Canadian 2 Year J.D at UBC


Meelypops
Hi,
I'm currently an undergraduate at Kent averaging about 69% (high 2:1) I'm looking to apply to UBC at some stage to their advance standing J.D which is 2 years. I've read I need to apply to the NCA for advance standing but don't understand how that could possibly happen before I graduate! The problem being that I need to apply to UBC before I get my classification. I was wondering if anybody knew how it worked?

Would I just have to apply for a 3 year J.D course?

I was also wondering if anybody knew what GPA a high 2:1 would be on a 4.3 scale, I've heard around 3.6-3.8 as a ballpark figure.

Any help would be appreciated.
Hi,
I'm currently an undergraduate at Kent averaging about 69% (high 2:1) I'm looking to apply to UBC at some stage to their advance standing J.D which is 2 years. I've read I need to apply to the NCA for advance standing but don't understand how that could possibly happen before I graduate! The problem being that I need to apply to UBC before I get my classification. I was wondering if anybody knew how it worked?

Would I just have to apply for a 3 year J.D course?

I was also wondering if anybody knew what GPA a high 2:1 would be on a 4.3 scale, I've heard around 3.6-3.8 as a ballpark figure.

Any help would be appreciated.
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Pluto
A 2.1 is approx. a B+ in Canada. It's generally the standard requirement to do an LLM or PhD. A high 2.1 is probably more on par with a A-, but they don't seem to distinguish between a high or low 2.1 for entry requirements. (Try using an agency who does qual equivalency for a better idea).

Contact the NCA to see if you can achieve some sort of assessment of your qualification prior to graduation (they are strict though). You could also contact UBC directly - they will have a very good idea about the standard of a UK law degree.

Why not just sit the NCA exams? Rather than the two year JD. A Canadian JD will cost you a small fortune.
A 2.1 is approx. a B+ in Canada. It's generally the standard requirement to do an LLM or PhD. A high 2.1 is probably more on par with a A-, but they don't seem to distinguish between a high or low 2.1 for entry requirements. (Try using an agency who does qual equivalency for a better idea).

Contact the NCA to see if you can achieve some sort of assessment of your qualification prior to graduation (they are strict though). You could also contact UBC directly - they will have a very good idea about the standard of a UK law degree.

Why not just sit the NCA exams? Rather than the two year JD. A Canadian JD will cost you a small fortune.
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Meelypops
Thanks, Pluto.

You couldn't suggest such an agency could you?


I've sent emails out to both the NCA and UBC and I'm just waiting on replies.

Hmm, I have considered that as an option, I'm not sure how long it would take etc
Thanks, Pluto.

You couldn't suggest such an agency could you?


I've sent emails out to both the NCA and UBC and I'm just waiting on replies.

Hmm, I have considered that as an option, I'm not sure how long it would take etc
quote
Pluto
Try this http://www.cicic.ca/ (may or may not be of help).
You'll probably also have to do the LSAT.
Try this http://www.cicic.ca/ (may or may not be of help).
You'll probably also have to do the LSAT.
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First some clarifications. U mentioned that u r pursuing ur undergrad at Kent (I presume thats a non-legal field), then u want to pursue a JD in Canada.

U can only apply to NCA once u have a law degree (an LLB, JD etc). Once you have a local law degree from canada you will no longer need to do NCA exams.

Now if you are already doing an LLB from Kent then after you complete your course, then apply to NCA. you will be advised of how many exams you have to give. Depending on the evaluation you can either opt to give the challenge exams or join law school to do the exams as part of their curriculam.
First some clarifications. U mentioned that u r pursuing ur undergrad at Kent (I presume thats a non-legal field), then u want to pursue a JD in Canada.

U can only apply to NCA once u have a law degree (an LLB, JD etc). Once you have a local law degree from canada you will no longer need to do NCA exams.

Now if you are already doing an LLB from Kent then after you complete your course, then apply to NCA. you will be advised of how many exams you have to give. Depending on the evaluation you can either opt to give the challenge exams or join law school to do the exams as part of their curriculam.
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Meelypops
Thanks!

Well I'm doing an undergrad LLB.

I get that I have to apply to the NCA but its an issue of whether or not I can apply and get 'advanced standing' before I apply to a canadian law school, as Id quite like to do a 2 year JD.
Thanks!

Well I'm doing an undergrad LLB.

I get that I have to apply to the NCA but its an issue of whether or not I can apply and get 'advanced standing' before I apply to a canadian law school, as Id quite like to do a 2 year JD.
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WHY DONT U JUST SIT FOR THE nca EXAMS, U CAN COMPLETE THEM IN 6 MONTHS
WHY DONT U JUST SIT FOR THE nca EXAMS, U CAN COMPLETE THEM IN 6 MONTHS
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Poppet
It is arguably going to take more than 6 months to pass the NCA exams. I don't know why you would try to suggest otherwise to someone instead of giving them realistic information on the system, which can be very troublesome for foreign lawyers to go through.

To the OP: I say this with respect, but no, you don't seem to have understood. You are already pursuing an LLB, so for you to qualify as a lawyer in Canada you would take the NCA exams to "convert" your LLB to a Canadian law degree. You would NOT take the JD program, whether in an advanced standing program or otherwise, once you have already obtained your law degree in your home country. In Canada LLBs and JDs are different in name only - the JD is not superior to an LLB and the curriculum is no different. Do not confuse the name "juris doctorate" to mean that it is superior to the LLB programs offered in other schools - the JD is not a graduate-level program in Canada any more than the LLB is. For this reason the 2-year JD program is not for someone coming from a common-law jurisdiction who already has a law degree. That person is expected to take the NCA exams to qualify to practice in Canada because they have already completed law school and know the fundamental basics of law itself.

The JD program allows completion in two years only IF you are transferring from another law school and have already completed your first year, OR if you are coming from a foreign law school which is not of the common law tradition. The advanced-standing programs are for people coming from Quebec or Italy or France, for example, who would ostensibly be completely lost trying to complete NCA exams based on common law themes when they have not studied the basics of common law in the first place. So the 2-year JD program is not developed for a person with a British LLB, but for someone who is transferring to the school in the middle of their studies, or who has completed a law degree in a different legal tradition and needs to learn the basics of Canadian law in a more intensive manner so that they can then qualify to pass the bar. If you were a lawyer from a civil law tradition this path would make sense because you would need 2 years of common law training in order to help you understand law in BC because it is so different from the roman tradition. But as a Brit, you can study for the NCA exams instead (pending approval by the NCA of course.)

I hope this clarified things a bit.
It is arguably going to take more than 6 months to pass the NCA exams. I don't know why you would try to suggest otherwise to someone instead of giving them realistic information on the system, which can be very troublesome for foreign lawyers to go through.

To the OP: I say this with respect, but no, you don't seem to have understood. You are already pursuing an LLB, so for you to qualify as a lawyer in Canada you would take the NCA exams to "convert" your LLB to a Canadian law degree. You would NOT take the JD program, whether in an advanced standing program or otherwise, once you have already obtained your law degree in your home country. In Canada LLBs and JDs are different in name only - the JD is not superior to an LLB and the curriculum is no different. Do not confuse the name "juris doctorate" to mean that it is superior to the LLB programs offered in other schools - the JD is not a graduate-level program in Canada any more than the LLB is. For this reason the 2-year JD program is not for someone coming from a common-law jurisdiction who already has a law degree. That person is expected to take the NCA exams to qualify to practice in Canada because they have already completed law school and know the fundamental basics of law itself.

The JD program allows completion in two years only IF you are transferring from another law school and have already completed your first year, OR if you are coming from a foreign law school which is not of the common law tradition. The advanced-standing programs are for people coming from Quebec or Italy or France, for example, who would ostensibly be completely lost trying to complete NCA exams based on common law themes when they have not studied the basics of common law in the first place. So the 2-year JD program is not developed for a person with a British LLB, but for someone who is transferring to the school in the middle of their studies, or who has completed a law degree in a different legal tradition and needs to learn the basics of Canadian law in a more intensive manner so that they can then qualify to pass the bar. If you were a lawyer from a civil law tradition this path would make sense because you would need 2 years of common law training in order to help you understand law in BC because it is so different from the roman tradition. But as a Brit, you can study for the NCA exams instead (pending approval by the NCA of course.)

I hope this clarified things a bit.
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Meelypops
Thanks!

That's most helpful.

So the high and low of it is that I have to take the NCA exams. I understand these can be self-study, or done within a Canadian university?

Would I be able to apply for accreditation before I've graduated with my LLB?
Thanks!

That's most helpful.

So the high and low of it is that I have to take the NCA exams. I understand these can be self-study, or done within a Canadian university?

Would I be able to apply for accreditation before I've graduated with my LLB?
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popett, it depends on how many exams NCA recommends. Most of the common law graduates get on an average 4 to 5 papers. I dont know why there is such a hype about NCA. I gave 4 papers in 3 months and cleared all of them.

I know a lot of people who have given all 4 to 5 papers in one attempt. Believe me all it requires is some dedication. They are not that tough.
popett, it depends on how many exams NCA recommends. Most of the common law graduates get on an average 4 to 5 papers. I dont know why there is such a hype about NCA. I gave 4 papers in 3 months and cleared all of them.

I know a lot of people who have given all 4 to 5 papers in one attempt. Believe me all it requires is some dedication. They are not that tough.

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U will be able to apply to NCA only after you graduate, after u get ur transcripts.

You can study for the challenge exams on ur own or join university and give the exams as part of their curriculam. The latter part is expensive. So it depends on individual to individual.

If you pick up challenge exams, then you can study as well as find a job and work...
U will be able to apply to NCA only after you graduate, after u get ur transcripts.

You can study for the challenge exams on ur own or join university and give the exams as part of their curriculam. The latter part is expensive. So it depends on individual to individual.

If you pick up challenge exams, then you can study as well as find a job and work...
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HF Rabbi
could anyone please let me know that whats the procedure to sit for NCA exams ? can i evaluated my LLB degree by NCA through online ? can i study and sit for the NCA exams from my homecountry instead of being present in Canada ?? please please let me know.
I am from Bangladesh.
could anyone please let me know that whats the procedure to sit for NCA exams ? can i evaluated my LLB degree by NCA through online ? can i study and sit for the NCA exams from my homecountry instead of being present in Canada ?? please please let me know.
I am from Bangladesh.
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