UofL LLM Program


Hi I wnna ask you guys a couple of questions about the UofL LLM program.......How hard are the exams? Do you have to know the course material inside out to pass the exams? Is it possible to finish the program in 1 year (sitting 2 courses in May and another 2 in Oct)? Any tips for someone interested in the program would be much appreciated!!!!!
Hi I wnna ask you guys a couple of questions about the UofL LLM program.......How hard are the exams? Do you have to know the course material inside out to pass the exams? Is it possible to finish the program in 1 year (sitting 2 courses in May and another 2 in Oct)? Any tips for someone interested in the program would be much appreciated!!!!!
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barbar
Hi - did you find answers to your questions? I am also wondering the same things about this program
Hi - did you find answers to your questions? I am also wondering the same things about this program
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UoLIP
Hi,

I actually work for the University of London International Programmes, so my opinion and advice is not impartial. However, based on recent statistics, I am able to give you some guidance on the UoL LLM.

To give you an indication of how challenging the exams are:

6636 exams were registered for last year but in 1776 cases the examinee was absent. Therefore 4860 exams were actually sat. Of these, 4217 passed and 643 failed. That is a pass rate of 87%.

It is up to you how long you choose to study for. It will depend on your work and personal commitments as well as your study situation and study style. However, it is recommended that you dedicate a total of around 115 hours for each module you study which means it will take about 1,840 hours in total to complete the full Master of Laws. If you think you can spare 1,840 hours within one year, then yes, the LLM can be completed within a year.

I hope this helps a little.

Best regards,

Emma
Hi,

I actually work for the University of London International Programmes, so my opinion and advice is not impartial. However, based on recent statistics, I am able to give you some guidance on the UoL LLM.

To give you an indication of how challenging the exams are:

6636 exams were registered for last year but in 1776 cases the examinee was absent. Therefore 4860 exams were actually sat. Of these, 4217 passed and 643 failed. That is a pass rate of 87%.

It is up to you how long you choose to study for. It will depend on your work and personal commitments as well as your study situation and study style. However, it is recommended that you dedicate a total of around 115 hours for each module you study – which means it will take about 1,840 hours in total to complete the full Master of Laws. If you think you can spare 1,840 hours within one year, then yes, the LLM can be completed within a year.

I hope this helps a little.

Best regards,

Emma
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tinfangc
Hi,

It takes a lot of reading hours (academic books, articles, research) and practicing past year examination questions to get through these examinations

The best tips would be to look through the examiner's report of the modules you would be taking. Their responses would give a general idea what they expect from students in examination. you can work it out from there.

I am doing my LLM (International Business Law), had a LLB from UoL as well. Through my experience, you need to dedicate your time into it.

Best.
Hi,

It takes a lot of reading hours (academic books, articles, research) and practicing past year examination questions to get through these examinations

The best tips would be to look through the examiner's report of the modules you would be taking. Their responses would give a general idea what they expect from students in examination. you can work it out from there.

I am doing my LLM (International Business Law), had a LLB from UoL as well. Through my experience, you need to dedicate your time into it.

Best.
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raniagh
hi please how can i contact you for more info.
hi please how can i contact you for more info.
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I enrolled in the LLB program in 2008. I enrolled because my wife and I had a just had our first child; I was having a lot of sleepless nights, and Netflix hadn’t yet been made available. I had no ambition of becoming a lawyer, and in fact, most people I worked with who were lawyers weren’t very happy in the profession. I also had a career I liked already, and I was good at it, or so I thought. I started nearly 20 years since I earned my first degree, from a highly-regarded Canadian university, where I had excelled with very respectable grades. The UofL LLB was very demanding; I studied harder than I had for anything ever, and I passed by a narrow margin in four years. The greatest outcome of the experience was a higher appreciation for the law and people engaged in it. I was two years in when Thomas Bingham passed. I lamented his death awkwardly; the only way I knew him was from his decisions, but when you read these things, I think you get to know people really well. The same happens for Denning and Wilberforce, and across the Atlantic, Hugo Black and John Stevens, Bertha Wilson and Bora Laskin, to name a few. The course that I dreaded the most was Trust Law, but it was actually transformative – like reading Proust, it just unlocked a lot of understanding. In fact, I was so intrigued that after finishing I enrolled in the PG certificate program and ultimately finished with LLM in internal and comparative intellectual property law. The LLM was less stringent in terms of examinations IMO, but very comprehensive. All this knowledge make me a better citizen and little better at my job maybe, and the opportunity cost was really some boozy nights at a local pub with friends watching my local hockey team lose. I like writing papers, and UofL doesn’t have that option. Writing essay papers in an exam setting isn’t my thing, and that hurt my performance. But overall, the method of study is one that’s economic, not just in terms of money, but time. There’s no way I would have suspended my livelihood for a decade to study under other circumstances, and I am grateful for the program’s availability. In 50 years all education will be delivered this way. Recommend.

[Edited by Charlie Grahn on Oct 31, 2017]

I enrolled in the LLB program in 2008. I enrolled because my wife and I had a just had our first child; I was having a lot of sleepless nights, and Netflix hadn’t yet been made available. I had no ambition of becoming a lawyer, and in fact, most people I worked with who were lawyers weren’t very happy in the profession. I also had a career I liked already, and I was good at it, or so I thought. I started nearly 20 years since I earned my first degree, from a highly-regarded Canadian university, where I had excelled with very respectable grades. The UofL LLB was very demanding; I studied harder than I had for anything ever, and I passed by a narrow margin in four years. The greatest outcome of the experience was a higher appreciation for the law and people engaged in it. I was two years in when Thomas Bingham passed. I lamented his death awkwardly; the only way I knew him was from his decisions, but when you read these things, I think you get to know people really well. The same happens for Denning and Wilberforce, and across the Atlantic, Hugo Black and John Stevens, Bertha Wilson and Bora Laskin, to name a few. The course that I dreaded the most was Trust Law, but it was actually transformative – like reading Proust, it just unlocked a lot of understanding. In fact, I was so intrigued that after finishing I enrolled in the PG certificate program and ultimately finished with LLM in internal and comparative intellectual property law. The LLM was less stringent in terms of examinations IMO, but very comprehensive. All this knowledge make me a better citizen and little better at my job maybe, and the opportunity cost was really some boozy nights at a local pub with friends watching my local hockey team lose. I like writing papers, and UofL doesn’t have that option. Writing essay papers in an exam setting isn’t my thing, and that hurt my performance. But overall, the method of study is one that’s economic, not just in terms of money, but time. There’s no way I would have suspended my livelihood for a decade to study under other circumstances, and I am grateful for the program’s availability. In 50 years all education will be delivered this way. Recommend.
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