ILF vs FU Berlin vs Bucerius


Snefru

Hi everyone,

I graduated from a top law school in Turkey with high honors last year. Currently I’m doing my 1 year compulsory legal training to be admitted to Turkish Bar as an attorney. Then, I’d like to do an LLM in Europe. I’ve already got accepted into Leiden Law & Finance LLM. But my two main goals are staying in Europe after LLM and learning German. I can’t learn German in the Netherlands and I don’t know whether Leiden or German schools are better to stay in Europe.

So, I lean towards these German LLM:
1- Frankfurt ILF - Finance LLM
2- FU Berlin - Business, Competition and Regulatory LLM
3- Hamburg Bucerius - Business LLM

I am interested in all these subjects. My main consideration is to find a job related to law, finance, regulation, etc. in Europe after LLM. So what do you think about these programs and Leiden?

Thank you very much!

Hi everyone,

I graduated from a top law school in Turkey with high honors last year. Currently I’m doing my 1 year compulsory legal training to be admitted to Turkish Bar as an attorney. Then, I’d like to do an LLM in Europe. I’ve already got accepted into Leiden Law & Finance LLM. But my two main goals are staying in Europe after LLM and learning German. I can’t learn German in the Netherlands and I don’t know whether Leiden or German schools are better to stay in Europe.

So, I lean towards these German LLM:
1- Frankfurt ILF - Finance LLM
2- FU Berlin - Business, Competition and Regulatory LLM
3- Hamburg Bucerius - Business LLM

I am interested in all these subjects. My main consideration is to find a job related to law, finance, regulation, etc. in Europe after LLM. So what do you think about these programs and Leiden?

Thank you very much!
quote

German LLM is not a smart choice for you. You won't be able to practice anything related to the law after LLM. Germans are too serious about law and do not prefer foreigners to practice it. That does not mean it is impossible but I would rather call it difficult.
NL has a more international atmoshpere when u compare with Germany but it is also hard for you to practice local law there. If you got admitted to Leiden that means you can get admitted to the Law programs in Canada or US too. Those countries are more open for foreign lawyers to practice law in their country. But bear in mind wherever you go you will be a second or third level lawyer for the locals since you have not got the legal education in their system. I know Turkish lawyers(who are even in much better position than you with their academic background) in UK and US, and what they do is to care mostly about Immigration Law since local clients would not hire them for other areas of law.
I know what is written in my comment does not fit with your dreams but this is the reality.

German LLM is not a smart choice for you. You won't be able to practice anything related to the law after LLM. Germans are too serious about law and do not prefer foreigners to practice it. That does not mean it is impossible but I would rather call it difficult.
<div>NL has a more international atmoshpere when u compare with Germany but it is also hard for you to practice local law there. If you got admitted to Leiden that means you can get admitted to the Law programs in Canada or US too. Those countries are more open for foreign lawyers to practice law in their country. But bear in mind wherever you go you will be a second or third level lawyer for the locals since you have not got the legal education in their system. I know Turkish lawyers(who are even in much better position than you with their academic background) in UK and US, and what they do is to care mostly about Immigration Law since local clients would not hire them for other areas of law.<br>I know what is written in my comment does not fit with your dreams but this is the reality.</div>
quote
Snefru

German LLM is not a smart choice for you. You won't be able to practice anything related to the law after LLM. Germans are too serious about law and do not prefer foreigners to practice it. That does not mean it is impossible but I would rather call it difficult.
NL has a more international atmoshpere when u compare with Germany but it is also hard for you to practice local law there. If you got admitted to Leiden that means you can get admitted to the Law programs in Canada or US too. Those countries are more open for foreign lawyers to practice law in their country. But bear in mind wherever you go you will be a second or third level lawyer for the locals since you have not got the legal education in their system. I know Turkish lawyers(who are even in much better position than you with their academic background) in UK and US, and what they do is to care mostly about Immigration Law since local clients would not hire them for other areas of law.
I know what is written in my comment does not fit with your dreams but this is the reality.


Hi,

Thank you so much for your answer. I actually don't want to practice law as an attorney in Europe. I am aware that traditional law practice is quite difficult for a foreigner. But I think I have some chance in financial institutions, big companies, startups, audit and consulting companies, and maybe some specific departments of law firms (finance, competition, regulation, etc.). I know Turkish people who did LLM at ILF or Leiden and currently working at those kind of institutions in Europe. Actually, I don't even care about practicing law at all. I'm just looking for the most suitable program in Europe to get a regular white collar job in Europe.

Thank you again :)

[quote]German LLM is not a smart choice for you. You won't be able to practice anything related to the law after LLM. Germans are too serious about law and do not prefer foreigners to practice it. That does not mean it is impossible but I would rather call it difficult.
<div>NL has a more international atmoshpere when u compare with Germany but it is also hard for you to practice local law there. If you got admitted to Leiden that means you can get admitted to the Law programs in Canada or US too. Those countries are more open for foreign lawyers to practice law in their country. But bear in mind wherever you go you will be a second or third level lawyer for the locals since you have not got the legal education in their system. I know Turkish lawyers(who are even in much better position than you with their academic background) in UK and US, and what they do is to care mostly about Immigration Law since local clients would not hire them for other areas of law.<br>I know what is written in my comment does not fit with your dreams but this is the reality.</div> [/quote]<br><br>Hi,<br><br>Thank you so much for your answer. I actually don't want to practice law as an attorney in Europe. I am aware that traditional law practice is quite difficult for a foreigner. But I think I have some chance in financial institutions, big companies, startups, audit and consulting companies, and maybe some specific departments of law firms (finance, competition, regulation, etc.). I know Turkish people who did LLM at ILF or Leiden and currently working at those kind of institutions in Europe. Actually, I don't even care about practicing law at all. I'm just looking for the most suitable program in Europe to get a regular white collar job in Europe.<br><br>Thank you again :)
quote

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