IT LAW: Eulisp program or Tilburg?


mimmolino
i have been admitted in two Llm about information technology law: eulisp program (hanover university+6 mounths abroad, in my case Stockolm) and Tilburg University. What Do you suggest Me?

Please help Me, guys
i have been admitted in two Llm about information technology law: eulisp program (hanover university+6 mounths abroad, in my case Stockolm) and Tilburg University. What Do you suggest Me?

Please help Me, guys
quote
zazika
Hi,
first, congratulations for being admitted. Which one did you choose then?
I have a question regarding EULISP programme: is it very hard to get accepted? I am really interested in IT law and I am plannig to apply, but I would like to know how much chances I have, since I don't have very much related working experiences. And I am not German, so I don't know how they evaluate foreign Diplomas. Does the average grade of all exams counts or just the grade of the thesis?

I would be really grateful for any information about the programme from anyone!

Thank you!
Hi,
first, congratulations for being admitted. Which one did you choose then?
I have a question regarding EULISP programme: is it very hard to get accepted? I am really interested in IT law and I am plannig to apply, but I would like to know how much chances I have, since I don't have very much related working experiences. And I am not German, so I don't know how they evaluate foreign Diplomas. Does the average grade of all exams counts or just the grade of the thesis?

I would be really grateful for any information about the programme from anyone!

Thank you!

quote
i have been admitted in two Llm about information technology law: eulisp program (hanover university+6 mounths abroad, in my case Stockolm) and Tilburg University. What Do you suggest Me?

Please help Me, guys


Hi mimmolino, may I ask which programm did you chose after all? I'm planning to apply to those masters you mentioned and try to find out whinch one is the better, comparing courses, tuition fees and cities to live.
thank you in advance
<blockquote>i have been admitted in two Llm about information technology law: eulisp program (hanover university+6 mounths abroad, in my case Stockolm) and Tilburg University. What Do you suggest Me?

Please help Me, guys
</blockquote>

Hi mimmolino, may I ask which programm did you chose after all? I'm planning to apply to those masters you mentioned and try to find out whinch one is the better, comparing courses, tuition fees and cities to live.
thank you in advance
quote
Hi everyone,

I am planning to apply to EULISP because I am very interested in IP, as well as IT. Does anyone know if is it recommended and if would be a big problem if I am not a German speaker?

Thank you
Hi everyone,

I am planning to apply to EULISP because I am very interested in IP, as well as IT. Does anyone know if is it recommended and if would be a big problem if I am not a German speaker?

Thank you
quote
Hi pepmassons,
I am interested too in both of the fields, and I applied to Tilburg, KU Leuven at Brussels, QMUL, and LSE.
I've been accepted from the first 3 and I think I'm going to Brussels for the Advanced Masters in IP and ICT Law.
As far as I know, all these need just english. For Eulisp I don't remember. But I know you can do a semester in other Universities, such as KULeven in Brussels.

Hi everyone,

I am planning to apply to EULISP because I am very interested in IP, as well as IT. Does anyone know if is it recommended and if would be a big problem if I am not a German speaker?

Thank you
Hi pepmassons,
I am interested too in both of the fields, and I applied to Tilburg, KU Leuven at Brussels, QMUL, and LSE.
I've been accepted from the first 3 and I think I'm going to Brussels for the Advanced Masters in IP and ICT Law.
As far as I know, all these need just english. For Eulisp I don't remember. But I know you can do a semester in other Universities, such as KULeven in Brussels.

<blockquote>Hi everyone,

I am planning to apply to EULISP because I am very interested in IP, as well as IT. Does anyone know if is it recommended and if would be a big problem if I am not a German speaker?

Thank you</blockquote>
quote
IamTheLaw
Hey there!

@pepmassons

I think English language will suffice for EULISP:

http://www.eulisp.de/modules-413.html

As you can see, you can attend modules taught in English or German.

@ giuliettina

Big congrats! :) Did you already have a Masters degree? From what I know you can apply to this "Advanced" Master" only if you already have an LLM/Masters degree.

Also, do consider the housing matter if you choose Brussels. From what I know a 3x3 flat costs around 500 EUR/month.
Hey there!

@pepmassons

I think English language will suffice for EULISP:

http://www.eulisp.de/modules-413.html

As you can see, you can attend modules taught in English or German.

@ giuliettina

Big congrats! :) Did you already have a Masters degree? From what I know you can apply to this "Advanced" Master" only if you already have an LLM/Masters degree.

Also, do consider the housing matter if you choose Brussels. From what I know a 3x3 flat costs around 500 EUR/month.
quote
Hi @iamthelaw
Thanks!
I think you can find a room also for less than 500, maybe not in the city centre... By the way is far less expensive than London...
Yes I've already a master's degree just because in Italy it's a 5-year unique degree..
Also I would like to work part-time during the master and I thought that in Brussels would be easier to find a job... But I'm not sure yet.
Have you been accepted in Tilburg?

Hey there!

@pepmassons

I think English language will suffice for EULISP:

http://www.eulisp.de/modules-413.html

As you can see, you can attend modules taught in English or German.

@ giuliettina

Big congrats! :) Did you already have a Masters degree? From what I know you can apply to this "Advanced" Master" only if you already have an LLM/Masters degree.

Also, do consider the housing matter if you choose Brussels. From what I know a 3x3 flat costs around 500 EUR/month.
Hi @iamthelaw
Thanks!
I think you can find a room also for less than 500, maybe not in the city centre... By the way is far less expensive than London...
Yes I've already a master's degree just because in Italy it's a 5-year unique degree..
Also I would like to work part-time during the master and I thought that in Brussels would be easier to find a job... But I'm not sure yet.
Have you been accepted in Tilburg?

<blockquote>Hey there!

@pepmassons

I think English language will suffice for EULISP:

http://www.eulisp.de/modules-413.html

As you can see, you can attend modules taught in English or German.

@ giuliettina

Big congrats! :) Did you already have a Masters degree? From what I know you can apply to this "Advanced" Master" only if you already have an LLM/Masters degree.

Also, do consider the housing matter if you choose Brussels. From what I know a 3x3 flat costs around 500 EUR/month.</blockquote>
quote
IamTheLaw
Hi giuliettina,

I didn't apply for 2015 (still have to take the IELTS exam) but I'm looking forward for 2016.

Indeed, Brussels is "cheaper" than London and from I what I know it also has a large community of italians :)

I hope you will have a very nice experience in Brussels!
Hi giuliettina,

I didn't apply for 2015 (still have to take the IELTS exam) but I'm looking forward for 2016.

Indeed, Brussels is "cheaper" than London and from I what I know it also has a large community of italians :)

I hope you will have a very nice experience in Brussels!
quote
Erick
Hi mimmolino and giulettina! My name is Erick López and I'm currently studying at Tilburg, so I will talk about my experience here.
- Courses. I'm not particularly fond of IP subjects but of course they are tremendously relevant nowadays. What I like the most about this Law and Technology Master is the various options you have to choose whatever fits you best. In the IP side there's ICT contracts, european intellectual property law, e-commerce and technology and intellectual property rights. On the other hand, there are some helpful courses if you want to explore other aspects of IT law: cybercrime, climate law, health, care and technology and biotechnology, privacy and data protection, liability and the internet. I have focused on these subjects and I'm genuinely satisfied with them. It's not easy to be able to have such a wide scope in front of you as a student, so I think this is an advantage you have to take into account.

- I see that the program in Hannover is focused in German IT law. In Tilburg the focus is an European one, so that's also quite helpful. I'm from Mexico, so now I'm acquiring a pretty good understanding of IT law not just for a specific country.

- Accommodation. In my case I'm paying 400 euros per month, all inclusive. I know some students who pay around 270, 300. It depends on your budget of course but there are several options.

I hope I had provided you with some help. Let me know if you have more questions about this option!
Hi mimmolino and giulettina! My name is Erick López and I'm currently studying at Tilburg, so I will talk about my experience here.
- Courses. I'm not particularly fond of IP subjects but of course they are tremendously relevant nowadays. What I like the most about this Law and Technology Master is the various options you have to choose whatever fits you best. In the “IP side” there's ICT contracts, european intellectual property law, e-commerce and technology and intellectual property rights. On the other hand, there are some helpful courses if you want to explore other aspects of IT law: cybercrime, climate law, health, care and technology and biotechnology, privacy and data protection, liability and the internet. I have focused on these subjects and I'm genuinely satisfied with them. It's not easy to be able to have such a wide scope in front of you as a student, so I think this is an advantage you have to take into account.

- I see that the program in Hannover is focused in German IT law. In Tilburg the focus is an European one, so that's also quite helpful. I'm from Mexico, so now I'm acquiring a pretty good understanding of IT law not just for a specific country.

- Accommodation. In my case I'm paying 400 euros per month, all inclusive. I know some students who pay around 270, 300. It depends on your budget of course but there are several options.

I hope I had provided you with some help. Let me know if you have more questions about this option!
quote
IamTheLaw
Hi Erick,

Thank you very much for your thoughts. I must confess they are very helpful and touched several important points which everyone should consider before applying for this LLM.

Based on your experience so far, do you happen to know if EUR 1000 month will suffice for both accommodation and other expenses (eg food).

Best wishes,
Sorin
Hi Erick,

Thank you very much for your thoughts. I must confess they are very helpful and touched several important points which everyone should consider before applying for this LLM.

Based on your experience so far, do you happen to know if EUR 1000 month will suffice for both accommodation and other expenses (eg food).

Best wishes,
Sorin
quote
Erick
Yes, you can make it. I spend around 300 euros for food monthly, so my basic needs are covered with 700. Actually, I have a scholarship from my country and I get 1000 euros, so it's a sufficient amount.
Nice weekend,
Erick.
Yes, you can make it. I spend around 300 euros for food monthly, so my basic needs are covered with 700. Actually, I have a scholarship from my country and I get 1000 euros, so it's a sufficient amount.
Nice weekend,
Erick.
quote
zazika
Hi,
I studied EULISP last year, can clarify some things.
Hannover was not based on German law, at least not English classes-it was more EU/International, however, they did always explain how it is in Germany, and we had some German cases (but of course, you have that in any country you study). German classes are obviously different, but I did not take them,so I can't say.
I spent second semester in QMUL, it is really really really good uni! If anyone's considering it, I recommend going there. But also other uni's were great, not much complaining from my classmates. Brussels apparently is very good as well.
As for the money, in Hannover it's quite cheap-accommodation and food, it's cool because you have 'semesterticket' so you have free public transport in Niedersachsen-lot's of beautiful places to visit!!
Otherwise, I survived with around 1000e in London, of which half of is it rent, so I guess in any other EU city (apart from Scandinavia) you can easily live with the same amount.

Oh, and I do recommend the program, living in 2 cities for 1 study is just great, you do learn a lot, but it's not THAT hard to pass, Hannover is fun and small group is better than large classes I think. Also the price is quite good...and you can choose where you will live the next semester! I liked it.

Good luck!
Hi,
I studied EULISP last year, can clarify some things.
Hannover was not based on German law, at least not English classes-it was more EU/International, however, they did always explain how it is in Germany, and we had some German cases (but of course, you have that in any country you study). German classes are obviously different, but I did not take them,so I can't say.
I spent second semester in QMUL, it is really really really good uni! If anyone's considering it, I recommend going there. But also other uni's were great, not much complaining from my classmates. Brussels apparently is very good as well.
As for the money, in Hannover it's quite cheap-accommodation and food, it's cool because you have 'semesterticket' so you have free public transport in Niedersachsen-lot's of beautiful places to visit!!
Otherwise, I survived with around 1000e in London, of which half of is it rent, so I guess in any other EU city (apart from Scandinavia) you can easily live with the same amount.

Oh, and I do recommend the program, living in 2 cities for 1 study is just great, you do learn a lot, but it's not THAT hard to pass, Hannover is fun and small group is better than large classes I think. Also the price is quite good...and you can choose where you will live the next semester! I liked it.

Good luck!
quote
Hi,

Thank you for the information. Otherwise, I have to choose were to spend the 2nd semester and I'm between Leuven, Oslo, Glasgow and Rovaniemi. Rovaniemi attracts me a lot because they give more subjects to opt for, but I dont know if the Uni and the place are OK. What do you recommend me?

Thank you
Hi,

Thank you for the information. Otherwise, I have to choose were to spend the 2nd semester and I'm between Leuven, Oslo, Glasgow and Rovaniemi. Rovaniemi attracts me a lot because they give more subjects to opt for, but I don’t know if the Uni and the place are OK. What do you recommend me?

Thank you
quote
Ripley
As a first choice select some university in UK eg. Queen Mary , etc, the student coordination and customer care in UK is far better, communication is better, and you get a chance to improve your English. The university name on the CV also appears more recognizable to employers.
If at all you have to choose between EULISP or Tilburg, go for the latter, avoid EULISP Hannover!
Heres why-
There is zero coordination and support for international students, you will not get any help in finding accommodation. There are no special welcome days solely for the concerns of non-EU students, like UK universities have. Internationalization of programs is a failed experiment in EULISP. If you are EU / visa free and just have to get on the train with a bag, even then finding accommodation is a problem, although its a bit easier than non-EU students.
So the first few weeks will be wasted in running around searching for a place to stay. The free semester transport tickets are given from October, so in September you would have spent a lot of money on GVH cards in order to go and search for apartments!
If you are a genuine student, this will affect the time you should have been spending on studies, reading, etc. Classes run all day so even if you have an appointment to view an apartment you have to either miss classes or miss the viewing. The academic legal English classes run late in the evening from 5 PM, so if you are staying at a place far from a bus stop, you have to factor in security concerns, either of theft of phone and laptop or if you are female something more frightful. Even in Hannover, a migrant attempted to rape a German girl at a bus stop. You will notice the migrants approaching you and begging at many places in Hannover centre.
By the time you find a place to live in Hannover, you will now finally be told by the program coordinator where you are going to spend your second semester. So as non-EU you have to restart the whole visa and accommodation thing- that is way too much trouble for a crappy program.
At least at Tilburg, after the initial struggle to find accommodation you are now free to focus on your studies for the rest of the year. Maybe exchange semesters are better suited for longer degree programs!
Also German student visa procedure is very tiresome for non-EU students, I had to spend a lot of time and money in signature verification for blocked bank account, courier fees, further more money to get a certified copy of the passport, etc. You will also need a police clearance certificate, which they sometimes ask for at the last minute, so depending on your country, that is further headache.
You have to block 8000 euros in a Deutsche bank account, and if for some reason you have to leave the country or if your course is over, trying to close it will require further running around for documents from local foreign office.
In a nutshell while Germany is bending over backwards to accommodate migrants and refugees with no IDs and police clearances, their procedure for genuine legal students is way too unwelcoming! Even after jumping through all these hoops to arrive in their country legally, all you will get is a cold shoulder and threats.
In my case the coordinator of the EULISP program threatened to report me to the police just because I had to leave the country as soon as possible after requesting the local foreign office to cancel my student visa so I could close the Deutsche bank account and recover my 8000 euros! For a country where rapes committed by migrants are not being reported by the media and the police, being threatened to be reported to the police was just too insulting for me! I wrote back to this guy that I left his country after permission from the embassy and local foreigners office and through legal channels, this EULISP coordinator dared to imply that I had gone missing in Germany!
Tilburg has better research in the field of IT law. I had an offer from them for the previous intake but due to work commitments could not join, I regret wasting my time on this EULISP experience. Also the Dutch speak better English, quality of education is good and Dutch is far easier to learn than German.
Also for visa, Netherlands universities have a dedicated international office, and the visa is processed through them. All you have to do is send all the necessary documents and show bank balance in accepted format and generally there is no need to transfer funds before visa approval. At Tilburg there are further opportunities at research level degrees, if you do well in your LLM.
Tilburg and most Netherlands universities have a far better ranking than this EULISP crap, so even if you are not 100% satisfied with the program, you at least get a high ranking university name on your CV.
Avoid EULISP Hannover!
As a first choice select some university in UK eg. Queen Mary , etc, the student coordination and customer care in UK is far better, communication is better, and you get a chance to improve your English. The university name on the CV also appears more recognizable to employers.
If at all you have to choose between EULISP or Tilburg, go for the latter, avoid EULISP Hannover!
Here’s why-
There is zero coordination and support for international students, you will not get any help in finding accommodation. There are no special welcome days solely for the concerns of non-EU students, like UK universities have. Internationalization of programs is a failed experiment in EULISP. If you are EU / visa free and just have to get on the train with a bag, even then finding accommodation is a problem, although it’s a bit easier than non-EU students.
So the first few weeks will be wasted in running around searching for a place to stay. The free semester transport tickets are given from October, so in September you would have spent a lot of money on GVH cards in order to go and search for apartments!
If you are a genuine student, this will affect the time you should have been spending on studies, reading, etc. Classes run all day so even if you have an appointment to view an apartment you have to either miss classes or miss the viewing. The academic legal English classes run late in the evening from 5 PM, so if you are staying at a place far from a bus stop, you have to factor in security concerns, either of theft of phone and laptop or if you are female something more frightful. Even in Hannover, a migrant attempted to rape a German girl at a bus stop. You will notice the migrants approaching you and begging at many places in Hannover centre.
By the time you find a place to live in Hannover, you will now finally be told by the program coordinator where you are going to spend your second semester. So as non-EU you have to restart the whole visa and accommodation thing- that is way too much trouble for a crappy program.
At least at Tilburg, after the initial struggle to find accommodation you are now free to focus on your studies for the rest of the year. Maybe exchange semesters are better suited for longer degree programs!
Also German student visa procedure is very tiresome for non-EU students, I had to spend a lot of time and money in signature verification for blocked bank account, courier fees, further more money to get a certified copy of the passport, etc. You will also need a police clearance certificate, which they sometimes ask for at the last minute, so depending on your country, that is further headache.
You have to block 8000 euros in a Deutsche bank account, and if for some reason you have to leave the country or if your course is over, trying to close it will require further running around for documents from local foreign office.
In a nutshell while Germany is bending over backwards to accommodate migrants and refugees with no IDs and police clearances, their procedure for genuine legal students is way too unwelcoming! Even after jumping through all these hoops to arrive in their country legally, all you will get is a cold shoulder and threats.
In my case the coordinator of the EULISP program threatened to report me to the police just because I had to leave the country as soon as possible after requesting the local foreign office to cancel my student visa so I could close the Deutsche bank account and recover my 8000 euros! For a country where rapes committed by migrants are not being reported by the media and the police, being threatened to be reported to the police was just too insulting for me! I wrote back to this guy that I left his country after permission from the embassy and local foreigners’ office and through legal channels, this EULISP coordinator dared to imply that I had gone missing in Germany!
Tilburg has better research in the field of IT law. I had an offer from them for the previous intake but due to work commitments could not join, I regret wasting my time on this EULISP experience. Also the Dutch speak better English, quality of education is good and Dutch is far easier to learn than German.
Also for visa, Netherlands universities have a dedicated international office, and the visa is processed through them. All you have to do is send all the necessary documents and show bank balance in accepted format and generally there is no need to transfer funds before visa approval. At Tilburg there are further opportunities at research level degrees, if you do well in your LLM.
Tilburg and most Netherlands universities have a far better ranking than this EULISP crap, so even if you are not 100% satisfied with the program, you at least get a high ranking university name on your CV.
Avoid EULISP Hannover!
quote
Hi,
I studied EULISP last year, can clarify some things.
Hannover was not based on German law, at least not English classes-it was more EU/International, however, they did always explain how it is in Germany, and we had some German cases (but of course, you have that in any country you study). German classes are obviously different, but I did not take them,so I can't say.
I spent second semester in QMUL, it is really really really good uni! If anyone's considering it, I recommend going there. But also other uni's were great, not much complaining from my classmates. Brussels apparently is very good as well.
As for the money, in Hannover it's quite cheap-accommodation and food, it's cool because you have 'semesterticket' so you have free public transport in Niedersachsen-lot's of beautiful places to visit!!
Otherwise, I survived with around 1000e in London, of which half of is it rent, so I guess in any other EU city (apart from Scandinavia) you can easily live with the same amount.

Oh, and I do recommend the program, living in 2 cities for 1 study is just great, you do learn a lot, but it's not THAT hard to pass, Hannover is fun and small group is better than large classes I think. Also the price is quite good...and you can choose where you will live the next semester! I liked it.

Good luck!


Hi!

I am very interested in taking the LLM of EULISP, not only for the accesible price but for the experience is coming with, i mean, having the opportunity to study in two universtities is pretty great. That is why i would be please if you tell me how hard it was to apply and being accepted from the LLM Program. I have some regular experiencie (1.5 year) in IT LAW from my country and currently improving my english.

At the moment, i'm running of time to get all the documents because the deadline is May 31st.

Hoping you could clarify my questions. Best Regards!!
[quote]Hi,
I studied EULISP last year, can clarify some things.
Hannover was not based on German law, at least not English classes-it was more EU/International, however, they did always explain how it is in Germany, and we had some German cases (but of course, you have that in any country you study). German classes are obviously different, but I did not take them,so I can't say.
I spent second semester in QMUL, it is really really really good uni! If anyone's considering it, I recommend going there. But also other uni's were great, not much complaining from my classmates. Brussels apparently is very good as well.
As for the money, in Hannover it's quite cheap-accommodation and food, it's cool because you have 'semesterticket' so you have free public transport in Niedersachsen-lot's of beautiful places to visit!!
Otherwise, I survived with around 1000e in London, of which half of is it rent, so I guess in any other EU city (apart from Scandinavia) you can easily live with the same amount.

Oh, and I do recommend the program, living in 2 cities for 1 study is just great, you do learn a lot, but it's not THAT hard to pass, Hannover is fun and small group is better than large classes I think. Also the price is quite good...and you can choose where you will live the next semester! I liked it.

Good luck!
[/quote]

Hi!

I am very interested in taking the LLM of EULISP, not only for the accesible price but for the experience is coming with, i mean, having the opportunity to study in two universtities is pretty great. That is why i would be please if you tell me how hard it was to apply and being accepted from the LLM Program. I have some regular experiencie (1.5 year) in IT LAW from my country and currently improving my english.

At the moment, i'm running of time to get all the documents because the deadline is May 31st.

Hoping you could clarify my questions. Best Regards!!
quote

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