Eligibility to take German State Examination


Hi everyone,
I'm a new member at LLM GUIDE.
I've tried (unsuccessfully) to find some information on the requirements to sit for the German State Examination. I have a foreign (non-EU) law degree and would like to pursue an LLM degree in Germany. I know that an LLM degree will not, by itself, allow me to take the State Exam in Germany.
However, is it possible to take additional courses in Germany in order to meet the requirements to sit for the State Exam? Are there other additional qualifications that would allow me to take the exam? Is studying a law degree at the university level in Germany the only way?
Does everyone know where I can find official detailed information about this?
Thanks a lot in advance!
Hi everyone,
I'm a new member at LLM GUIDE.
I've tried (unsuccessfully) to find some information on the requirements to sit for the German State Examination. I have a foreign (non-EU) law degree and would like to pursue an LLM degree in Germany. I know that an LLM degree will not, by itself, allow me to take the State Exam in Germany.
However, is it possible to take additional courses in Germany in order to meet the requirements to sit for the State Exam? Are there other additional qualifications that would allow me to take the exam? Is studying a law degree at the university level in Germany the only way?
Does everyone know where I can find official detailed information about this?
Thanks a lot in advance!
quote
TiGGer
You could find information on wikipedia (keywords like "Staatsexamen" "legel education Germany" etc. should help) or the Federal Ministry of Justice ("Bundesjustizministerium") in Berlin, but be aware that legal education in Germany is entirely a matter of the 16 states of Germany! So every state has its own rules, which are, however, generally pretty much the same.

As far as I know studying law at a German University is the only way to sit the 2 (!) German State Exams. The first one finishes after usually 4-5 years of study at uni, the second one after another 2 years of practical training. The exams are REALLY difficult and cover every aspect of German law without hardly any limitations. They consist of ususally 6-8 written closed book exams of 5 hours each and an oral exam lasting also round about 5 hours - covering all areas of civil, criminal, public, EU and procedural law. Generally u don't know ur examiners as they can be professors, prosecutors, judges, lawyers, administrative clerks...so u have to be prepared for everything.

For EU law graduates it is slightly easier as there is the opportunity to sit an apptitute test or to practice within Germany for some years. However, this doesn't seem to apply to you.

So, r u sure u really want to do that hastle to urself??
You could find information on wikipedia (keywords like "Staatsexamen" "legel education Germany" etc. should help) or the Federal Ministry of Justice ("Bundesjustizministerium") in Berlin, but be aware that legal education in Germany is entirely a matter of the 16 states of Germany! So every state has its own rules, which are, however, generally pretty much the same.

As far as I know studying law at a German University is the only way to sit the 2 (!) German State Exams. The first one finishes after usually 4-5 years of study at uni, the second one after another 2 years of practical training. The exams are REALLY difficult and cover every aspect of German law without hardly any limitations. They consist of ususally 6-8 written closed book exams of 5 hours each and an oral exam lasting also round about 5 hours - covering all areas of civil, criminal, public, EU and procedural law. Generally u don't know ur examiners as they can be professors, prosecutors, judges, lawyers, administrative clerks...so u have to be prepared for everything.

For EU law graduates it is slightly easier as there is the opportunity to sit an apptitute test or to practice within Germany for some years. However, this doesn't seem to apply to you.

So, r u sure u really want to do that hastle to urself??
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Wow, you are right, I don't think I want to go through so many years of study and practical training just to be able to sit the 2 German State Exams (for personal considerations, because I wish to start working in a not too distant future). I will take a look at the Bundesjustizministerium webpage and also search on wiki, though. Thanks so much for your information!
Wow, you are right, I don't think I want to go through so many years of study and practical training just to be able to sit the 2 German State Exams (for personal considerations, because I wish to start working in a not too distant future). I will take a look at the Bundesjustizministerium webpage and also search on wiki, though. Thanks so much for your information!
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