NY-Bar Exam


Hello all

I have completed my under-grad in 2015 and since then I have been a practicing Lawyer (in India) which means I have a three year experience. I am also registered with State bar and has also cleared the AIBE(All India Bar Examination).

My query is would I be eligible to sit for NewYork State Bar Exam directly? and if yes, how and where do I send my application for seeking approval? Some guidance would be of great help.

Thankyou!!
Hello all

I have completed my under-grad in 2015 and since then I have been a practicing Lawyer (in India) which means I have a three year experience. I am also registered with State bar and has also cleared the AIBE(All India Bar Examination).

My query is would I be eligible to sit for NewYork State Bar Exam directly? and if yes, how and where do I send my application for seeking approval? Some guidance would be of great help.

Thankyou!!
quote
#
Hello,

You should find all your answers on the NYBE's website: https://www.nybarexam.org/Foreign/ForeignLegalEducation.htm

[W]ould I be eligible to sit for NewYork State Bar Exam directly?

Maybe - See 22 NYCRR 520.6 (https://www.nybarexam.org/Rules/Rules.htm#520.6)

A. Rule 520.6 (b) (1) (most applicants will be applying under this provision) has four major eligibility requirements:
1. Qualifying Degree (520.6 (b) (1)). The foreign-educated applicant must have fulfilled the educational requirements for admission to the practice of law in a foreign country other than the United States. The applicant must have a qualifying degree, which must be a degree in law.
2. Accreditation (520.6(b)(1)). The qualifying degree must be from a law school or schools recognized by a competent accrediting agency of the government of the foreign country and must be deemed qualified and approved.
3. Durational Equivalence (520.6 (b])(1) (i) (a)). The applicant’s period of law study must be successfully completed. The program of study must also be "substantially" equivalent in duration to a full-time or part-time program required at a law school in the United States approved by the American Bar Association (ABA) and in substantial compliance with the instructional and academic calendar requirements of section 520.3(c)(1)(i) and (ii) and 520.3(d)(1).
4. Substantial Equivalence (520.3(b) (1) (i) (b))). The foreign country’s jurisprudence must be based upon the principles of the English Common Law, and the 'program and course of law study' successfully completed by the applicant must be the 'substantial' equivalent of the legal education provided by an ABA-approved law school in the United States.

B. Rule 520.6 (b) (2) (English Common Law based on law school and law office study) has four major eligibility requirements:
1. Admission to practice law in a foreign country whose jurisprudence is based upon the principles of the English Common Law.
2. Admission is based on a program of study in a law school and/or law office that is recognized by the competent accrediting agency of the government of such other country.
3. The combination of the law school and law office programs of study must be durationally equivalent under Rule 520.6 (b) (1) (i) (a).
4. Applicant must successfully complete a full-time or part-time program under the "cure" provision of Rule 520.6 (b) (1) (ii).

NOTE: Historically, applicants who qualify under Rule 520.6 (b) (2) are solicitors or barristers in English Common Law jurisdictions who do not have an LLB degree but who are admitted to practice based on successful completion of the Common Professional Examination course, the Graduate Diploma in Law or the Bar Vocational Course, together with a practical skills course, and a training contract (i.e., articles), the aggregate of which must satisfy the durational equivalency requirements. They will also need to complete an LLM or Master of Laws program at an approved law school in the United States pursuant to the "cure" provision.

Link: Synopsis of Requirements Under Rule 520.6, https://www.nybarexam.org/foreign/foreignlegaleducation.htm

[H]ow and where do I send my application for seeking approval?

1) Do the "Foreign Evaluation of Academic Credentials" (which is free) and wait their feedback (within 6 months). If you need to do an LL.M. to be able to sit the exam they will tell you.
- Foreign Evaluation of Academic Credentials: https://www.nybarevaluation.org/Intro.aspx

2) Create a "BOLE" account (you will use this website to register for the NYBE).
- New York State Board of Law Examiners (BOLE) Applicant Services Portal: https://www.nybarexam.org/applicantportal/

In addition, to become a NY attorney, you will also need to complete:
- the MPRE: https://www.nybarexam.org/MPRE/MPRE.html
- the NYLC/NYLE: https://www.nybarexam.org/Content/CourseMaterials.htm
- and 50h of Pro Bono: https://www.nybarexam.org/MPB.html

[Edited by # on Dec 05, 2018]

Hello,

You should find all your answers on the NYBE's website: https://www.nybarexam.org/Foreign/ForeignLegalEducation.htm

[quote][b][W]ould I be eligible to sit for NewYork State Bar Exam directly?[/b][/quote]
Maybe - See 22 NYCRR 520.6 (https://www.nybarexam.org/Rules/Rules.htm#520.6)

[quote][b]A. Rule 520.6 (b) (1)[/b] (most applicants will be applying under this provision) [b]has four major eligibility requirements[/b]:
1. [b]Qualifying Degree[/b] (520.6 (b) (1)). The foreign-educated applicant must have fulfilled the educational requirements for admission to the practice of law in a foreign country other than the United States. The applicant must have a qualifying degree, which must be a degree in law.
2. [b]Accreditation[/b] (520.6(b)(1)). The qualifying degree must be from a law school or schools recognized by a competent accrediting agency of the government of the foreign country and must be deemed qualified and approved.
3. [b]Durational Equivalence[/b] (520.6 (b])(1) (i) (a)). The applicant’s period of law study must be successfully completed. The program of study must also be "substantially" equivalent in duration to a full-time or part-time program required at a law school in the United States approved by the American Bar Association (ABA) and in substantial compliance with the instructional and academic calendar requirements of section 520.3(c)(1)(i) and (ii) and 520.3(d)(1).
4. [b]Substantial Equivalence[/b] (520.3(b) (1) (i) (b))). The foreign country’s jurisprudence must be based upon [b][u]the principles of the English Common Law[/u][/b], and the 'program and course of law study' successfully completed by the applicant must be the 'substantial' equivalent of the legal education provided by an ABA-approved law school in the United States.

[b]B. Rule 520.6 (b) (2)[/b] (English Common Law based on law school and law office study) has four major eligibility requirements:
1. Admission to practice law in a foreign country whose jurisprudence is based upon the principles of the English Common Law.
2. Admission is based on a program of study in a law school and/or law office that is recognized by the competent accrediting agency of the government of such other country.
3. The combination of the law school and law office programs of study must be durationally equivalent under Rule 520.6 (b) (1) (i) (a).
4. Applicant must successfully complete a full-time or part-time program under the "cure" provision of Rule 520.6 (b) (1) (ii).

[b]NOTE[/b]: Historically, applicants who qualify under Rule 520.6 (b) (2) are solicitors or barristers in English Common Law jurisdictions who do not have an LLB degree but who are admitted to practice based on successful completion of the Common Professional Examination course, the Graduate Diploma in Law or the Bar Vocational Course, together with a practical skills course, and a training contract (i.e., articles), the aggregate of which must satisfy the durational equivalency requirements. They will also need to complete an LLM or Master of Laws program at an approved law school in the United States pursuant to the "cure" provision.[/quote]
Link: Synopsis of Requirements Under Rule 520.6, https://www.nybarexam.org/foreign/foreignlegaleducation.htm

[quote][b][H]ow and where do I send my application for seeking approval?[/b][/quote]
1) Do the "Foreign Evaluation of Academic Credentials" (which is free) and wait their feedback (within 6 months). If you need to do an LL.M. to be able to sit the exam they will tell you.
- [b]Foreign Evaluation of Academic Credentials[/b]: https://www.nybarevaluation.org/Intro.aspx

2) Create a "BOLE" account (you will use this website to register for the NYBE).
- [b]New York State Board of Law Examiners (BOLE) Applicant Services Portal[/b]: https://www.nybarexam.org/applicantportal/

In addition, to become a NY attorney, you will also need to complete:
- the [b]MPRE[/b]: https://www.nybarexam.org/MPRE/MPRE.html
- the [b]NYLC/NYLE[/b]: https://www.nybarexam.org/Content/CourseMaterials.htm
- and [b]50h of Pro Bono[/b]: https://www.nybarexam.org/MPB.html
quote
Thankyou for the reply nicolas. Has been of great help.
Thankyou for the reply nicolas. Has been of great help.
quote

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