Want to pursue LLM from canada. Also have PQE !!


Hi guys....new to this site and also new to the idea of pursuing further studies. I did my LLB from India and have 10 years plus of work ex. Currently working in a media & entertainment co. I have just started researching on universities providing LLM degrees and have few questions regarding this. Please do excuse my ignorance as I am completely new on this expedition and will appreciate if someone could provide some guidance.

1. Is NCA mandate for practicing lawyers or does it apply to in house legal counsels too?
2. If I pursue LLM will that be an exemption from NCA process?
3. What is easier if the 2 appearing for NCA exams or getting a 1 year LLM degree.

I am sure there is a lot of competition in Canada amongst lawyers. But can someone through some light on legal careers. How is the job market?

Look forward to someone answering my questions.

Thanks in advance.

Hi guys....new to this site and also new to the idea of pursuing further studies. I did my LLB from India and have 10 years plus of work ex. Currently working in a media & entertainment co. I have just started researching on universities providing LLM degrees and have few questions regarding this. Please do excuse my ignorance as I am completely new on this expedition and will appreciate if someone could provide some guidance.

1. Is NCA mandate for practicing lawyers or does it apply to in house legal counsels too?
2. If I pursue LLM will that be an exemption from NCA process?
3. What is easier if the 2 appearing for NCA exams or getting a 1 year LLM degree.

I am sure there is a lot of competition in Canada amongst lawyers. But can someone through some light on legal careers. How is the job market?

Look forward to someone answering my questions.

Thanks in advance.
quote
chicken so...

You'll need to research licensing requirements for the province where you would like to practice. The NCA assessment is just a way to show that whatever degree you have is recognized as a law degree in the country. You'd still need to go through the licensing requirement for whatever province you're looking at, which probably includes a bar exam and potentially other hoops to jump through.

In terms of careers, I'm not sure why a Canadian firm would be interested in hiring an attorney from elsewhere. It's a cut-throat market, far too many lawyers, and most recruiting happens through well-established funnels in Canadian law schools. Unless you're already somehow connected with a  law firm (for example if you work in a branch of an international law firm and request a transfer to another branch in Canada,) it will be very, very difficult. 

You'll need to research licensing requirements for the province where you would like to practice. The NCA assessment is just a way to show that whatever degree you have is recognized as a law degree in the country. You'd still need to go through the licensing requirement for whatever province you're looking at, which probably includes a bar exam and potentially other hoops to jump through.<br><br>In terms of careers, I'm not sure why a Canadian firm would be interested in hiring an attorney from elsewhere. It's a cut-throat market, far too many lawyers, and most recruiting happens through well-established funnels in Canadian law schools. Unless you're already somehow connected with a &nbsp;law firm (for example if you work in a branch of an international law firm and request a transfer to another branch in Canada,) it will be very, very difficult.&nbsp;
quote

You'll need to research licensing requirements for the province where you would like to practice. The NCA assessment is just a way to show that whatever degree you have is recognized as a law degree in the country. You'd still need to go through the licensing requirement for whatever province you're looking at, which probably includes a bar exam and potentially other hoops to jump through.

In terms of careers, I'm not sure why a Canadian firm would be interested in hiring an attorney from elsewhere. It's a cut-throat market, far too many lawyers, and most recruiting happens through well-established funnels in Canadian law schools. Unless you're already somehow connected with a  law firm (for example if you work in a branch of an international law firm and request a transfer to another branch in Canada,) it will be very, very difficult. 


Hi! I'm a Peruvian Lawyer interested in gaining some international experience and the International Business Law LLM at Osgoode has caught my attention. However, I'm afraid that I've heard many negative comments about Canada's legal market (in particular when it comes to job prospects for internationally trained lawyers). Is it that bad?? 
Personally, I was thinking that it would be hard in any country but at least Canada is a nice country for foreigners...

Edit: may I ask for your opinion on the 

International Business Law LLM at Osgoode? I know it's not as well-known as UofT internationally, but how about in Canada?

[Edited by mariaestela on Oct 05, 2020]

[quote]You'll need to research licensing requirements for the province where you would like to practice. The NCA assessment is just a way to show that whatever degree you have is recognized as a law degree in the country. You'd still need to go through the licensing requirement for whatever province you're looking at, which probably includes a bar exam and potentially other hoops to jump through.<br><br>In terms of careers, I'm not sure why a Canadian firm would be interested in hiring an attorney from elsewhere. It's a cut-throat market, far too many lawyers, and most recruiting happens through well-established funnels in Canadian law schools. Unless you're already somehow connected with a &nbsp;law firm (for example if you work in a branch of an international law firm and request a transfer to another branch in Canada,) it will be very, very difficult.&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>Hi! I'm a Peruvian Lawyer interested in gaining some international experience and the International Business Law LLM at Osgoode has caught my attention. However, I'm afraid that I've heard many negative comments about Canada's legal market (in particular when it comes to job prospects for internationally trained lawyers). Is it that bad??&nbsp;<br>Personally, I was thinking that it would be hard in any country but at least Canada is a nice country for foreigners...<br><br>Edit: may I ask for your opinion on the&nbsp;

International Business Law LLM at Osgoode? I know it's not as well-known as UofT internationally, but how about in Canada?
quote
chicken so...

If practicing law in Canada is your goal, an LLM is probably not the best option. Better would be to do a first law degree in a Canadian school and then go through the licensing process in the province where you want to practice. This will put you in the common recruitment funnel for law firms. 

If practicing law in Canada is your goal, an LLM is probably not the best option. Better would be to do a first law degree in a Canadian school and then go through the licensing process in the province where you want to practice. This will put you in the common recruitment funnel for law firms.&nbsp;
quote
mhdjrld

If practicing law in Canada is your goal, an LLM is probably not the best option. Better would be to do a first law degree in a Canadian school and then go through the licensing process in the province where you want to practice. This will put you in the common recruitment funnel for law firms. 


Would you not recommend LLM in Common law as a positive step forward for those who intend to practice law in Canada. 

[quote]If practicing law in Canada is your goal, an LLM is probably not the best option. Better would be to do a first law degree in a Canadian school and then go through the licensing process in the province where you want to practice. This will put you in the common recruitment funnel for law firms.&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>Would you not recommend LLM in Common law as a positive step forward for those who intend to practice law in Canada.&nbsp;
quote
chicken so...

I mean, it might help you in terms of the content, but certainly not with the process of being certified to practice. 

I mean, it might help you in terms of the content, but certainly not with the process of being certified to practice.&nbsp;
quote

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