Program- both taught in English. Vienna's professors are so well known academically, that my English superviser recommended to give Vienna the number one chance. Vienna has many international organisations and also the OSCE and UNCITRAL. Leiden is famous too. Perhaps we ought to aim at the reputation of the teachers? The program in Leiden is enormous, while the Viennese program has several focuses taught by real insiders. What do you say? Geneva, Leiden or LL.M. International Legal Studies in Vienna? I think Vienna has so much to offer altogether.
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There are heaps of LLM programmes in English in the Netherlands, and in a wide variety of disciplines. www.keuzegids.org ranks the programmes annually so you can see which programmes in the Netherlands are the best in which fields.
There are heaps of LLM programmes in English in the Netherlands, and in a wide variety of disciplines. www.keuzegids.org ranks the programmes annually so you can see which programmes in the Netherlands are the best in which fields.
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Just because the Netherlands converse in English doesn't mean that other countries have less to offer. In Public International Law I would choose either Leiden or the Hague if I went to Holland, but if I wanted to specialise in international organisations or become a Diplomat I would go for Geneva or Vienna because of the International Organisations. If I wanted to specialise in Investment Arbitration or criminal law, capitals like the Hague and Vienna have an additional importance as regards variety and the fact that they aren't merely University towns. The teaching faculties comprise renowned practitioners who have published widely. Vienna's International Legal Studies Program only caters for 20 students and is taught by experts in International Economic Law and IOs- how's that? I'd say excellent!!! - of course they teach in English - only!!
Just because the Netherlands converse in English doesn't mean that other countries have less to offer. In Public International Law I would choose either Leiden or the Hague if I went to Holland, but if I wanted to specialise in international organisations or become a Diplomat I would go for Geneva or Vienna because of the International Organisations. If I wanted to specialise in Investment Arbitration or criminal law, capitals like the Hague and Vienna have an additional importance as regards variety and the fact that they aren't merely University towns. The teaching faculties comprise renowned practitioners who have published widely. Vienna's International Legal Studies Program only caters for 20 students and is taught by experts in International Economic Law and IOs- how's that? I'd say excellent!!! - of course they teach in English - only!!
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I am willing to apply for Competition, Business and Regulatory Law Program at Freie University in Berlin.
However I am wondering about the acceptance of this masters in english in terms of finding a job with it in Berlin after it.
Could the MBL-FU profile explain it better, please?
I am willing to apply for Competition, Business and Regulatory Law Program at Freie University in Berlin.
However I am wondering about the acceptance of this masters in english in terms of finding a job with it in Berlin after it.
Could the MBL-FU profile explain it better, please?
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MBL-FU
Hi _brazilian_lawyer, I hope I answered your questions in the PM sufficiently. For the sake of others who frequently ask the same questions about perspectives, I'll repeat the essential points:

1. Specialisation and a programme that fits

It really depends on what you want to focus on! Specialised in International Criminal Law? The Hague and Leiden definitely have a reputation due to the ICC. Maritime Law? Try Rotterdam or Hamburg! International Arbitration? Swiss universities have focussed on this for ages!

As for business law in General, the two front-runners are usually Germany - as the most important economy in Europe and the biggest net export nation in the world - or the UK as the most important English-speaking country in Europe. France usually follows these two quite closely with a smaller Economy than both and less degrees in English but a great focus on academia. Smaller countries have made their mark, too, especially the Netherlands (for trade and maritime law) and Sweden by providing ample of English-taught programmes.

2. Employment after graduation

Bear in mind that after an excellent qualification, you still need to find a job. Europeans enjoy free movement of workers within the EU, so getting a qualification in Germany and moving to the UK afterwards is usually not a problem (this could change after Brexit). Before looking for a job, you have to decide whether you want to a) take advantage of your previous qualification (recommended) or b) start all over from scratch. If you do take advantage of your previous education, I would suggest having a look at the most important trading partners for your country. For Brazil, the largest EU exporters are Germany (14%) and Italy (1%) while the largest EU importers are the Netherlands (15%) and Germany (7%). Language also plays a role, especially when you can use your native language in an EU country (Brazilian portuguese in Portugal / Latin-American Spanish in Spain). In other Countries (France, Netherlands, Germany) learning the language will be on your to-do list sooner or later. You can work in English for quite a while without problems, but when you go to the bakery around the corner on a Sunday morning, you feel stupid after a while not knowing how to name those delicious treats correctly.

3. Living in the EU

I don't understand why so many people seem to ignore this crucial aspect when making a potentially live-changing decision. You will not only work in another country, but also live there. While the German or French economy might be strong and promising for a career, you might find after a few years that the German or French lifestyle just isn't for you and that you'd be happier in maybe Italy or Greece. There are ways to "measure" quality of life for a country or a city but it also has to fit your personal plans.

Puh, well I thought this would be a short (!) summary, sorry for not keeping that promise!
Best,
MBL-FU Berlin
Hi _brazilian_lawyer, I hope I answered your questions in the PM sufficiently. For the sake of others who frequently ask the same questions about perspectives, I'll repeat the essential points:

1. Specialisation and a programme that fits

It really depends on what you want to focus on! Specialised in International Criminal Law? The Hague and Leiden definitely have a reputation due to the ICC. Maritime Law? Try Rotterdam or Hamburg! International Arbitration? Swiss universities have focussed on this for ages!

As for business law in General, the two front-runners are usually Germany - as the most important economy in Europe and the biggest net export nation in the world - or the UK as the most important English-speaking country in Europe. France usually follows these two quite closely with a smaller Economy than both and less degrees in English but a great focus on academia. Smaller countries have made their mark, too, especially the Netherlands (for trade and maritime law) and Sweden by providing ample of English-taught programmes.

2. Employment after graduation

Bear in mind that after an excellent qualification, you still need to find a job. Europeans enjoy free movement of workers within the EU, so getting a qualification in Germany and moving to the UK afterwards is usually not a problem (this could change after Brexit). Before looking for a job, you have to decide whether you want to a) take advantage of your previous qualification (recommended) or b) start all over from scratch. If you do take advantage of your previous education, I would suggest having a look at the most important trading partners for your country. For Brazil, the largest EU exporters are Germany (14%) and Italy (1%) while the largest EU importers are the Netherlands (15%) and Germany (7%). Language also plays a role, especially when you can use your native language in an EU country (Brazilian portuguese in Portugal / Latin-American Spanish in Spain). In other Countries (France, Netherlands, Germany) learning the language will be on your to-do list sooner or later. You can work in English for quite a while without problems, but when you go to the bakery around the corner on a Sunday morning, you feel stupid after a while not knowing how to name those delicious treats correctly.

3. Living in the EU

I don't understand why so many people seem to ignore this crucial aspect when making a potentially live-changing decision. You will not only work in another country, but also live there. While the German or French economy might be strong and promising for a career, you might find after a few years that the German or French lifestyle just isn't for you and that you'd be happier in maybe Italy or Greece. There are ways to "measure" quality of life for a country or a city but it also has to fit your personal plans.

Puh, well I thought this would be a short (!) summary, sorry for not keeping that promise!
Best,
MBL-FU Berlin
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Jenny121
Sorry for highjacking the thread is it still possible to apply to any of the programmes mentioned? Preferrably with a focus on business law?
Thank you
Sorry for highjacking the thread is it still possible to apply to any of the programmes mentioned? Preferrably with a focus on business law?
Thank you
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